The Potential of using UltraWideBand Microwave

The Potential of using UltraWideBand Microwave technologies in the Breast Cancer Detection Sanggeetha Venkatesan Department of Signals and Systems Div...

0 downloads 87 Views 588KB Size
       

The Potential of using UltraWideBand Microwave technologies in the Breast Cancer Detection

Sanggeetha Venkatesan Department of Signals and Systems Division of Biomedical Engineering CHALMERS UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Göteborg, Sweden, 2012 Report Number: EX072/2012   1   

                                                  2   

   

 

Thesis for the Degree of Master of Science

     

 

The Potential of using UltraWideBand Microwave technologies in the Breast Cancer Detection      

 

              

Sanggeetha Venkatesan

        

 

 

 

 

 

CHALMERS 

Department of Signals and Systems Division of communication Engineering CHALMERS UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Göteborg, Sweden, 2012 3   

 

The Potential of using UltraWideBand Microwave technologies in the Breast Cancer Detection   Sanggeetha Venkatesan          Supervisor:   Hoi Shun Lui  Assistant Professor  Biomedical Electromagnetics Group  Department of Signals and Systems  Chalmers University of Technology            © Sanggeetha Venkatesan, 2012                Department of Signals and Systems  Chalmers University of Technology  SE‐412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden  Telephone +46 (0)31‐772 10 00  www.chalmers.se        4   

Abstract:   Earlier  detection  of  Breast  cancer  helps  in  increasing  the  chances  of  patients  recovery  and  survival.  In  this  thesis  project,  the  possibilities  of  using  Ultra  Wideband  (UWB)  Microwave  technologies  for  breast  cancer  detection  are  investigated.  Based  on  Singularity  Expansion  Method,  resonance‐based  target  recognition technique, that utilizes the Complex Natural Resonance (CNR) of the  breast  volumes  as  a  feature  set,  is  considered.  These  CNRs  can  be  directly  extracted  from  the  UWB  time  domain  response  using  Matrix  pencil  method  (MPM). In this project, three different strategies for CNR extraction from a single  and  multiple  time  domain  response(s)  are  studied.  The  UWB  time  domain  electromagnetic  responses  of  simple  breast  volumes  with  different  tumor  sizes  are  computed  numerically  using  commercial  solver.  The  extracted  CNRs  from  different breast volumes using different CNR extraction strategies are analysed in  details.          

Keywords:     SEM,  Matrix  Pencil  Method,  Complex  Natural  Resonance,  UltraWideBand  Microwave, polarization, breast cancer detection.  

 

 

 

 

5   

List of Abbreviations:    SEM   Singularity Expansion Method  MPM Matrix Pencil Method  CNR Comple Natural Resonance   UWB  Ultra Wideband  MRI Magnetic Resonance Imaging  MOM Method Of Moment   V Vertical  H Horizontal  R Right   L Left  ER Energy Ratio  TF Time Frequency      

  

6   

Table of Contents  1.Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 8  1.1. Problem Statement ............................................................................................................................ 8  1.2. Research Question ............................................................................................................................. 9  1.3.Purpose ............................................................................................................................................... 9  1.4.Disposition .......................................................................................................................................... 9  2.Project Methodology ............................................................................................................................... 11  2.1Literature Study ................................................................................................................................. 11  2.2Test Cases and Breast Cancer Detection ........................................................................................... 12  3. Algorithm ................................................................................................................................................ 16  3.1 Matrix Pencil Method For Single transient response ....................................................................... 16  3.2 Matrix pencil Method for multiple signals ........................................................................................ 18  4. Numerical Study and Results: ................................................................................................................. 20  4.1. Test Case1‐ Damping Exponential Signals: ...................................................................................... 20  4.2. Test Case2‐Wire Data: ...................................................................................................................... 22  4.3 Breast Cancer Detection: .................................................................................................................. 24  4.4 Multiple aspect extraction: ............................................................................................................... 47  4.5 Multiple extraction for breast volume: ............................................................................................. 47  4.6 Multiple Aspect Extraction for breast tumor detection: .................................................................. 48  4.7 Polarimetric data ............................................................................................................................... 51  4.7.a Linear polarization for 18 aspects.(VV,HH,VH,HV)..................................................................... 52  4.7.b Circular  polarization (LL, RR, LR, RL) .......................................................................................... 55  4.8 Poles extraction for NO tumor, 10mm and 15mm tumor: ............................................................... 58  5.Discussion: ............................................................................................................................................... 60  6. Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................... 61  7   

 

1.Introduction  Early detection of breast cancer can significantly improve the survival rate of the patients. In the past  couple  of  decades,  several  methods  of  detection  and  recovery  tectiniques  for  the  breast  cancer  were  continously  studied.  Most  predominontly,  imaging  approach  like  X‐Ray  mammography  and  Magnetic  Resonant Imaging technique are  in use. These two methods have some consequences and limitation,  in  which X‐Ray is an ionizing radiation and which is not preferred  for repeated exposure in short period of  time since it may cause other consequences to the patient [1]. Magnetic Resonant Imaging method [8] is  an expensive method that limits the patient for frequent examination of the cancer condition. In order  to  overcome  these  constraints,  my  project  is  to  investigate  the  chances  of  using  resonance  based  microwave  technologies  for  the  breast  cancer  detection.  Resonance  based  target  recognition  is  a  method based on Singularity Expansion Method, where the late‐time time domain transient response is  considered as it contains most of the information about the target [9]. Microwave detection techniques  are  advantageous  since  they  are  non  ionized  and  detects  the  change  in  dielectric  properties  of  the  tissue,  which  leads  to  periodic  checkup  for  the  patient  without  any  risk  and  also  it  provides  good  contrast between malignant tumors.   For  the  detection  of  nature  of  breast  cancer,  the  breast  volume  is  considered  as  the  “target.  Electromagnetic signal is impringed on the target. The response signal from the target is computed using  a Moment of Method solver called FEKO in frequency domain and Inverse fourier tranform is made to  obtain  in  a  time  domain  [10].    Late  time  response  signal  is  usually  preferred  since  it  holds  all  the  information about the target.  Among various detection techniques we choose Matrix pencil method in  our  project  study.  Matrix  pencil  method  is  linear  detection  technique,  which  handles  single  response  and  multiple  response  signals.  When  the  response  signal  from  the  target  passes  through  the  MPM  algorithm,  signal  parameters  such  as  Complex  Natural  Resonance  (CNR)  and  residues  are  extracted  which gives information about the desired target. CNR is the key parameter as it is aspect independent,  extraction of single set of CNR is possible when considering multiple response signals. Whereas, residues  are  aspect  dependent.  Multiple  response  signals  may  be  of  multiple  aspect  and  polarimetric  data,  multiple aspect response signal can be obtained from the target in many look directions with particular  polarization. Polarimetric aspect are the response data from the target in particular look direction with  all possible polarizations (4 circular or 4 linear polarization). Here, we considered two set of test cases ,  damped  exponential  signal  and  signal  from  one  meter  wire.  The  parameters  are  extracted  for  these  targets in an efficient manner with MPM algorithm which handles single transient response and multiple  signals. Breast tumor detection is done for three different cases of “No tumor”, “10mm tumor”, “15mm  tumor”. The CNR for all three cases are extracted and CNR corresponds to the tumor are obtained.  

1.1. Problem Statement  To  investigate  the  possibility  of  using  Ultra  Wideband  Microwave  technologies  such  as  Matrix  pencil  method  for  the  detection  of  nature  of  breast  cancer,  by  the  developement  of  MPM  algorithm.  8   

Numerical  study  for  the  extraction  of  signal  parameters  such  as  CNR  of  test  case,  breast  cancer    and  discusses the efficiency of MPM towards breast cancer detection.   

1.2. Research Question    How efficient that the UltraWideband Microwave technology, Matrix Pencil Method is suitable for the  extraction of signal parameters for breast cancer detection?  The  question will be  addressed in chapter –  of the report  where the  author discussed  with numerical  results and explains the efficiency of Matrix Pencil Method. 

 1.3.Purpose  The  main goal  of  the thesis  is  to  analyze  the advantages and pitfalls of  working with  an Matrix  pencil  method for the detection of nature of breast cancer.   Thus this thesis provides a detailed exposure to working of Matrix Pencil method with clear numerical  study of simple damped exponential and signal from the wire.  

1.4.Disposition   The rest of the report describes the following main topics: Project Methodology, Algorithm, Numerical  Study, Results, Discussion, Conclusion.   Chapter 2. Project MEthodology  This  chapter  describes  the  methodology  used  to  proceed  with  the  project.  The  planning  of  two  main  parts of the project which are Research methodology and Sample cases are explained well here. A brief  overview of the two methodologies that will be performed during the thesis to investigate processes is  also provided in this  section of report. It  includes an  overview of two different signals  cases, Damped  exponential signal and response signal from 1m wire. The breast tumor detection is done for 3 different  cases of breast cancer, No tumor, 10mm and 15mm tumor.     Chaper 3 Algorithm  The  third  chapters  of  the report  explains  about  flow  of  the  matrix  Pencil  Method  algorithm  for  single  look  direction  and  also  the  flow  of  algorithm  which  uses  Matrix  pencil  method  for  Multiple  signals  in  parameter extraction. From this chapter, reader gets good understanding about the working of Matrix  pencil  method.  Furthermore,  the  chapter  explains  more  about  how  MPM  algorithm  of  single  and  multiple signals treats three signal cases and helps in extracting the signal parameters.       9   

4. Numerical Study and Results   This chapter includes the signal parameters like CNR and residues which are extracted from the signal  utilising  MPM  algorithm.  These  CNR  are  clearly  explained  with  tables  and  clear  comparison  is  made  between  the  reference  and  obtained  parameters  for  test  cases.  Extracted  CNR  for  breast  cancer  detection are clearly tabulated.   5. Discussion  This  section  discusses  the  CNR  extraction  with  single  transient  response,  multiple  aspect  and  polarimetric data. The advantages of using multiple signal over single transient response at a time and  also  better  extraction  with  polarimetric  data  instead  of  multiple  aspect  are  summarized.  For  breast  canser  detection,  CNR  corresponds  to  the  tumor,  difference  in  CNR  od  3  cases  od  breast  tumor  are  detailed.     6. Conclusion  This  chapter  summarizes  the  thesis  by  describing  the  learning  outcome  and  main  experience  in  the  project. The thesis is wrapped up by providing some suggestions for the future work and summarizing  the whole research and project. 

10   

2.Project Methodology  In  this  thesis  following  two  strategies  will  be  considered  to  address  the  prementioned  problems  of  research and study of suitable solutions.  ‘’Research  can  be  termed  as  a  logical  and  systematic  search  for  new  and  useful  infoemation  on  a  particular topic. The outcome of a research is to verify and test important facts, to discover new facts  and to overcome and solve problems occuring in our everyday life’’ [1].  In order to get more information, the study was done with following two methodologies  a). Literature Study  b). Test Cases and Breast Cancer detection 

2.1Literature Study   Research  on  possibility  of  using  UWB  microwave  technologies  for  breast  cancer  detection  is  accomplished by extensive literature review on available various UWB technologies and understanding  the nature of each of them. In the recent decades there were several target detection techniques were  discussed and studied. Some of most familiar methods are Prony method, E‐Pulse technique and Matrix  Pencil Method.   To study the nature of target, an electromagnetic wave must passed through desired target and the late  time response must be considered to get all information about the target. That signal have to be studied  under  UWB  techniques  so  that  parameters  which  has  information  about  the  target  can  be  obtained.  Prony’s method is most popular and earliest linear method for parameter extraction from the response  signal. But, the main difficulties with the Prony’s method are computational complexity (i.e) it is a two  step process in finding the poles and notorious for its extreme sensitivity to noise [2].  E‐Pulse is an interesting technique for extraction of natural freqency of a radar target from a measured  response. This is a technique which is insensitive to random noise and to estimates of model content [3].  E‐pulse is an technique that helps in extraction of natural frequency of desired target and which is also a  target  recognition  technique.  An  E‐pulse  is  defined  as  a  waveform  of  finite  duration  e(t)  and  which  extinguishes  E(t)  in  the  late  time  [4].  The  convolution  of  e(t)  and  E(t)  yiels  the  null  result.  So,  if  the  natural frequency of a target are known, an E‐pulse for that target can be obtained by demanding E(s) =  0 and the convolution of natural frequency and its E‐pulse will yield zero [3].   Matrix Pencil Method is a relatively new and popular linear technique for extraction of the parameters.  It is derived from a method called pencil of funcion approach which was in use for some time [2].  Matrix  pencil method is computationally more  efficient and simple.  When  it is compared with another linear  method called Prony, it has better advantages than that (i.e) it is two step process for finding the poles  but Matrix Pencil Method is an one step process in extracting the value of poles. Apart from that, Matrix  pencil Method has a lower variance of the estimates of parameter of interest in the presence of noise  11   

than the Prony’s method. In our project Matrix Pencil Method is technique which is chosen and study of  possibility of using  UltraWideband Microwave in  breast cancer  detection is  made with  this technique.  We also considered Matrix Pencil Method with multiple look direction, where responses are recorded  along multiple look direction. An importance of multiple look direction is that the single estimate of all  the poles are done utilizing multiple transient waveforms from target along multiple look direction [5].  The major difference between the waveforms are that the residues at the various poles are of different  magnitudes.  A  single  estimate  for  the  poles  will  be  more  accurate  and  robust  to  effects  of  noise.    An  algorithm  of  MPM  and  Application  of  MPM  with  different  look  direction  are  explained  clearly  in  the  algorithm part of report.  From  the  Ultrawideband  microwave  backscatter  ranging  from  1‐11GHz,  characterization  of  targets  features such as shape, size can also be investigated numerically. Generally, Smooth, microbulated and  spiculated are the three general category in shape and four size categories which are from 0.5 to 2 cm in  diameter  were  considered  [7].  There  are  basically  two  different  methods  for  classification  in  characterization,  local  discriminant  bases  and  principal  component  analysis.  By  using  these  methods  shape and size classification can be done with signal to noise ratio ranging 10dB, target size discrimation  was 97% accurate and shape was accurate with 70% for about 360 targets. Figure 1 belows shows the 3  major steps for target recongtiion based on Ultra wideband transient electromagnetic responses.     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time domain  response (SEM)    CNR  Extraction(MPM) 

    Target  recognition 

     

 

 

Figure 1: Three major steps for extraction and detection. 

2.2Test Cases and Breast Cancer Detection  In our project, an algorithm which is chosen for study of possibility of using Ultrawideband Microwave  technology is Matrix Pencil Method. In order to deal with working of algorithm more clearly, algorithm  must be executed and tested with some sample cases. For detailed and convinient study two different  cases are selected, first sample case is a simple damped exponential signal and second sample case is  12   

numerical data from wire scatterer. These two cases are considered for numerical study of MPM and for  MPM  algorithm  with  multiple  look  direction.  Damped  exponential  signals  are  developed  with  specific  requirement for both single and multiple look direction. Single damped exponential signal is developed  for MPM algorithm and Multiple look direction algorithm has two different damped exponential signal  for two different looks, which has same poles and different residues magnitude. From the strength of  residues  the  signal  can  be  discriminated.  Second  sample  case  was  the  data  from  wire  scatterer.  The  specification  of  this  sample  is  from  the  reference  [6].  The  parameters  extracted  from  algorithm  with  these  sample  signals  helps  to  know  efficiency  and  accuracy  of  the  MPM  algorithm.    With  the  help  of  numerical  study  with  sample  signals  we  can  come  to  the  conclusion  for  the  chances  of  using  UWB  technologies for breast cancer detection.    

2.2.aTest Case1‐Damping Exponential Signals   For better understanding of working of MPM algorithm it is always good to deal with simple case first. A  simple damped exponential signal is generated with matlab. The damped exponential signal with known  signal  parameters  is  given  to  developed  MPM  algorithm.    The  main  property  of  MPM  algorithm  is  to  derive  signal  parameters  such  as  poles  and  residues  of  given  known  input  signal.  The  verification  and  testing of matrix pencil method algorithm is made with the simple example cases as shown below.   In this case, the synthetic data (damped exponential signal) is taken,                                                s(t) 

β)t                                                                    (1) 

s (t) =  damped exponential signal  Ai    = Residue  β     =  ‐α + jωi  α     = damping factor  ω     = angular frequencies.     

2.2.bTest Case2‐Wire Data of 1m  In  the  second  case,  numerical  data  of  a  wire  scatterer  is  considered.  This  sample  is  a  bit  complicated  when  compared  to  case  1,  but  which  provides  more  detailed  study  and  understands the working  and  efficiency of MPM algorithm. Here, response from the wire (wired data) with wire length, L = 1m and  two different look angles,   = 15⁰ and 75⁰ are provided. The data set of wire has frequency range from  4.39MHz to 9GHz with equally spaced 2048 number of samples.  The response signal of wire scatterer  with  above  specification  is  given  to  MPM  algorithm  for  parameter  estimation.  In  [6]  for  better  understanding of results, parameter extracted using another method called Method of Moments, which  is solely depends on the target geometry and dielectric properties are also considered and is included in  13   

and    explained  in  numerical  study  part  of  the  report.  Extracted  parameters  using  MPM  algorithm  for  sample  case  2  is  compared  with  results  of  Method  of  Moments  and  Matrix  Pencil  Method  for  two  different angles.  

 

   

 

 

Figure 2: Test Case‐ 1m wire 

2.2.cBreast Cancer Detection  The breast tumor in the breast volume is studied. Three different cases are considered, breast volume  with no  tumor,  10mm  tumor  and  15mm  tumor.  The breast  volume  of  6cm  hemisphere with  tumor  is  considered  with  18  plane  wave  sources  around  with  seperation  of  20°  each.  The  breast  volume  is  illuminated with the frequency of 23MHz to 3GHz with 128 samples in frequency domain (256 samples  in time domain). Each time, one plane wave source is considered and the corresponding scattered far‐ field  in  the  18  directions  are  computed.  [10].  The  electromagnetic  response  is  computed  in  the  frequency domain and the time domain response are obtained via an inverse Fourier Transofrm of the  frequency  data.  Both  circular  and  linear  polarization  are  considered.  These  datas  are  processed  with  matrix  pencil  method  by  considering  multiple  aspect  and  polarimetric  data.  Multiple  aspect  datas  are  considered in a way that the transient responses from all the 18 look direction with certain polarization  state. Polarimetric datas are transient response from a particular look direction and by considering the  datas  from  circular  or  linear  polarization  state  [10].  From  this  case  study,  it  can  be  said  whether  the  better parameter  extraction can  done with multiple aspect data or polarimetric data.  

14   

   

 

 

 

Figure 3: Simulation setup for Breast Cancer Detection in FEKO 

15   

3. Algorithm  This chapter describes the flow of Matrix Pencil method with regards to the case of single and various  input signals. The procedure of Matrix pencil method varies according to noise level in an input signal  and reacts better even in noisy situation. In absence of noise, parameter of estimation can get through  in a simple way and the procedure of algorithm flows an another way for a noisy situation. In our project  we include Matrix pencil method which treats single set of data and also use an algorithm multiple look  direction for noisy condition which are as follows.  

3.1 Matrix Pencil Method For Single transient response    The  term  pencil  originated  with  Gantmacher  [2],  similar  to  Gantmacher’s  definition  for  matrix  pencil,  with  another  entity  wehn  combining  two  functions  defined  on  a  common  interval,  with  a  scalar  parameter, λ [2].                                     f (t, λ) = g(t) + λh(t)               (2)  f(t,  λ)  is  called  as  a  pencil  of  functions  g(t)  and  h(t),  parameterized  by  λ.  In  the  case  of  parameter  extraction,  pencil  of  function  contains  most  important  information  about  poles  of  given  input  signal.   Total least matrix pencil method is found to be more superior, simple and more robust to noisy signal  [2]. The main objective of this method is to findout the poles Z, residues R and model order M of noise  contaminated data y(t).  In  this  implemetation  of  total  least  square  matrix  pencil  method,  initially  the  noise  contaminated  response signal collected which is specified as x(k). For the reason of developement of algorithm, data  x(k) is replaced by y(k) for the formation of matrix [Y1] and [Y2].   Next, the formation of data matrix [Y] is done from noisy data matrix [Y1] and [Y2] and is obtained as  mentioned below. 

 

 

        (3) 

Note that, formation of matrix [Y1] and [Y2] is obtained from [Y] by deleting the last column and first  column from [Y] matrix respectively. The dimension of data matrix [Y] is given as (N‐L)x(L+1), where N is  number of samples taken from the response signal and the parameter L must be choosen between N/3  and  N/2  for  efficient  noise  filtering  and  for  these  values  of  L,  the  variance  in  the  parameter  poles  because of noise has been found to be minimum [2].   16   

Once  after  the  formation  data  matrix  [Y],  singular  value  decomposition  of  matrix  [Y]  must  be  done.  Singular value decompostion is a process of factorizing a matrix in the form   

 

 

 

[Y]=[U][∑][V]*     

(4) 

Here, [U] and [V] are said to be unitary matrices, where [U] comprised of eigen vectors of [Y][Y]* and [V]  matrix has eigen vectors of [Y]*[Y]  and [∑] is a diagonal matrix which has singular value of [Y].  In  this  stage,  estimation  of  parameter  model  order  M  is  done.  The  procedure  of  finding  M  varies  according to input m value, when input m value is set greater than zero  the model order M that is the  number of estimated parameters are same as input model order. The way of finding model order M is  different when input m is negative. In case of m less than zero, one consider the ratio of various singular  values to the largest one. The singular values are represented as σc and largest singular value which is  the  first  singular  value  is  given  as  σmax.  The  model  order  M  can  be  estimated  with  the  following  equation.   

 

 

 

 

σc σ max

 ≈ 

          (5) 

Where  p  is  the  number  of  significant  decimal  digits  in  the  data.  The  ratio  of  singular  value  to  its    and  those  singular  values  are  considered  for  the  maximum  must  be  approximately  equal  to  reconstuction of the data. For example, if the data is accurate up to 4 significant decimal digits, then the  singular values for which the ratio  less than 10 to the power of ‐4 are considered to be noisy data and  these datas must not be used for the reconstuction of the data. So the selection of singular values which  is approximated with the above equations helps in parameter estimation effectively.    The next process is to find out the matrix [Y1] and [Y2], for this we consider the filtered matrix [V’] which  is constructed in a way it comprises only M dominant right singular vectors of matrix [V]. The remaining  right  singular vectors of matrix  (i.e) from M+1 to L  are neglected as they  are smaller. Inorder to form  [Y1] and [Y2] matrix, [V1’] and [V2’] filtered matrix must be derived from [V’] by deleting its last row and  first row respectively. So,    

 

[Y1] = [U][∑’][V1’]*         (6) 

 

 

[y2] = [U][∑’][V2’]*        (7) 

In the above equation, [∑’] is obtained from M columns of [∑] that is by considering only M dominant  singular values [2].  Once after finding the matrices [Y1] and [Y2], Matrix pencil equation must be solved to accomplish its  eigen values which is described below [2],   

 

{[Y2] – λ[Y1]}LxM => {[Y1]=[Y2] – λ[I]}MxM’     17 

 

The eigen values which we attained with above equation will be equivalent to the eigen velues of the  following matrix,   

 

{[V2’]* – λ[V1’]*}LxM => {[V1]}{[V2]} – λ[I]    

An above approach of construe the Matrix pencil equation is more transparent in obtaining poles with  minimum  variance  in  the  presence  of  noise,  typically  up  to  20‐25  dB  of  signal  to  noise  ratio  can  be  handled  effectively  and  simpler  than  prony  method  [2].  Once  after  retrieving  the  model  order  M  and  poles Z, the residues are solved from the following least square problem, 

 

 

         (8) 

Therefore, Matrix Pencil Method algorithm for estimating the signal parameters such as poles, residues  of the desired target is clearly expained. 

3.2 Matrix pencil Method for multiple signals  This method is an attempt to study more about the target from many aspects like many look directions  and  different  polarization.  In  this  method,  target  is  surrounded  by  many  antennas  placed  in  certain  interval. One antenna acts as transmitter and rest of the antennas take the position of receiver. All the  antennas  takes  a  turn  as  tansmitter  and  receiver.  The  data  from  the  target  are  collected  by  all  the  receiver  and  processed  in  time  domain.  The  poles  recorded  are  independent  of  look  directions  and  polarization, so here common single set of poles are obtained with different amplitudes. It is believed  that  parameter  extraction  by  multiple  aspect  helps  in  easy  parameter  extraction.  The  following  is  an  MPM algorithm that process these multiple aspect data.  For  the  algorithm  development,  the  transient  response  of  length  N+1  and  k  look  directions  are  considered. the response is the noise contaminated data so Total least square Matrix pencil method is  preferrable. The first step is to form a matrix [D] from the noise contaminated data, where [D1] matrix  can be obtained from [D] by eliminating the last row and matrix [D2] is by deleting the first row of [D]  matrix respectively.  The data matrix [D] looks as follows [5], 

18   

 

  (9) 

 

Next step deals with factorization of matrix [D] by singular value decomposition, it is done according to  [5]  

 

 

    

Where [U]&[V]* are two orthogonal matrix, whereas [Σ] has the singular values of [D] matrix. In order to  combat the noise effect, model order M must be obtained for matrix filtering. M can be obtained in the  same way as it was discussed in the above algorithm. Singular value filtering is done by retaining the M  dominant  value  in  the  matrix  [Σ].  With  the  filtered  matrix,  new  matrix  [D1],  [D2]  are  formed  and  processed in the matrix pencil equation,    

 

[D2] ‐ λ[D1] 

The poles are obtained from the above equation. Once the poles and model order is known it is easy to  find out the amplitude value from the following equation [5],   

 

                                (10) 

   

19   

4. Numerical Study and Results:  4.1. Test Case1‐ Damping Exponential Signals:   In this case, the synthetic data (damped exponential signal) is taken,                                                 (t) 

β)t                                                                    (11) 

 (t) =  damped exponential signal  Ai    = Residue  β     =  ‐α + jωi   α     = damping factor  ω     = angular frequencies.    The above damped exponential signal is taken as a sample with order  M = 6, amplitude, A = {1, 2, 3}, α =  {2, 3, 4} and the frequency, f = {4, 5, 6} with ω=2*pi*f for the better understanding.  Input is given to  MPM  algorithm  and  the  parameters  like  poles  and  residues  are  obtained.  The  estimation  of  the  parameter  is  done  for  the  different  modes.  The  number  of  poles  and  residues  are  decided  with  the  factor called Model order with the condition say, 

σc σ max

 ≈ 

                                                                            (12) 

Where,  σc =  sigular values of the data matrix                  σmax = maximum (i.e) the first sigular value                 p   =  number of significant decimal digits.  The model order is selected,  when the fraction of the singular value with its maximum one is less than  . For example, consider m= 2 , σmax = 58 and the number of singular values  must  or equal to the  be, σc  ≤  0.58. In the case of M < 0, the fraction of singular value σc and maximum singular value σmax  must be greater than M.  

σc σ max

 > M                                                                            (13) 

Here  the  extraction  of  poles  and  residues  were  attained  in  an  efficient  manner  with  MPM.  For  the  verification purpose, reconstruction of the signal is also done and shown with factor called VAF.   In the table below, poles and residues are obtained for the various M and the parameter extraction is  done  more  effectively  for  the  M  =  ‐5,  ‐3  ‐1,  4,  6,  8,  10.  When  we  consider  the  case  of  M  =  ‐5,    by  implementing  the  value  of  M  in  the  above  condition  (3)  which  leads  to  the  number  of  poles  and  20   

residues.  For M = 2, the poles and residues are extracted with the condition (2). The extracted poles and  residues can be clearly seen in the table 1(a)&1(b).  Table 1 : parameters for the damped exponential signal  M=‐5  VAF =   100  pole =     ‐2.0000   25.1327     ‐2.0000  ‐25.1327     ‐3.0000   31.4159     ‐3.0000  ‐31.4159     ‐4.0000   37.6991     ‐4.0000  ‐37.6991    residue =      1.0000    0.0000      1.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000    0.0000      3.0000    0.0000      3.0000   ‐0.0000   

M=‐3  VAF =   100  pole =     ‐2.0000   25.1327     ‐2.0000  ‐25.1327     ‐3.0000   31.4159     ‐3.0000  ‐31.4159     ‐4.0000   37.6991     ‐4.0000  ‐37.6991    residue =      1.0000    0.0000      1.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000    0.0000      3.0000    0.0000      3.0000   ‐0.0000 

M=‐1  VAF =   100  pole =     ‐2.0000   25.1327     ‐2.0000  ‐25.1327     ‐3.0000   31.4159     ‐3.0000  ‐31.4159     ‐4.0000   37.6991     ‐4.0000  ‐37.6991    residue =      1.0000    0.0000      1.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000    0.0000      3.0000    0.0000      3.0000   ‐0.0000 

M=2  VAF =   95.8660  pole =     ‐6.3272   33.1170     ‐6.3272  ‐33.1170            residue =      6.4034    0.1868      6.4034   ‐0.1868 

Table 2 : parameters for the damped exponential signal  M=4  VAF =  98.7306  pole =     ‐2.4068   24.1538     ‐2.4068  ‐24.1538     ‐5.7587   35.6636     ‐5.7587  ‐35.6636          residue =     0.8223    0.6629      0.8223   ‐0.6629      5.1870   ‐0.8183      5.1870    0.8183 

M=6  VAF =  100  pole =     ‐2.0000   25.1327     ‐2.0000  ‐25.1327     ‐3.0000   31.4159     ‐3.0000  ‐31.4159     ‐4.0000   37.6991     ‐4.0000  ‐37.6991      residue =     1.0000    0.0000      1.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000    0.0000      3.0000    0.0000      3.0000   ‐0.0000 

M=8  VAF =  100  pole =      ‐2.0000    25.100     ‐2.0000   ‐25.100     ‐3.0000    31.400     ‐3.0000   ‐31.400     ‐4.0000    37.700     ‐4.0000   ‐37.700         residue =       1.0000    0.0000      1.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000    0.0000      3.0000    0.0000      3.0000   ‐0.0000   

M=10  VAF=100  Pole =       ‐2.0000    25.100     ‐2.0000   ‐25.100     ‐3.0000    31.400     ‐3.0000   ‐31.400     ‐4.0000    37.700     ‐4.0000   ‐37.700       residue =         1.0000    0.0000      1.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000   ‐0.0000      2.0000    0.0000      3.0000   ‐0.0000      3.0000    0.0000          21 

 

  4.2. Test Case2‐Wire Data:   In case of second example of resonance based target recognition method is taken which also considers  late time response from the target scattering based on singularity expansion method(SEM), the target  tesonance  are  purely  depends  on  the  target  composition  and  geometry  not  on  the  incident  aspect  angle.  In  the example,  response  from  the  wire  (wired data)  with  L  =  1m  and  the  angle    =  15⁰  and  75⁰  and  frequency range from 4.39MHz to 9GHz with equally spaced 2048 samples in frequency domain.  The  data  set  for  this  wired  response  is  given  to  MPM  algorithm  for  parameter  estimation.  Here,  the  parameter  extracted  using  Method  of  Moments  and  MPM,  which  is  solely  depends  on  the  target  geometry and dielectric properties are taken as the reference from [6] and added in the table.    

M     MOM  o reference  d e  

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  1 0 

    MPM  reference 

‐0.260±j2.91  ‐0.381±j6.01  ‐0.468±j9.06  ‐0.538±j12.2  ‐0.600±j15.3  ‐0.654±j18.4  ‐0.704±j21.5  ‐0.749±j24.6  ‐0.792±j27.7  ‐0.832±j30.8 

‐0.252±j2.87  ‐0.373±j5.93  ‐0.444±j9.05  ‐0.545±j12.1           ‐  ‐0.881±j17.6  ‐0.850±j21.6           ‐  ‐1.005±j28.6           ‐ 

                      MPM              MPM            MPM                                                                         I/p  m = 20               O/p  M = 20    I/p  m = ‐3              O/p M = 43  I/p m = ‐4            O/p  M = 178                      VAF = 100%                    VAF = 99.99%                    VAF = 100%  Poles 

Residues 

Poles 

Residues 

Poles 

Residues 

‐0.2533±j2.8733  ‐0.3733±j5.9333  ‐0.4400±j9.0267  ‐0.5433±j12.110  ‐0.6200±j15.953  ‐0.6400±j18.330  ‐0.6900±j21.526                 ‐  ‐0.7933±j28.510                 ‐ 

     49.64      13.37      2.044      11.63      1.278      2.804      4.647          ‐      3.253          ‐

‐0.2533±j2.8733 ‐0.3733±j5.9333 ‐0.4267±j9.0300 ‐0.5567±j12.123 ‐0.5728±j15.217 ‐0.6320±j18.327 ‐0.6900±j21.433          ‐ ‐0.781±j27.688 ‐0.818±j30.838      

    49.64      13.28        2.155      11.18      1.385      2.993      4.587          ‐     2.624      2.131 

‐0.2533±j2.8733 ‐0.3700±j5.9333 ‐0.4567±j9.0067 ‐0.5267±j12.103 ‐0.5733±j15.216 ‐0.6333±j18.326 ‐0.6900±j21.433            ‐  ‐0.7817±j27.688 ‐0.8167±j30.840

    49.69     13.21       2.197     11.14     1.395     2.844     4.635         ‐     2.792     1.771

Table 3:   = 15°  CNR for Different M.  The extraction of useful parameters are completely based on the strength of the residues and is difficult  when the residue value is less or 0. The residue values are also provided in the table below in order to  show the strength of the poles. The model order considered here are, M = 20, ‐3, ‐4. Most of the useful  poles are aquired better in the case of M = ‐4 and reconstuction of the signal is 100% as shown below in  the table(2). Residues here shows the strength of the poles. In the case of M = ‐4, number of resonant  22   

poles  are  approximarely  178.  Resonance  values  are  obtained  and  compared  with  the  verified  with  reference  poles.  The  reconstruction  of  the  signal  and  pole  extraction  is  more  appropriate  when  it  is  compared with the proved one.   For  the  data  at  the  angle  15°  and  75°  is  provided  to  MPM  algorithm  with  different  M  values  are  considered.  The  number  of  obtained  poles  with  respect  to  the  input  order  is  also  shown  clearly.  The  poles for the different model order is compared and the poles obtained are mentioned.   For    = 15°, different M values are considered and the poles obtained are mentioned in Table 3.   For    = 75°, different M values are considered and the poles obtained are mentioned in Table 4.    

Mode       MOM  reference 

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10 

‐0.260±j2.91  ‐0.381±j6.01  ‐0.468±j9.06  ‐0.538±j12.2  ‐0.600±j15.3  ‐0.654±j18.4  ‐0.704±j21.5  ‐0.749±j24.6  ‐0.792±j27.7  ‐0.832±j30.8 

 

    MPM  reference 

                      MPM       I/p m = 55                O/p M  = 55                    VAF = 99.59% 

‐0.252±j2.87 ‐0.372±j5.93 ‐0.455±j9.01 ‐0.525±j12.1 ‐0.585±j15.2 ‐0.637±j18.3 ‐0.692±j21.4 ‐0.733±j24.6 ‐0.785±j27.7 ‐0.817±j30.8

 

           MPM     I/p  m = ‐2              O/p  M  = 86                    VAF = 100% 

         MPM              I/P m = ‐3               O/p  M  = 579                    VAF = 99.99% 

Poles 

Residues Poles 

Residues  Poles 

Residues

‐0.2486±j2.8788 ‐0.3849±j5.9277 ‐0.4460±j9.0118 ‐0.5439±j12.112 ‐0.5769±j15.195 ‐0.6557±j18.340 ‐0.6953±j21.410 ‐0.7405±j24.597     ‐0.8161±j27.664 ‐0.8031±j30.869    

    2.394     4.434     5.467     7.053     7.395     8.509     8.739     8.984     9.792     8.679

    2.450      4.254      5.675      6.719      7.639      8.193      8.758      8.978      9.225      9.234 

    2.441     4.236     5.655     6.732     7.633     8.164     8.846     8.779     9.324     9.123

‐0.2525±j2.8732 ‐0.3703±j5.9312 ‐0.4569±j9.0120 ‐0.5228±j12.105 ‐0.5871±j15.207 ‐0.6362±j18.317 ‐0.6919±j21.436 ‐0.7345±j24.559     ‐0.7818±j27.692 ‐0.8211±j30.832    

‐0.2517±j2.8739 ‐0.3711±j5.9342 ‐0.4558±j9.0123 ‐0.5247±j12.105 ‐0.5856±j15.207 ‐0.6352±j18.315 ‐0.6963±j21.438 ‐0.7258±j24.562   ‐0.7873±j27.698 ‐0.8158±j30.833

Table 4:   = 75°  CNR for Different M. 

Single  response  extraction  is  done  with  matrix  Pencil  Method  algorithm  for  the  data  from  the  wire  scartter. The poles obtained are corresponds to the wire target at different look direction of 15° and 75°.  The  response  signals  are  processed  one  after  one  since  we  could  use  MPM  which  can  perform  single  extraction.  So  for  the  simplification  of  this  process,  the  trasient  responses  from  two  different  look  directions are being processed in MPM algorithm which handles multiple signals. The CNR extraction is  more straight forward, single set CNR is obained as it is aspect independent and 2 set of residues are  obtained  which  corresponsds  to  two  different  look  directions  (15°  and  75°).  The  ectracted  CNR  with  multiple aspect are explanined in multiple aspect extraction.  

23   

4.3 Breast Cancer Detection:  The data from the breast volume with No tumor, 10 mm tumor and 15 mm tumor are considered. The  poles  are  extracted  for  no  tumor  case.  Response  signal  comprises  of  datas  releted  to  18  different  aspects.  Each  aspect  has  its  own  8  polarization  (4  in  Linear  and  4  in  Circular).  All  the  response  signal  from  18  aspect  with  8  different  polarizations  are  processed  and  poles  are  extracted.  so,  18*8=144  number of extractions are done. Dominant poles are judged by Energy Ratio (ER) and verified by using  Time Frequency analysis plot. Energy ratio of each resonant mode is obtained by dividing energy level of  each  resonant  mode  by  sum  of  energy  level  of  all  the  resonant  modes.  Dominant  poles  for  no  tumor  extraction with the energy ratio for all 18 aspects (time_transmit_receiver: time_1_1 to time_1_18) with  different polarization (VV, HH, VH, HV, LL, RR, LR, RL) are tabulated below.    

 

 

 

  Time domain    response 

  Single Extraction 

   

Time_1_1(tvv)  Time_1_1(thh)  Time_1_1(thv)  Time_1_1(tvh)  Time_1_1(tvv)  Time_1_1(tll)  Time_1_1(trr)  Time_1_1(tlr)  Time_1_1(rl) to  time_1_18() 

     

 

         

Multiple set  of CNR 

   

 

 

Figure 4: Strategies for Single response extraction 

At the end of extraction, set of CNR are obtained and It is most important to find out the most dominant  poles.  In  our  project  there  are  two  strategies  are  implemented  to  get  the  most  domonant  poles  corresponds to the  required target. Energy Ratio (ER) gives the  information  about the most dominant  poles, it is defined as the enery level of each mode to the sum of energy level of all resonant modes.  Mode  with  higher  energy  is  the  most  dominant  pole  of  the  specific  target  and  represented  in  percentage.   24   

TF analysis is a technique that consist of both time and frequency domain simultaneously. TF plot shows  the most intensive frequency component among all the modes which helps in finding the dominant CNR  of the target. TF plot looks as follows,  

Real part

Signal in time 0.01 0 -0.01 Linear scale

SP, Lh=16, Nf=67.5, lin. scale, imagesc, Threshold=5% 3000

Frequency [MHz]

Energy spectral density

2500 2000 1500 1000 500

15 10

-3

   

0

5 x 10

 

 

0.004 0.006 0.008 0.01 0.012 0.014 0.016 Time [µs]

 

 Figure 4: TF Plot Model 

  From  the  above  plot,  it  is  very  clear  that  the  frequency  of  1GHz  is  more  intensive  and  also  it  posses  higher  energy  among  all  the  component.  So  by  looking  at  TF  plot  the  most  dominant  poles  can  be  identified.   The most dominant CNR for No tumor case for all the look directions are tabulated below with its Energy  ratio.   Time_1_1  Poles  ‐3.272±44.306  ‐4.545±33.489  ‐4.603±54.715  ‐8.526±23.571 

ER(VV) (%)  5.89  89.21  3.36  1.53 

  Poles  ‐3.425±22.435  ‐3.085±29.99  ‐3.666±53.072  ‐4.611±42.22 

ER(HH)  64.17  1.23  0.07  33.62 

  25   

Poles  ‐2.591±54.291  ‐4.501±43.719  ‐5.523±25.358  ‐4.182±35.213 

ER(VH)  0.03  0.22  0.003  99.76 

Poles  ‐3.272±44.306  ‐4.545±33.489  ‐4.603±54.715  ‐8.526±23.571 

ER(HV)  5.89  89.21  3.36  1.53 

Poles  ‐3.647±27.892  ‐3.868±43.381  ‐4.200±53.506 

ER(LL)  2.339  96.9  0.736 

Poles  ‐3.652±27.88  ‐3.865±43.386  ‐4.194±53.499 

ER(RR)  2.179  97.29  0.49 

Poles  ‐3.635±52.054  ‐3.979±32.221  ‐4.057±25.021 

ER(LR)  0.03  3.7  96.2 

Poles  ‐3.642±53.061  ‐3.953±32.160  ‐4.057±25.021 

ER(RL)  0.028  4.044  95.916 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 5: time_1_1 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations 

Time_1_2  Poles  ‐3.361±44.293  ‐4.607±33.607  ‐5.620±54.090  ‐8.593±23.813 

ER(VV)  4.39  90.82  2.26  2.45 

  26   

Poles  ‐3.512±28.423  ‐4.412±42.146  ‐3.646±51.527  ‐3.337±25.725 

ER(HH)  11.45  9.06  0.006  79.484 

Poles  ‐2.581±53.895  ‐5.923±23.967  ‐4.499±43.725  ‐5.519±34.430 

ER(VH)  0.03  0.85  0.003  98.76 

Poles  ‐3.361±44.293  ‐4.607±33.607  ‐5.620±54.090  ‐8.593±23.813 

ER(HV)  4.39  90.82  2.26  2.45 

Poles  ‐3.561±28.02  ‐4.397±52.917  ‐3.815±43.230 

ER(LL)  1.88  0.79  97.2 

Poles  ‐3.572±27.978  ‐4.410±52.827  ‐3.821±43.241   

ER(RR)  2.44  0.78  96.75   

Poles  ‐3.220±51.183  ‐3.914±23.191  ‐3.627±46.936  ‐4.757±32.352 

ER(LR)  0.028  91.16  3.22  5.584 

 

 

 

 

 

  Poles  ‐2.632±53.706  ‐4.058±24.187  ‐4.306±31.803       

ER(RL)  0.411  93.31  6.26  Table 6: time_1_2 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations  27 

 

Time_1_3  Poles  ‐2.032±53.513  ‐4.740±33.373  ‐3.640±42.983  ‐9.365±25.605 

ER(VV)  0.003  5.21  0.154  94.56 

  Poles  ‐2.181±53.209  ‐3.580±28.456  ‐4.445±41.442  ‐9.50±22.892 

ER(HH)  0.823  95.625  0.982  2.36 

Poles  ‐2.716±54.199  ‐4.768±43.629  ‐5.820±33.706 

ER(VH)  0.05  2.36  97.32 

Poles  ‐2.032±53.513  ‐4.740±33.373  ‐3.640±42.983  ‐9.365±25.605 

ER(HV)  0.003  5.21  0.154  94.56 

Poles  ‐3.725±42.42  ‐3.562±28.231 

ER(LL)  99.68  0.034 

Poles  ‐3.740±42.411  ‐3.565±28.236 

ER(RR)  99.70  0.031 

Poles  ‐3.304±25.460  ‐3.540±54.728  ‐4.571±36.835  ‐4.955±43.524 

ER(LR)  0.026  0.63  74.4  25.48 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28   

  Poles  ‐2.939±54.35  ‐3.535±35.259  ‐3.683±43.296  ‐3.872±25.52   

ER(RL)  0.69  1.213  0.002  97.94 

Table 7: time_1_3 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations 

Time_1_4  Poles  ‐2.136±53.663  ‐3.228±44.242  ‐4.8143±33.458  ‐9.4299±25.223 

ER(VV)  0.0004  0.0001  2.56  97.43 

  Poles  ‐7.802±22.961  ‐3.648±28.371  ‐3.291±52.143  ‐5.419±40.762   

ER(HH)  0.03  98.88  1.01  0.06 

Poles  ‐4.854±43.155  ‐5.685±33.905  ‐6.102±26.803  ‐5.112±53.555   

ER(VH)  0.03  99.87  0.124  0.001 

Poles  ‐2.136±53.663  ‐3.228±44.242  ‐4.8143±33.458  ‐9.4299±27.223   

ER(HV)  0.0004  0.0001  2.56  97.43 

Poles  ‐2.740±53.172  ‐4.721±40.886  ‐4.346±27.495 

ER(LL)  1.36  0.06  98.57 

 

 

 

29   

Poles  ‐2.748±53.150  ‐4.696±40.482  ‐4.377±27.465   

ER(RR)  1.29  0.08  98.33 

Poles  ‐3.212±27.751  ‐4.586±41.931  ‐2.632±54.11  ‐4.881±33.001     

ER(LR)  0.21  0.004  1.217  98.54 

 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐2.550±53.83  0.82  ‐3.887±28.294  96.53  ‐4.062±43.054  0.02  ‐4.986±32.992  2.34      Table 8: time_1_4 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations    Time_1_5  Poles  ‐2.330±53.379  ‐3.298±44.045  ‐4.841±33.134  ‐8.256±24.162   

ER(VV)  0.003  0.0013  0.198  99.79   

  Poles  ‐3.591±28.415  ‐4.337±51.917  ‐7.1593±40.368   

ER(HH)  99.86  0.13  0.013 

Poles  ‐4.268±24.402  ‐2.576±54.125  ‐4.842±42.017  ‐5.328±33.055 

ER(VH)  96.23  0.001  2.03  1.20 

 

30   

  Poles  ‐2.330±53.379  ‐3.298±44.045  ‐4.841±33.134  ‐8.256±24.162   

ER(HV)  0.003  0.0013  0.198  99.79 

Poles  ‐2.590±52.291  ‐3.822±28.500  ‐5.065±43.428 

ER(LL)  0.002  3.736  96.26   

Poles  ‐2.594±52.31  ‐3.819±28.501  ‐5.069±43.423 

ER(RR)  0.003  3.600  96.27 

Poles  ‐3.852±26.211  ‐4.685±34.158 

ER(LR)  1.43  98.54 

 

 

 

  Poles  ‐2.550±53.83  ‐3.887±28.294  ‐4.062±43.054  ‐4.986±32.992   

ER(RL)  0.08  2.10  0.09  97.41    Table 9: time_1_5 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations 

 

31   

Time_1_6  Poles  ‐2.699±43.194  ‐4.751±53.67  ‐9.2822±34.201 

ER(VV)  0.025  0.06  99.91 

  Poles  ‐2.918±28.488  ‐7.085±42.564 

ER(HH)  99.23  0.74 

Poles  ‐2.430±54.331  ‐2.829±41.186  ‐4.382±34.844  ‐5.112±22.312 

ER(VH)  0.0001  0.01  92.52  7.477 

Poles  ‐2.699±43.194  ‐4.751±53.67  ‐9.2822±34.201 

ER(HV)  0.025  0.06  99.91 

Poles  ‐4.361±27.949  ‐5.266±43.284  ‐7.745±52.144 

ER(LL)  99.664  0.3356  0.0001 

Poles  ‐4.360±27.956  ‐5.28±43.272  ‐7.669±52.163 

ER(RR)  99.791  0.27  0.0001 

Poles  ‐2.610±34.207  ‐3.632±28.26 

ER(LR)  99.97  0.02 

 

 

 

 

 

 

32   

  Poles  ‐1.549±42.77  ‐3.88±28.66  ‐2.715±35.07   

ER(RL)  98.396  0.33  1.09 

Table 10: time_1_6 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations 

Time_1_7  Poles  ‐2.935±51.326  ‐3.251±40.471  ‐6.281±34.171 

ER(VV)  0.0001  0.298  99.57 

  Poles  ‐2.067±52.837  ‐4.104±28.553  ‐5.571±41.890 

ER(HH)  0.0001  98.56  1.32 

Poles  ‐2.698±42.801  ‐5.687±52.830  ‐5.815±30.132 

ER(VH)  1.23  0.009  98.23 

Poles  ‐2.935±51.326  ‐3.251±40.471  ‐6.281±34.171 

ER(HV)  0.0001  0.298  99.57 

Poles  ‐4.525±53.587  ‐3.310±29.296  ‐4.627±42.511 

ER(LL)  0.0002  99.90  0.01 

Poles  ‐4.389±52.981  ‐3.299±29.593  ‐4.587±43.256 

ER(RR)  0.0001  99.88  0.02 

 

 

 

 

  33   

Poles  ‐2.317±43.067  ‐3.656±32.828 

ER(LR)  0.12  99.879 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐1.135±52.317  0.41  ‐3.366±42.401  7.99  ‐2.994±37.492  91.52  ‐3.936±28.634  0.01    Table 11: time_1_7 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations    Time_1_8  Poles  ‐5.341±33.557  ‐5.576±42.889  ‐5.477±58.581 

ER(VV)  93.43  6.56  0.0002 

  Poles  ‐4.321±28.575  ‐5.373±40.783  ‐4.554±52.259 

ER(HH)  98.19  1.726  0.077 

Poles  ‐2.568±54.304  ‐2.430±43.250  ‐5.053±35.158  ‐5.143±22.453 

ER(VH)  0.001  0.29  56.02  43.66 

Poles  ‐5.341±33.557  ‐5.576±42.889  ‐5.477±58.581 

ER(HV)  93.43  6.56  0.0002 

Poles  ‐2.994±29.184  ‐5.1062±41.95  ‐5.956±53.994 

ER(LL)  99.02  0.91  0.0002 

 

 

 

  34   

Poles  ‐3.045±29.296  ‐5.141±41.932  ‐5.821±54.121 

ER(RR)  99.04  0.87  0.0002 

Poles  ‐3.799±29.434  ‐4.298±42.200 

ER(LR)  99.498  0.5 

 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐2.205±32.257  97.96  ‐2.803±53.219  1.34  ‐3.035±42.966  0.52    Table 12: time_1_8 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations    Time_1_9  Poles  ‐3.272±56.127  ‐4.026±43.915  ‐5.392±33.064 

ER(VV)  0.012  9.60  90.25 

  Poles  ‐4.434±28.441  ‐5.396±40.562  ‐5.614±55.101 

ER(HH)  99.78  0.21  0.005 

Poles  ‐2.530±43.874  ‐3.080±54.513  ‐4.672±22.957  ‐4.821±35.894 

ER(VH)  0.03  0.001  59.39  40.59 

Poles  ‐3.272±56.127  ‐4.026±43.915  ‐5.392±33.064 

ER(HV)  0.012  9.60  90.25 

 

 

 

35   

  Poles  ‐‐4.789±55.562  ‐4.526±43.714  ‐4.992±29.282 

ER(LL)  0.01  19.99  79.99 

Poles  ‐4.882±55.591  ‐4.426±43.158  ‐4.725±29.782 

ER(RR)  0.009  20.32  79.54 

Poles  ‐3.811±29.294  ‐3.940±42.755 

ER(LR)  99.87  0.098 

Poles  ‐2.871±53.752  ‐3.120±43.478  ‐3.949±29.350 

ER(RL)  0.09  2.02  97.85 

 

 

 

 

Table 13: time_1_9 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations 

  Time_1_10  Poles  ‐2.796±54.666  ‐3.999±43.954  ‐5.280±33.088 

ER(VV)  0.23  16.78  82.99 

  Poles  ‐3.161±54.577  ‐4.437±28.531  ‐5.705±43.497 

ER(HH)  0.0038  95.61  4.38 

Poles  ‐2.530±43.874  ‐3.080±54.513  ‐4.672±23.994  ‐5.213±34.213 

ER(VH)  0.32  0.002  2.63  97.53 

 

  36   

Poles  ‐2.796±54.666  ‐3.999±43.954  ‐5.280±33.088 

ER(HV)  0.23  16.78  82.99 

Poles  ‐4.105±54.694  ‐4.268±44.086  ‐4.953±29.051 

ER(LL)  0.39  18.09  81.45 

Poles  ‐4.113±54.698  ‐4.589±44.254  ‐5.012±29.531 

ER(RR)  0.4  18.52  81.01 

Poles  ‐3.349±43.137  ‐3.896±29.308 

ER(LR)  1.194  98.532 

Poles  ‐3.040±43.135  ‐3.896±29.306 

ER(RL)  2.89  97.02 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 14: time_1_10 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations 

Time_1_11  Poles  ‐3.275±56.134  ‐4.026±43.915  ‐5.329±33.064 

ER(VV)  0.26  16.71  83.02 

  Poles  ‐4.434±28.44  ‐5.396±40.563  ‐5.611±55.099 

ER(HH)  97.78  2.213  0.005 

 

37   

  Poles  ‐2.531±43.878  ‐3.095±52.521  ‐4.622±21.121  ‐4.832±35.912 

ER(VH)  1.23  0.01  60.78  38.02 

Poles  ‐3.275±56.134  ‐4.026±43.915  ‐5.329±33.064 

ER(HV)  0.26  16.71  83.02 

Poles  ‐2.542±52.030  ‐4.958±43.704  ‐3.089±29.297 

ER(LL)  0.41  18.98  80.45 

Poles  ‐2.567±30.084  ‐4.789±55.49  ‐4.723±43.753 

ER(RR)  0.48  19.49  79.99 

Poles  ‐2.874±53.760  ‐3.122±43.482  ‐3.950±29.359 

ER(LR)  1.001  0.89  97.76 

 

 

 

 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐3.937±42.758  1.12  ‐3.812±29.290  98.86      Table 15: time_1_11 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations  Time_1_12  Poles  ‐5.343±33.556  ‐5.572±42.881  ‐5.461±51.571 

ER(VV)  88.89  9.98  1.15 

    38   

  Poles  ‐4.322±28.573  ‐5.371±40.785  ‐4.553±55.250 

ER(HH)  98.38  1.58  0.0001 

Poles  ‐2.567±54.309  ‐2.4316±43.241  ‐5.048±35.150 

ER(VH)  0.002  56.46  43.53 

Poles  ‐5.343±33.556  ‐5.572±42.881  ‐5.461±51.571 

ER(HV)  88.89  9.98  1.15 

Poles  ‐3.018±29.27  ‐5.143±41.92  ‐5.569±53.994 

ER(LL)  98.67  1.22  0.001 

Poles  ‐2.997±29.210  ‐5.124±41.961  ‐5.463±53.874 

ER(RR)  99.02  0.92  0.001 

Poles  ‐2.801±53.21  ‐3.038±42.96  ‐4.844±35.488 

ER(LR)  1.99  3.02  94.968 

 

 

 

 

 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐3.806±30.431  99.51  ‐4.268±42.180  0.49    Table 16: time_1_12 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations      39   

Time_1_13  Poles  ‐3.247±40.474  ‐6.278±34.166 

ER(VV)  0.35  99.56 

  Poles  ‐2.076±52.827  ‐4.102±28.551  ‐5.574±41.888 

ER(HH)  0.0002  99.65  0.24 

Poles  ‐2.698±42.798  ‐5.699±52.806  ‐5.983±35.977 

ER(VH)  9.3  0.03  90.23 

Poles  ‐3.247±40.474  ‐6.278±34.166 

ER(HV)  0.35  99.56 

Poles  ‐4.531±53.586  ‐3.321±29.288  ‐4.615±42.522 

ER(LL)  0.0001  99.64  0.29 

Poles  ‐3.329±29.292  ‐4.721±42.991  ‐4.951±52.785 

ER(RR)  99.82  0.17  0.0001 

Poles  ‐1.152±52.334  ‐5.988±25.492  ‐3.374±42.397  ‐3.934±32.641 

ER(LR)  0.42  0.29  89.12  9.06 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40   

  Poles  ‐3.408±33.135  ‐2.311±43.073   

ER(RL)  93.25  6.67 

Table 17: time_1_13 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations 

  Time_1_14  Poles  ‐2.701±43.194  ‐4.749±55.679  ‐5.296±34.192 

ER(VV)  1.005  0.05  98.75 

  Poles  ‐3.917±28.488  ‐5.080±42.565 

ER(HH)  97.89  2.10 

Poles  ‐2.430±54.340  ‐2.837±41.182  ‐4.387±34.829 

ER(VH)  0.05  92.76  7.23 

Poles  ‐2.701±43.194  ‐4.749±55.679  ‐5.296±34.192 

ER(HV)  1.005  0.05  98.75 

Poles  ‐4.362±27.952  ‐5.288±43.288  ‐5.689±52.100 

ER(LL)  99.69  0.21  0.0002 

Poles  ‐4.372±27.949  ‐5.381±43.279  ‐5.221±52.186 

ER(RR)  99.71  0.17  0.0001 

 

 

 

 

  41   

  Poles  ‐2.531±42.689  ‐3.895±28.64  ‐4.212±36.285 

ER(LR)  0.097  1.90  97.99 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐3.577±33.574  99.89  ‐2.61±44.187  0.0001  ‐3.627±28.26  0.002      Table 18: time_1_14 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations  Time_1_15  Poles  ‐2.288±53.368  ‐3.273±44.10  ‐4.839±33.065  ‐7.238±23.920 

ER(VV)  0.36  0.002  3.99  95.65 

  Poles  ‐3.591±28.418  ‐4.332±51.92  ‐5.079±40.371 

ER(HH)  99.85  0.003  0.14 

Poles  ‐2.576±54.126  ‐4.845±42.016  ‐5.333±33.043  ‐5.053±23.125 

ER(VH)  0.02  1.03  98.99  0.001 

Poles  ‐2.288±53.368  ‐3.273±44.10  ‐4.839±33.065  ‐7.238±23.920 

ER(HV)  0.36  0.002  3.99  95.65 

Poles  ‐2.596±52.328  ‐3.818±28.501  ‐3.915±43.421 

ER(LL)  0.01  97.06  2.93 

 

 

 

42   

Poles  ‐2.583±52.307  ‐3.820±28.499  ‐3.992±43.582 

ER(RR)  0.04  96.35  3.61 

Poles  ‐2.551±53.828  ‐3.891±28.291  ‐4.048±46.050  ‐4.893±37.523 

ER(LR)  0.02  1.01  0.25  98.53 

 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐2.125±35.603  99.72  ‐3.206±27.151  0.04    Table 19: time_1_15 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations  Time_1_16  Poles  ‐2.145±53.684  ‐3.294±44.226  ‐4.820±33.460  ‐7.289±27.531 

ER(VV)  0.64  0.0002  2.89  96.26 

  Poles  ‐3.799±45.946  ‐3.648±28.367  ‐3.288±52.143  ‐5.422±23.562 

ER(HH)  0.85  96.89  1.96  0.14 

Poles  ‐4.859±43.158  ‐5.704±33.897  ‐5.986±52.846  ‐5.987±24.856 

ER(VH)  0.001  99.98  0.002  0.001 

Poles  ‐2.145±53.684  ‐3.294±44.226  ‐4.820±33.460  ‐7.289±27.531 

ER(HV)  0.64  0.0002  2.89  96.26 

 

 

  43   

Poles  ‐2.749±53.149  ‐4.365±27.467  ‐2.292±43.153 

ER(LL)  1.125  97.34  0.24 

Poles  ‐2.755±53.165  ‐4.335±27.506  ‐4.745±43.903 

ER(RR)  1.90  98.008  0.17 

Poles  ‐3.3524±54.795  ‐3.7135±24.915  ‐4.325±34.523  ‐3.953±42.625 

ER(LR)  0.06  98.88  1.01  0.03 

 

 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐3.375±25.703  0.03  ‐4.858±37.267  98.696  ‐4.306±42.324  0.12  ‐5.134±52.79  0.98    Table 20: time_1_16 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations  Time_1_17  Poles  ‐2.021±53.501  ‐3.662±42.984  ‐4.74±33.37  ‐6.846±25.359 

ER(VV)  1.652  0.192  8.98  89.17 

  Poles  ‐4.928±21.325  ‐2.175±53.206  ‐4.445±41.442  ‐3.580±28.454  Poles  ‐2.715±54.21  ‐4.751±43.632  ‐5.820±33.757  ‐5.923±26.262 

ER(HH)  8.03  0.124  0.208  91.619  ER(VH)  0.02  1.23  97.01  1.03 

  44   

Poles  ‐2.021±53.501  ‐3.662±42.984  ‐4.74±33.37  ‐6.846±25.359 

ER(HV)  1.652  0.192  8.98  89.17 

Poles  ‐3.743±42.422  ‐4.183±33.107 

ER(LL)  3.22  96.69 

Poles  ‐3.745±42.433  ‐3.559±32.230 

ER(RR)  2.31  97.68 

Poles  ‐2.926±54.371  ‐3.582±43.278  ‐3.555±28.252  ‐3.981±37.125 

ER(LR)  0.12  0.03  97.85  1.894 

 

 

 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐3.3026±27.471  1.81  ‐4.551±36.793  86.93  ‐4.953±43.501  5.98  ‐3.544±54.728  5.19    Table 21: time_1_17 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations  Time_1_18  Poles  ‐3.356±44.289  ‐4.609±33.605  ‐5.638±54.086  ‐9.254±26.317 

ER(VV)  6.89  88.21  3.36  1.53 

  Poles  ‐3.513±28.428  ‐4.413±42.148  ‐3.638±51.230  ‐4.328±25.716 

ER(HH)  11.43  9.24  0.006  79.254 

  45   

Poles  ‐2.583±53.886  ‐4.487±43.713  ‐5.542±25.702  ‐5.543±34.373 

ER(VH)  0.006  2.03  0.03  97.21 

Poles  ‐3.356±44.289  ‐4.609±33.605  ‐5.638±54.086  ‐9.254±26.317 

ER(HV)  6.89  88.21  3.36  1.53 

Poles  ‐2.855±55.469  ‐3.822±43.241  ‐3.372±28.002 

ER(LL)  0.339  96.9  2.36 

Poles  ‐3.819±43.233  ‐3.569±27.999  ‐2.998±54.891 

ER(RR)  96.61  2.55  0.394 

Poles  ‐2.633±53.708  ‐4.295±31.732  ‐3.171±43.621  ‐4.077±28.206 

ER(LR)  94.00  0.027  5.62  0.365 

 

 

 

 

  Poles  ER(RL)  ‐3.216±55.189  91.31  ‐3.609±46.905  3.47  ‐4.668±32.381  0.041  ‐3.922±28.156  5.167    Table 22: time_1_18 dominant CNR for 8 polarizations  From  the  above  tables,  the  most  dominant  poles  obtained  but  it  is  time  consuming  process.  So  it  is  preferrable to do multiple extraction with MPM algorithm which handles multiple signals.  

46   

4.4 Multiple aspect extraction:  The CNR extracted with single transient are time consuming process. So the extraction can be done by  utilizing multiple signals at once through MPM algorithm. For test case of 1m wire, the response from  the  two  aspect  15°  and  75°  are  processed  through  the  Matrix  pencil  method  and  poles  extraction  is  made. The major advantage with this method is time consumption. The extracted single set of CNRand  residues for 15° and 75° are tabulated below,       MOM reference      MPM reference 

MPM 

MPM (15°) 

MPM(75°) 

(m = ‐2 & M = 55) 

Residues (A1) 

Residues(A2) 

Poles (VAF=100%)  ‐0.260±j2.91 

‐0.252±j2.87 

‐0.2486±j2.8788 

     49.64 

     2.394 

‐0.381±j6.01 

‐0.373±j5.93 

‐0.3849±j5.9277 

     13.28   

     4.434 

‐0.468±j9.06 

‐0.444±j9.05 

‐0.4460±j9.0118 

     2.155 

     5.467 

‐0.538±j12.2 

‐0.545±j12.1 

‐0.5439±j12.112 

     11.18 

     7.053 

‐0.600±j15.3 

         ‐ 

‐0.5769±j15.195 

     1.385 

     7.395 

‐0.654±j18.4 

‐0.881±j17.6 

‐0.6557±j18.340 

     2.993 

     8.509 

‐0.704±j21.5 

‐0.850±j21.6 

‐0.6953±j21.410 

     4.587 

     8.739 

‐0.749±j24.6 

         ‐ 

‐0.7405±j24.597             3.629 

     8.984 

‐0.792±j27.7 

‐1.005±j28.6 

‐0.8161±j27.664 

     2.624 

     9.792 

‐0.832±j30.8 

         ‐ 

‐0.8031±j30.869             2.131 

     8.679 

 

 

 

Table 23: CNR WITH Multiple aspect (wire) 

  Multiple  aspect  extraction  leads  to  better  extraction  of  CNR  when  compared  with  single  response  extraction. When  15°  aspect  was  under  extraction,  some  poles  are  not  excited  and  missed.  But  when  utilising two aspect, the chances of getting poles related to target increases. Multiple extraction helps in  better pole extraction and target identification. 

4.5 Multiple extraction for breast volume:  The response data from the breast volume has 18 aspects with 8 different polarization. The possibilities  of  poles  extraction  can  be  done  in  two  ways,  Multiple  aspect  (18  look  direction  with  8  polarizations  47   

each) and polarimetric data (4 linear and 4 circular polarization for all the 18 aspects). Poles extraction  with multiple aspect and polarimetric datas are tabulated below,     

 

 

 

Time domain response     

  Single Extraction   

Extraction with  multiple signals 

   

  Multiple Aspect 

    Polarimetric 

       

 

     

Time_1_1(tvv)  Time_1_1(thh)  Time_1_1(thv)  Time_1_1(tvh)  Time_1_1(tvv)  Time_1_1(tll)  Time_1_1(trr)  Time_1_1(tlr)  Time_1_1(rl)‐ time_1_18() 

Tvv(time_1_1‐..)  Thh(time_1_1‐..)  Tvh(time_1_1‐..)  Thv(time_1_1‐..)  Tll(time_1_1‐..)  Trr(time_1_1‐..)  Tlr(time_1_1‐..)   

Time_1_1(tvv,tvh,thh,t hv)  Time_1_1(tll,trr,tlr,trl)  ......  time_1_18(tvv,tvh,thh ,thv)  time_1_18(tll,trr,tlr,trl )   

      Multiple set  of CNR  

   

 

 

Single set of       CNR 

Single set of        CNR 

  Fig5: Various ways of CNR extraction [11] 

4.6 Multiple Aspect Extraction for breast tumor detection:  Poles are extracted using Multiple aspect for data time_1_1 of No tumor case are tabulated below,  

48   

Time_1, TLR  Poles  ‐2.764±54.105  ‐3.825±24.533  ‐4.414±45.427  ‐5.104±33.746 

ER  0.04  97.99  0.0001  1.88 

ER  0.0001  94.36  2.045  3.574 

ER  0.05  0.034  22.23  77.85 

ER  1.36  0.29  0.001  98.36 

ER  0.0001  1.39  0.0001  98.57 

ER  0.0001  0.03  0.0001  99.98 

ER  0.0001  0.0000  0.15  99.86 

ER  0.0001  99.48  0.49  0.0001 

ER  0.0001  99.87  0.089  0.0001 

  ER  0.0001  98.54  1.18  0.0001     

ER  1.003  97.85  0.88  0.0001   

ER  ER  ER  ER  ER  1.89  0.39  0.0001  0.02  0.059  0.0001  0.3  1.99  1.0  98.78  2.99  89.35  0.08  0.3  0.03  94.968  8.99  97.53  98.51  1.00  Table 24: CNR of 18 aspect with Polarization LR 

ER  0.12  97.82  0.03  1.89 

ER  0.32  94.06  5.33  0.03 

Time_1,TRL  Poles  ‐2.75±54.096  ‐3.872±24.52  ‐4.4023±45.43  ‐5.128±33.76 

ER  0.03  95.62  0.0001  3.99 

ER  0.39  94.00  0.0001  6.25 

ER  0.7  97.53  0.002  1.24 

ER  0.79  96.52  0.02  2.33 

ER  0.08  2.1  0.07  97.39 

ER  0.0001  0.32  98.39  1.09 

ER  0.39  0.01  7.89  91.56 

ER  1.29  0.0001  0.53  97.93 

ER  0.09  97.86  2.00  0.0001 

  ER  0.0001  98.22  1.69  0.0001     

ER  0.00012  97.66  2.35  0.0001   

ER  ER  ER  ER  ER  0.0001  0.0001  0.0001  0.0001  1.78  0.0001  0.0001  0.003  0.03  0.04  0.5  5.37  0.0001  0.0001  0.16  99.38  94.55  99.89  99.75  97.896  Table 25: CNR of 18 aspect with Polarization RL 

ER  3.25  1.83  4.98  89.73 

ER  93.31  3.16  2.47  0.04 

Time_1,TLL  Poles  ‐3.827 ±30.285  ‐3.865 ±53.399  ‐4.4727±43.082 

ER  1.36  0.83  97.62 

ER  0.88  0.65  98.01 

ER  0.04  0.0001  99.69 

ER  97.47  2.46  0.06 

ER  1.52  0.002  98.45 

ER  99.66  0.0001  0.34 

ER  99.90  0.0002  0.01 

ER  99.18  0.0002  0.75 

ER  78.79  0.01  20.65 

  ER  83.39  0.45  16.10   

 

ER  82.45  0.39  16.98   

ER  ER  ER  ER  ER  97.55  99.62  98.64  98.26  97.34  0.001  0.0001  0.0002  0.01  1.125  2.34  0.3  1.26  1.73  0.24  Table 26: CNR of 18 aspect with Polarization LL 

ER  97.69  0.0001  2.22 

ER  2.36  0.33  96.9 

49   

Time_1,TRR  Poles  ‐3.828 ±30.275  ‐3.864 ±53.399  ‐4.4728±43.081 

ER  2.36  0.73  98.62 

ER  3.44  0.86  95.75 

ER  0.04  0.0001  99.82 

ER  98.47  1.46  0.08 

ER  2.59  0.002  97.27 

ER  99.70  0.0001  0.28 

ER  99.91  0.0002  0.01 

ER  99.09  0.0002  0.65 

ER  77.79  0.01  21.65 

  ER  82.41  0.25  17.10   

 

ER  0.04  19.49  79.77   

ER  ER  ER  ER  ER  99.35  99.52  96.64  97.26  98.34  0.001  0.0001  0.0002  0.03  1.74  0.45  0.39  3.26  2.73  0.19  Table 27: CNR of 18 aspect with Polarization RR 

ER  97.71  0.0001  2.39 

ER  2.22  0.19  97.12 

Time_1_x (x = 1 to 18),TVV  Poles  ‐3.338±43.8823  ‐4.501±33.2407  ‐2.855±53.4440  ‐6.521±23.1334    ER  14.69  84.99  0.23  0.0001     

ER  4.79  91.41  2.81  0.98 

ER  15.71  84.02  0.26  0.0001   

ER  5.14  91.57  1.51  1.7 

ER  0.20  6.21  0.029  93.56

ER  0.0001  1.76  0.0005  98.23

ER  0.0013  1.178  0.003  98.89

ER  0.035  99.89  0.08  0.0001

ER  0.502  99.35  0.0001  0.0001 

ER  ER  ER  ER  ER  10.02  0.44  2.12  0.002  0.0002  87.77  99.46  97.75  3.79  1.89  1.20  0.0001  0.05  0.66  0.64  0.0001  0.0001 0.0001 95.55 97.26 Table 28: CNR of 18 aspect with Polarization VV 

ER  7.36  92.62  0.0004  0.0001 

ER  0.189  9.98  1.552  88.24 

ER  9.32  90.42  0.010  0.0001

ER  5.77  88.32  3.36  1.53

Time_1,THH  Poles  ‐3.683±29.992  ‐3.692±42.001  ‐3.718±52.953  ‐5.444±25.195 

ER  1.23  33.62  0.79  64.17 

ER  11.56  9.822  0.143  78.46 

ER  95.05  0.958  1.235  2.56 

ER  97.75  0.06  2.12  0.03 

ER  99.34  0.0125  0.413  0.0001 

ER  98.90  1.01  0.0001  0.0001 

ER  97.48  2.368  0.008  0.0001 

ER  98.86  1.09  0.07  0.0001 

ER  99.339  0.12  0.002  0.0001 

  ER  96.88  3.04  0.0059  0.0001     

ER  96.34  2.97  0.659  0.0001   

ER  ER  ER  ER  ER  98.86  98.48  96.90  98.358  97.254  1.02  1.375  1.582  1.118  0.2242  0.003  0.0660  0.0001  0.412  1.390  0.0001  0.0001  0.0001  0.0001  0.1300  Table 29: CNR of 18 aspect with Polarization HH 

ER  94.016  0.267  0.004  5.71 

ER  15.565  5.812  0.143  78.478  50 

 

  Time_1,TVH  Poles  ‐2.655±33.219  ‐4.084±44.308  ‐4.705±52.647  ‐6.245±22.442 

ER  99.43  0.321  0.006  0.0016 

ER  98.96  0.005  0.02  0.65 

ER  98.91  2.20  0.04  0.0003 

ER  99.75  0.6  0.004  0.160 

ER  2.05  3.012  0.001  94.56 

ER  91.98  0.014  0.0002  7.322 

ER  98.04  1.42  0.009  0.045 

ER  55.98  0.18  0.0002  43.98 

ER  38.112  0.0332  0.0001  62.56 

  ER  96.96  0.0506  0.0002  3.02     

ER  40.23  0.99  0.0003  58.23   

ER  ER  ER  ER  ER  42.66  89.56  5.96  4.01  95.883  56.46  10.02  93.55  0.004  3.74  0.0002  0.045  0.0003  0.0001  0.205  0.0001  0.046  0.0001  95.65  0.163  Table 30: CNR of 18 aspect with Polarization VH 

ER  99.90  0.0804  0.0002  0.0001 

ER  99.96  0.035  0.0002  0.0001 

Time_1,THV  Poles  ‐3.338±43.8823  ‐4.501±33.2407  ‐2.855±53.4440  ‐6.521±23.1334 

ER  4.79  91.41  2.81  0.98 

ER  5.14  91.57  1.51  1.7 

ER  0.20  6.21  0.029  93.56 

ER  0.0001  1.76  0.0005  98.23 

ER  0.0013  1.178  0.003  98.89 

ER  0.035  99.89  0.08  0.0001 

ER  0.502  99.35  0.0001  0.0001 

ER  7.36  92.62  0.0004  0.001 

ER  9.32  90.42  0.010  0.0001 

  ER  14.69  84.99  0.23  0.0001     

ER  15.71  84.02  0.26  0.0001   

ER  ER  ER  ER  ER  10.02  0.44  2.12  0.002  0.0002  87.77  99.46  97.75  3.79  1.89  1.20  0.0001  0.05  0.66  0.64  0.001  0.0001  0.0001  95.55  97.26  Table 31: CNR of 18 aspect with Polarization HV 

ER  0.189  9.98  1.552  88.24 

ER  5.77  88.32  3.36  1.53 

 

4.7 Polarimetric data  The  poles  are  extracted  for  all  aspect  with  particular  polarization,  when  extracting  the  poles  with  particular polarization there is possibility of missing dominant poles so it is necessary to extract for all  polarization in linear or circular.   Poles  extracted  with  polarimetric  data  for  (time_1_1  to  time_1_18  for  4  linear  and  4  circular  polarizations) are tabulated below, 

51   

4.7.a Linear polarization for 18 aspects.(VV,HH,VH,HV)  Time_1_1  Poles  ‐2.433±54.888  ‐4.108 ±42.51  ‐4.6003±33.53  ‐3.8475±27.96   

ER  1.64  5.16  90.43  1.02   

ER  0.75  33.92  1.22  63.17 

ER  1.06  0.231  98.76  0.001   

ER  1.98  5.01  89.99  1.67   

ER  1.7  90.5  5.63  1.80   

ER  79.07  12.56  8.96  0.14 

ER  0.01  98.96  1.03  0.0001 

ER  1.7  90.5  5.14  2.51 

ER  0.02  92.26  6.21  1.34 

ER  2.23  2.56  93.05  0.958 

ER  0.05  0.0001  97.85  1.95 

ER  1.02  91.56  6.21  1.20 

Poles  ‐4.312 ±42.38  ‐5.121±32.78  ‐2.323±53.25  ‐3.876 ±28.18 

ER  0.0001  3.76  0.0005  96.23 

ER  0.06  95.45  2.12  1.03 

ER  0.02  98.25  0.924  0.001 

Time_1_5 Poles  ‐4.231±43.66  ‐4.323±33.255  ‐2.416±54.267  ‐3.632±28.443 

ER  0.0013  1.178  1.003  97.89 

ER  0.0125  95.34  1.417  1.0001 

Time_1_2 Poles  ‐3.889±28.021  ‐4.797 ±33.488  ‐4.242±42.618  ‐2.559 ±54.077 

Time_1_3  Poles  ‐2.278±54.19  ‐3.871 ±28.158  ‐4.538±33.707  ‐4.985±42.035 

Time_1_4

ER  0.244  1.30  0.07  97.56 

ER  0.0001  3.76  0.0005  95.23 

ER  0.0013  1.178  2.003  96.89 

52   

Time_1_6 Poles  ‐3.156 ±42.089  ‐4.223±35.319  ‐2.445±54.86  ‐3.722±28.332 

Time_1_7 Poles  ‐3.831±43.431  ‐3.510 ±33.898  ‐3.306±54.61  ‐3.767±28.686      Time_1_8 Poles  ‐3.742 ±44.19  ‐3.221±33.59  ‐2.964±54.23  ‐3.751±28.90 

Time_1_9 Poles  ‐4.120 ±44.498  ‐4.902±33.050  ‐3.545±54.732  ‐4.130±29.108 

Time_1_10 Poles  ‐4.1307±45.52  ‐5.3651±32.55  ‐4.117±55.256  ‐4.485±29.188    Time_1_1 1 Poles  ‐4.102±44.48  ‐5.105±33.08  ‐3.553±54.735  ‐4.131±29.108   

ER  0.035  98.89  1.08  0.001 

ER  2.56  0.0001  1.0001  95.90 

ER  0.01  92.62  0.0038  6.88 

ER  0.035  97.89  1.08  0.001 

ER  1.502  97.35  0.0001  0.0001   

ER  2.36  97.48  0.0008  0.0002 

ER  1.03  97.25  0.08  1.25 

ER  0.502  99.35  0.0001  0.0001 

ER  7.36  92.62  0.0004  0.0001 

ER  1.09  97.86  1.07  0.0001 

ER  1.56  64.36  0.05  33.88 

ER  9.32  90.42  0.010  0.001 

ER  0.12  99.33  0.0002  0.0001 

ER  2.36  83.64  0.075  13.96 

ER  9.32  90.42  0.010  0.0001 

ER  10.69  87.99  1.23  0.0001 

ER  3.04  95.88  1.005  0.0001 

ER  1.38  95.66  0.09  2.89 

ER  14.03  84.12  0.23  0.0001 

ER  15.71  83.02  0.26  0.0001 

ER  2.97  95.34  1.659  0.0001 

ER  1.56  42.56  0.06  56.05 

ER  15.71  84.02  0.26  0.0001 

ER  8.36  91.62  0.0004  0.0001 

53   

Time_1_12 Poles  ‐3.815±44.246  ‐5.441±33.66  ‐3.013±54.271  ‐3.749±28.902 

ER  10.02  87.77  1.20  0.0001 

ER  1.02  98.86  0.003  0.0001 

ER  33.59  65.26  0.12  0.0114 

ER  10.02  86.77  2.20  0.0001 

Time_1_13 Poles  ‐3.817±43.42  ‐3.51±33.590  ‐3.29±54.192  ‐3.758±28.688 

ER  2.44  97.46  0.0001  0.0001 

ER  1.37  98.04  0.06  0.0001 

ER  0.3  92.36  0.07  6.89 

ER  2.44  97.46  0.0001  0.0001 

ER  2.12  97.43  0.05  0.0001 

ER  1.58  96.90  0.0001  0.0001 

ER  87.76  12.212  0.0238  0.0001

ER  2.12  97.75  0.05  0.0001

ER  0.002  3.79  0.66  95.02 

ER  1.118  98.35  0.412  0.0001 

ER  0.023  4.59  0.177  94.62 

ER  0.002  3.79  0.66  95.03 

ER  0.0002  2.89  1.64  95.26 

ER  0.22  97.25  1.39  0.13 

ER  0.02  99.63  0.0004  0.001 

ER  0.0002  1.89  0.64  96.26 

ER  0.189  9.98  1.552  88.24 

ER  0.26  94.06  0.004  5.71 

Time_1_14 Poles  ‐3.155±42.101  ‐4.238±36.142  ‐2.368±54.87  ‐3.706±28.33  Time_1_15 Poles  ‐4.126±43.595  ‐5.238±35.236  ‐2.1961±54.194  ‐3.635±28.45 

Time_1_16 Poles  ‐4.982±42.395  ‐5.123±32.838  ‐2.305±53.291  ‐3.871 ±28.176    Time_1_17 Poles  ‐5.096±41.994  ‐4.478±33.881  ‐2.101±54.138  ‐3.869±28.155   

ER  2.23  96.98  0.0032  0.014 

ER  1.189  9.98  1.552  87.24 

54   

Time_1_18 Poles  ‐4.368±42.32  ‐4.568±33.66  ‐2.552±54.149  ‐3.8908±28.008       

ER  ER  ER  ER  5.77  5.81  0.03  5.77  88.01  15.565  98.89  87.32  3.08  0.143  0.0898  4.36  2.53  78.47  0.0534  1.53  Table 32: CNR extraction with Linear polarizations 

4.7.b Circular  polarization (LL, RR, LR, RL)  Time_1_1  Poles  ‐3.7424±26.084  ‐2.621±53.958  ‐3.720±42.56  ‐4.146±35.463    Time_1_2 Poles  ‐3.749±28.244  ‐2.037±53.964  ‐4.160±42.234  ‐4.146±35.463      Time_1_3 Poles  ‐3.733±28.144  ‐2.793±54.573  ‐4.620±42.828  ‐4.146±35.463    Time_1_4 Poles  ‐3.778±28.204  ‐2.797±53.108  ‐4.586±41.931  ‐4.146±35.463    Time_1_5 Poles  ‐3.723±28.403  ‐2.894±54.55  ‐4.028±43.751  ‐4.146±35.463   

ER  1.36  1.83  96.62  0.0001 

ER  0.36  1.05  98.62  0.0001 

ER  97.99  0.04  0.0001  1.88 

ER  95.62  0.03  0.0001  3.99 

ER  0.88  0.65  98.01  0.0001 

ER  3.44  0.86  95.05  0.0001 

ER  94.36  0.0001  2.045  1.574 

ER  92.00  0.39  0.0001  6.25 

ER  0.04  0.0001  99.43  0.0001 

ER  0.04  0.0001  98.82  0.0001 

ER  0.034  0.05  22.23  77.85 

ER  96.53  1.7  0.002  1.24 

ER  96.47  2.46  0.32  0.0001 

ER  98.02  1.24  0.08  0.0001 

ER  0.29  1.36  0.001  97.36 

ER  96.52  0.12  0.02  2.33 

ER  1.52  0.002  97.45  0.0001 

ER  2.59  0.002  96.27  0.0001 

ER  1.39  0.0001  0.0001  98.57 

ER  2.1  0.08  0.07  96.39  55 

 

Time_1_6 Poles  ‐3.673±28.372  ‐2.384±54.574  ‐3.697±41.644  ‐4.146±35.463    Time_1_7 Poles  ‐3.767±28.636  ‐4.147±53.36  ‐4.947±43.648  ‐6.103±32.710 

Time_1_8 Poles  ‐4.108±28.768  ‐4.588±53.596  ‐3.7138±40.948  ‐5.293±32.266      Time_1_9 Poles  ‐4.652±28.637  ‐3.248±54.437  ‐3.899±42.1729  ‐4.765±32.511 

Time_1_10 Poles  ‐4.703±28.617  ‐4.405±54.268  ‐5.098±45.846  ‐4.829±32.582    Time_1_11 Poles  ‐4.649±28.626  ‐3.244±54.40  ‐3.932±42.185  ‐4.744±32.498   

ER  99.66  0.0001  0.34  0.0001 

ER  99.70  0.0001  0.28  0.0001 

ER  0.03  0.0001  0.0001  99.98 

ER  0.32  0.0001  98.39  1.09 

ER  99.90  0.0002  0.01  0.0001 

ER  99.91  0.0002  0.01  0.0001 

ER  0.0001  0.0001  0.15  99.86 

ER  0.01  0.39  7.89  91.56 

ER  99.18  0.0002  0.75  0.0001 

ER  99.09  0.0002  0.65  0.0001 

ER  99.48  0.0001  0.49  0.0001 

ER  0.0001  1.29  0.53  97.93 

ER  78.79  0.01  20.65  0.0001 

ER  77.79  0.01  21.65  0.0001 

ER  99.87  0.0001  0.089  0.0001 

ER  97.86  0.09  2.00  0.0001 

ER  83.39  0.45  16.10  0.0001 

ER  82.41  0.25  17.10  0.0001 

ER  98.54  0.0001  1.18  0.0001 

ER  98.22  0.0001  1.69  0.0001 

ER  82.45  0.39  16.98  0.0001 

ER  0.04  19.49  79.77  0.0001 

ER  97.85  1.003  0.88  0.0001 

ER  97.66  0.0001  2.35  0.0001  56 

 

Time_1_12 Poles  ‐4.065±28.88  ‐4.570±53.66  ‐3.813±42.93  ‐5.329±32.25 

ER  97.55  0.001  2.34  0.0001 

ER  99.35  0.001  0.45  0.0001 

ER  0.0001  1.89  2.99  94.968 

ER  0.0001  0.0001  0.5  99.38 

ER  99.62  0.0001  0.3  0.0001 

ER  99.52  0.0001  0.39  0.0001 

ER  98.64  0.0002  1.26  0.0001 

ER  96.64  0.0002  3.26  0.0001 

ER  1.99  0.0001  0.08  97.53 

ER  0.003  0.0001  0.0001  99.89 

ER  98.26  0.01  1.73  0.0001 

ER  97.26  0.03  2.73  0.0001 

ER  1.0  0.02  0.3  98.51 

ER  0.03  0.0001  0.0001  99.75 

ER  97.34  1.125  0.24  0.0001 

ER  98.34  1.74  0.19  0.001 

ER  98.78  0.059  0.03  1.00 

ER  0.04  1.78  0.16  97.896 

ER  97.69  0.0001  2.22  0.0001 

ER  97.71  0.0001  2.39  0.0001 

ER  97.82  0.12  0.03  1.89 

ER  1.83  3.25  4.98  89.73 

Time_1_13 Poles  ‐3.764±28.641  ‐4.0093±53.555  ‐5.162±43.604  ‐4.523±32.814    Time_1_14 Poles  ‐3.644±28.358  ‐2.388±54.57  ‐3.697±41.641  ‐4.130±33.435    Time_1_15 Poles  ‐3.731±28.416  ‐2.507±54.31  ‐4.037±43.731  ‐4.523±35.629 

Time_1_16 Poles  ‐3.778±28.194  ‐2.798±53.10  ‐4.306±42.324  ‐4.879±33.099    Time_1_17 Poles  ‐3.892±28.05  ‐2.738±54.57  ‐4.310±33.76  ‐4.752±44.256 

ER  0.3  0.39  89.35  8.99 

ER  0.0001  0.0001  5.37  94.55 

57   

Time_1_18 Poles  ‐4.091±28.070  ‐3.679±55.543  ‐4.127±42.525  ‐4.030±33.925       

ER  ER  ER  ER  2.36  2.22  94.06  3.16  0.33  0.19  0.32  93.31  96.9  97.12  5.33  2.47  0.0001  0.000  0.03  0.04  Table 33:  CNR extraction with circular polarizations 

When  the  extraction  is  done  with  multiple  aspect,  the  response  signal  corresponds  to  the  target  are  from many look directions (here 18 look directions) and with particular polarization state. Some poles  are excited at the particular polarization and some poles are excited with other. So in order to get the  most dominant poles of a certain taget, the poles must be extracted for all the polarizations (Linear or  circular). For instance, the poles extracted for multiple aspect (time_1_1 to time_1_18) with polarization  LL, the pole 23 is missing but when it is with the polarization LR it appears and it is possible to extract  the most dominant poles when we perform extraction with all polarization cases. When the polarimetric  data is utilized for a specific look direction, the poles which are excited with all the polarization aspect  can  be  extracted.  So,  usage  of  polarimetric  data  helps  in  dominant  pole  extraction  better  and  time  consuming.  

  4.8 Poles extraction for NO tumor, 10mm and 15mm tumor:  The  response  data  from  No  tumor,  10mm  and  15mm  tumor  are  processed  through  Matrix  Pencil  Method. The poles are extracted for all the three cases, the poles which are extracted from no tumor  data corresponds only to the breast volume, while the poles from 10mm and 15mm tumor related to  both breast volume and breast tumor. The polarimetric data for all the three cases are utilsed in poles  extraction are tabulated below,  Poles (No tumor, M = 16) 

Poles (10mm tumor, M = 23) 

Poles (15mm tumor, M = 36) 

‐3.742±j26.084  ‐2.621±j53.958  ‐3.720±j42.561  ‐4.146±j35.463 

‐3.357±j28,114  ‐2.896±j53.824  ‐3.353±j41.774  ‐4.473±j32.229  ‐3.473±j40.782  ‐2.094±j45.452   

‐2.6905±j27.18  ‐2.645±j54.387  ‐4.114±j42.885  ‐4.921±j33.954  ‐1.981±j40.958  ‐2.108±j30.193  ‐1.924±j51.037  ‐2.186±j37.381 

  Poles obtained in the first column corresponds to no tumor target and poles corresponds only to breast  volume.  In  the  case  of  10mm  and  15mm,  poles  are  related  to  both  breast  volume  and  tumor.  It  is  58   

noticeable that there are common poles in all three cases which are related to breast volume and new  poles represent the tumor.  

59   

5.Discussion:    The  transient  response  signal  from  the  target  are  processed  through  the  MPM  algorithm,  the  extracted  CNR  corresponds  to  the  target.  In  order  to  simplify  the  process  of  CNR  extraction,  multiple  signal from the target are processed at once through MPM algorithm which can handles more than one  signal.  Multiple  signal  may  be  of  Multiple  aspect  or  polarimetric,  when  analysing  the  parameter  extraction with response signal from multiple look directions at particular polarization, there are some  missing  dominant  poles  since  all  the  modes  are  not  excited  at  particular  polarization.  So  all  the  polarization aspects are considered for all the look directions and again it is a time consuming process.  But the extracted CNR with the polarimetric data comprises of all dominant poles related to the target  since all modes are excited. From the analysis, it is very clear that the polarimetric data possess the good  chances of CNR etraction of breast tumor.     When the  response signal from the  No tumor,  10mm  tumor and 15mm tumor  are processed through  the  MPM  algorithm,  CNR  extracted  for  all  the  3  cases.  The  extracted  parameter  for  No  tumor  corresponds only to the breast volume, whereas the CNR from the 10mm and 15mm tumor corresponds  to the breast tumor and breast volume. Better discriminations are seen for 3 different cases of breast  tumor.  

60   

6. Conclusion  Based  on  Singularity  Expansion  Method,  resonance  based  target  recognition  using  Complex  Natural  Resonance  was  implemented.  Matrix  pencil  Method  is  the  microwave  technique  for  extraction  of  parameter  CNR  has  been  selected.  Algorithm  of  Matrix  Pencil  Method  which  processes  the  transient  response  signal  was  developed  and  CNR  extracted.  To  make  the  CNR  extraction  easy  and  reduce  the  extraction  time,  MPM  algorithm  which  handles  multiple  signal  was  developed.  Two  different  cases  of  multiple  signals,  multiple aspect  and  polarimetric  data  were  utilized.  CNR  extraction  was  obtained  for  both the cases and the best method was analysed. Form the numerical analysis, it was shown that the  polarimetric datas helps in better target recognition.   The  test  case  of  1m  wire  was  considered  and  poles  are  extracted  using  single  response  and  multiple  aspect.  the  breast  cancer  detection  was  made  by  parameter  extraction  of  3  different  cases  of  breast  tumor. No tumor, 10mm and 15mm tumor are considerd for parameter extraction. The extracted CNR  are tabulated for all the 3 cases and dominant CNR corresponds to the breast cancer and breast volume  are  shown.  As  we  could  able  to  see  the  CNR  corresponds  to  the  breast  tumor,  it  gives  us  a  good  confidence  about  the  chances  of  using  Ultra  Wideband  microwave  technologies  in  breast  tumor  detection.   From  the  project,  the  clear  idea  of  using  microwave  technologies  for  breast  cancer  detection  and  uniqueness  of  microwave  technology  were  shown.  As  Ultra  Wideband  microwave  technologies  has  consist of good positive points of non ionizing radiations, good sensitivity and find out the changes in the  dielectric  properties  of  tissues  it  creates  the  revolution  in  breast  tumor  detection.  The  numerical  parameter  CNR  of  the  breast  tumor  are  clearly  idenified  so  it  makes  the  bright  chances  of  using  this  technique in breast cancer detection. 

61   

References:  [1] Screeing of breast cancer by Mammography, The Nordic Cochrane Centre.  [2]  Using  the  Matrix  Pencil  Method  to  Estimate  the  Parameter  of  a  Sum  of  Complex  Exponentials.  By  Tapan K.Sarkar and Odilon Pereira.   [3]  Extraction  of  the  Natural  Frequencies  of  a  Radar  Target  from  a  Measured  Response  Using  E‐Pulse  Techniques by Edward J.Rothwell, Kun‐Mu Chen and Dennis P.Nyquist.  [4] Radar Target Discrimination Using the E‐pulse technique by E.J.Rothwell, D.P Nyquist, K.M Chen and  B.Drachman.  [5]  Application  of  the  Matrix  Pencil  method  for  Estimating  the  Singularity  Expansion  Method  Poles  of  source  free  transient  responses  from  Multiple  look  directions  by  Tapan  Kumar  sarkar,  Sheeyum  park,  Jinhwan Koh, Sadasiva M. Roa.  [6]  On  the  analysis  of  Electromagnetic  Transients  from  radar  Target  using  SPWVD  by  Hoi‐Shun  Lui,  Nicholas V. Shuley.  [7] Breast tumor charecterization based on Ultrawideband Backscatter by Shakthi K Davis, D Van Veen  and Susan C Hagness.  [8] Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Robert R. Edelman and Steven Warach, The New England Journal of  Medicine.  [9] Singularity Expansion method and its application to target identification by Baun C. E.   [10]  Analysis  of  forward  scattering  data  for  mirowave  breast  imaging  by  Hoi‐Shun  Lui  and  Andears  Fhager and Michel perrson.   [11] Radar based resonance target identification with multiple polarization by Hoi‐Shun Lui and Nicolas  Shuley, School of information technology and Electrical Engineering, University of queensland, Australia.   [12] Complex Resonance frequencies of Biological Targets for microwave imaging application by Dewald  and R Bansul.  [13] M. El‐Shenawee,"Resonant spectra of malignant breast cancer tumors using the three‐dimensional  electromagnetic fast multipole model", IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., vol. 51, p.35 , 2004.    [14] Hoi‐Shun Lui, et al. “Preliminary Investigation of Breast Tumor Detection Using the E‐Pulse  Technique”, Proceedings of IEEE AP‐S International Symposium USNC/URSI National Radio Science  Meeting, pp.283‐286, 9 – 14 July, 2006, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA  

62