Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Germany (1937 Borders)

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Germany (1937 Borders) By Henry L. deZeng IV Edition: June 2014-Cottbus...

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Germany (1937 Borders) By Henry L. deZeng IV

Cottbus Edition: June 2014

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Copyright © by Henry L. deZeng IV (Work in Progress). (1st Draft 2014) Blanket permission is granted by the author to researchers to extract information from this publication for their personal use in accordance with the generally accepted definition of fair use laws. Otherwise, the following applies: All rights reserved. No part of this publication, an original work by the authors, may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the author. Any person who does any unauthorized act in relation to this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and civil claims for damages. This information is provided on an "as is" basis without condition apart from making an acknowledgement of authorship.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Airfields

Germany (1937 borders) Introduction Preface Germany lost use of her aviation assets after World War I as prescribed by the 1919 Treaty of Versailles, Article 198. The majority of the existing airfields were closed by the Inter-Allied Armistice Commission and sat vacant until 1924 when aviation activity slowly resumed. The initial planning for a new network of secret military airfields began between 1924 and 1927 using the development of civil airports, unimproved landing grounds used by civil sport flying clubs and numerous civil emergency landing sites as cover. Gradually over the following years, as the Versailles restrictions became less enforced and Germany strengthened, these approximately 100 airports and roughly 150 unattended landing grounds and sites were improved into what would become military airfields by the mid-1930’s. The next major event affecting the country’s aviation ground organization was in 1935 when it was decided to develop a number of camouflaged, unoccupied airfields for the use of operational units should the Third Reich decide to annex by force or invade neighboring states. These were called Einsatzhafen (operational airfield) and were classified as E-Hafen I with better and more infrastructure and E-Hafen II with less infrastructure. From this date forward, the airfield organization in Germany developed rapidly. The Luftwaffe’s mobilization plan of 1 July 1939 called for the following to be operational by 1 September 1939:1 64 Leithorste (large, well-established controlling airdromes) 119 Fliegerhorstkommandanturen A 10 Fliegerhorstkommandanturen B 1

NARA WashDC RG 242, T-321 roll 104/530-38. -1-

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 4 Fliegerhorstkommandanturen C 81 E-Hafen I 38 E-Hafen II 19 Other Airfields (e.g., Feldflugplatz or field airstrip) 6 See-Flugstützpunkte (seaplane stations) Total: 341 airfields of various types not including emergency landing grounds. This number had more than doubled by 1945. There were no or very few concrete runways in Germany at the beginning of the war on 1 September 1939, but from then to June 1940 an urgent program commenced to lay down concrete runways and servicing hardstands at certain airfields in NW Germany intended for use by bombers. The program was then halted and little was done to improve the airfields in the country for the next two years, except for airfield construction activity in Pomerania and West and East Prussia in conjunction with the planned attack on the Soviet Union. It was then resumed with considerable urgency around mid-1943 as Allied air power began building over the German homeland. Dispersal areas were constructed for aircraft, remote dispersals set up, runway improvements made and, from mid-1944 to the end of the war, the lengthening and paving of numerous runways to make them serviceable for jet aircraft.

Conventions Germany’s borders in 1937 were chosen because this was the last year before the Third Reich began annexing large amounts of territory from its neighbors, i.e., Austria and Czechoslovakia. Those airfields that meet this definition can be found below. See the General Introduction for further information.

Airfields Listed A total of 1,127 airfields of all types are listed plus numerous satellite fields, dummy airfields, city garrisons and cross-reference entries. It must be noted that for various reasons many of these airfields belonged to the Luftwaffe but were not actively used during the war or used only occasionally.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

A Aachen-Merzbrück (GER) (50 49 20 N – 06 11 15 E) General: airfield 9 km NE of Aachen in North Rhine – Westphalia and 1.6 km E of Weiden. History: 1932 listed as a secondary civil airport (Flughafen II). Taken over by the Luftwaffe in the late 1930’s, and in 1940 used as an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) for the campaign in the West, then little used until Oct 43. Taken over by the USSAF on 14 March 1945. Surface and Dimensions: grass with no paved runway. Measured approx. 640 x 685 meters (700 x 750 yards) and roughly square in shape. Operational Units: 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 23 (Apr-May 40); IV.(Stuka)/LG 1 (May 40); Stab, I., II./St.G. 77 (May 40). Station Commands: none identified. Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): schw.Flak-Abt. 212(v) (Apr 41 – 1942); Stab/schw.Flak-Abt. 514(o) (as Flakgruppe Aachen) (1943 – Sep 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 525 (Eisb.) (Apr-Jun 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 535 (Eisb.) (May-Jul 44); le.Flak-Abt. 889 (mid-43 – Sep 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.584-638 (10 Sep 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Achern (GER) (c. 38 48 04 N – 08 03 51 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 18 km SSW of Baden-Baden in SW Germany. History: 1940 listed as a Gefechtslandeplatz. 1941 listing upgraded to operational airfield (Einsatzhafen). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Achmer (GER) (a.k.a. Achmer-Bramsche) (52 22 30 N – 07 55 15 E) General: Fliegerhorst (air station or air base) 15 km NW of Osnabrück in Lower Saxony in NW Germany, 5.2 km SW of Bramsche, 2.8 km S of Achmer village and just a few kilometers from the airfields at Hesepe and Vörden. History: construction began in 1936 and was completed in 1939, with additions and improvements continuing to 1944. First use by a flying unit dates from August 1940 (10.(Erg.)/KG 2 with Do 17s). Achmer was essentially a bomber base until 1943 and then a fighter base after that. Dimensions: approx. 2380 x 1370 meters (2600 x 1500 yards). Surface and Runways: three camouflaged concrete runways in the form of a triangle measuring 1,800 meters plus a 550 meter prepared -3-

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 strip at one end, 1,700 meters and 1,550 meters. Along the center of the S boundary were 14 ladder-type paved servicing hardstands with refueling points. Equipped with runway, perimeter and obstruction lighting as well as a visual Lorenz system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: munitions dumps to the S and N sides of the field. Infrastructure: compass swing and machine gun registration range were available, 1 medium and 1 small workshop hangar and buildings along the NE boundary, station HQ, admin buildings and some barracks along the S boundary, flying control (Flugleitung) at the center of the S boundary, motor pool and garages at the NE corner, a barracks camp on the outskirts of Achmer village, and in 1941 a camp for Russian POWs was built on the NW side of the airfield. Additional barrack blocks were under construction 8 km NW of the airfield and in a woods 4.8 km to the N of the field. A branch rail line served the building area, the fuel dump and the munitions dump. Dispersal: there were 52 open aircraft shelters and 6 additional parking sites along the perimeter and in a remote dispersal area S of the airfield in December 1944. Defenses: a heavy Flak position with 4 x 12.8-cm guns was set up on the Bramscher Berg in fall 1943 and there were at least 12 light Flak positions surrounding the airfield, including some in specially built Flak towers. Satellites and Decoys: Achmer-Wallenbrock (GER) (52 21 45 N – 07 49 50 E). Dummy 6.5 km WSW of Achmer airfield and 2.5 km NW of Wallenbrock. Had a large mock landing area, 1 mock hangar and several fake buildings at SW corner. Phony aircraft were parked at the NW and SW corners. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.602 (15 Aug 44)] Remarks: 18 Aug 42: bombed – 1 x Bü 131 from IV./KG 2 destroyed. 28 Nov 43: Fl.H.Kdtr. reported total enlisted strength as 438 NCOs and 742 men. 21 Feb 44: heavily bombed by B-17 Fortresses and B-24 Liberators – 1 x Ju 188 E-1 from 1./KG 2 destroyed on the ground and 1 x Fw 190A from II./JG 1 damaged. 8 Mar 44: low-level attack by U.S. fighters - 6 x Do 217s from III./KG 2 destroyed (4) or damaged (2). 23 Mar 44: bombed by 21 B-24s. 8 Apr 44: bombed by 60 B-17s - 9 x Do 217s from III./KG 2 destroyed (8) or damaged (1). 15 Apr 44: low-level attack – 1 x Do 217M from III./KG 2 destroyed.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 26 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x He 177 destroyed, plus 2 x Fw 190s and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 16 Feb 45: bombed – 1 x Me 262 and 1 x Fw 190 damaged, several barracks and airfield installations hit, and several munitions bunkers also hit. (German report) 24 Feb 45: strafed by 8 P-47s – 1 x Bf 109 destroyed. (German reports) 20/21 Mar 45: bombed by 180 B-24s and 12 B-17s and strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – 18 x Ar 234s from III./KG 76 destroyed (10) or damaged (8), 19 x Bf 109s and 1 x He 111 destroyed, 2 x Me 262s, 18 x Bf 109s and 1 x Fw 190 damaged (according to German sources). The VIII Fighter Command P-51s claimed 9 x Bf 109s, 19 x Fw 190s, 11 x Ar 234s, 3 x He 111s, 2 x Ju 88s, 3 x Do 217s and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 6 x Bf 109s, 6 x Fw 190s, 10 x Ar 234s, 1 x Me 410, 1 x Ju 88, 3 x Ju 188s, 2 x Do 217s and 5 x unidentified aircraft damaged. Additionally, the runways and landing area were hard hit and 2 hangars burned down. 24 Mar 45: bombed by 73 B-17s – no significant new damage. (German report) 11 Apr 45: RAF units began operating from Achmer. Airfield Units: Operational Units: II./KG 27 (Feb-Mar, Apr-May 40); Stab/KG 2 (Nov 41); 6./KG 2 (Apr-Jun 41); 7., 8./KG 2 (Jun 41 – Jan 42); 3. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 100 (Jun 43); Stab, 1.(F), 2.(F)/FAGr. 5 (Jun/Jul – Dec 43); Sturmstaffel 1 (Oct-Dec 43); III./KG 2 (01.44 – 06.44), Erprobungskdo. 25 (Sep 43 – Mar 44); III./KG 3 (Apr-May 44); Stab, II./KG 30 (Aug-Oct 44); III./JG 11 (Sep-Oct 44); Sonderstaffel Einhorn (Sep-Oct 44); Erprobungskdo. 262 (Sep 44); Kommando Nowotny (Sep-Nov 44); 12./JG 54 (Oct-Dec 44); IV./JG 27 (Nov 44 – Mar 45); Stab/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); II./KG 51 (Jan 45); Stab, III./KG 76 (Jan-Mar 45); Gefechtsverband Kowalewski (26 Feb – 5 Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./KG 2 (Aug 40 – Aug 42). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 19/XI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt.d.Lw.(o) 19/XI (spring 44 – Apr 45); le.Flak-Abt. 743 (1943-44); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 871 (1943-44); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 75/XI (1943-45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 110/IV (Feb 44)? [Sources: AFHRA A5257 pp.1004-05 (15 Oct 43) and A5257A pp.2830 (3 Dec 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site fliegerhorste.de] Adlershof (GER): see Berlin-Johannisthal. Adlholz (GER) (49 34 40 N – 11 51 30 E) -5-

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Bavaria 15 km N of Amberg in S Germany, 9.7 km SE of Vilseck airfield and 1 km E of Adlholz village. History: 1939 as a Gefechtslandeplatz. 1940 as a Feldflugplatz. Wartime use unknown. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1280 x 410 meters (1400 x 450 yards). Infrastructure: buildings in the tiny hamlet of Ölhof off the W boundary and linked to the landing area by taxi tracks were probably used as workshops. The nearest rail connection was at Vilseck on the line to Nürnberg. Dispersal: surrounding woods provided excellent cover for parking and concealing aircraft. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XII Fürth (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 32/VII Fürth (1944); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 30/VII Bayreuth-Bindlach (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.19 (5 Apr 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Aebeltoft (See) (GER): see Ebeltoft. Ahlhorn (GER) (52 53 20 N – 08 13 20 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Lower Saxony 44 km WSW of Bremen in NW Germany, 27.2 km S of Oldenburg and 1.6 km SW of Ahlhorn village. History: built in 1915-16 as a naval airship (Zeppelin) station with 6 huge hangars for the dirigibles. Eventually, 25 dirigibles were based there with a station complement of 2,500. The hangars were destroyed or damaged in a gas explosion in January 1918 and what remained was dismantled after WWI. The land was acquired by the Luftwaffe in 1938 and rebuilt as an airfield. Had very little use until 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1160 x 1510 meters (1,270 x 1,650 yards). Runways: 3 concrete runways in the form of a triangle, each illuminated, equipped with a beam approach system and measuring approx. 1160 meters (1,270 yards). Two long rows of ladder-type, paved servicing hardstands with refueling points extended along the N and SW boundaries with a third but shorter row at the SE corner. Infrastructure: full servicing and support facilities available including a compass swing, machine gun registration range. One large hangar with paved apron was off the SW corner. A long rectangular building off the NW corner may have been a workshop or a garage. Barracks and airfield buildings were in two main groups off the SW corner and off the center of the N boundary. There were two munitions dumps including one in a woods 2.4 km to the E of the landing area. Railway connection at the W boundary with a branch line running to the NE corner of the airfield. -6-

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: an estimated 25 open aircraft shelters along the edge of a woods off the NW boundary, and a second area with 16 parking spaces through a woods off the S corner in July 1944. Defenses: undetermined number of light Flak positions. Satellites and Decoys: Wildeshausen (GER) (52 55 15 N – 08 21 00 E). Dummy 19.5 km SW of Delmenhorst airfield, 9.7 km E of Ahlhorn airfield and 14 km ESE of Bissel airfield. Mock-up included a decoy landing area measuring approx. 825 x 460 meters (900 x 500 yards), 4 dummy hangars and decoy aircraft parked in the hangar area and off the W boundary. The field was probably illuminated. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.622 (1944)] Remarks: 21 Feb 44: bombed by B-17 Fortresses – servicing hardstands, barracks and buildings off the SW corner hard hit with heavy destruction and damage, and the NW/SE runway cratered and unserviceable. 5 Aug 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Do 217 destroyed and 2 x Me 163 Komet rocket-propelled fighters damaged. 16 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – 1 x He 177 A-3 from Erprobungskommando 25 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 21 Mar 45:heavily bombed by 61 B-24 Liberators and the next day by 99 B-17s with damage so great, especially to the runways, that further use of the airfield was impossible. Further, 2 x Ju 88s were slightly damaged and 25 were KIA. 2 Apr 45: strafed by RAF Tempests – claimed 2 x Ju 88s damaged. Early Apr 45: air attack – 6 x Ju 88 A-4s from II./LG 1 destroyed on the ground (these were probably unserviceable and abandoned when the Gruppe transferred from Ahlhorn to Brandis on 6 March). Operational Units: III./KG 6 (Jul-Sep 44); 8./KG 3 (Sep-Oct 44); 2./KG 53 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); Stab, II./LG 1 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); 1./NAGr. 6 (Mar-Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Ahlhorn/Süd (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 23/XI (spring 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 85/XI (1943 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Ahlhorn of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 17/XI Vechta (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt.(v) 104/XI (Sep 44 – 1945); elements of 101. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Oct 44); one half of 131. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) ( ? – Oct 44); 142. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) ( ? – Oct 44); Luftminen-Zug 14 (Feb-Mar 45); elements of schw.Flak-Abt. 572 (c.Jan-Mar 44); 5./le.Flak-Abt. 922 (1943-44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 64/VI (Oct 44 - ?); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 185/VI (Oct 44 - ?); Feld-Ausb.Rgt. d.Lw. 2 (1943); Feldersatz-Btl. d.Lw. 2 (1943-44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.31-35 (5 Jan 44 updated to 21 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Ahlimbsmühle (GER) (a.k.a. Gollin) (53 04 31 N – 13 37 17 E) General: airfield (Flugplatz) 66 km N of Berlin in Brandenburg in NE Germany, 9.5 km SE of Templin and adjacent to the hamlet of Ahlimbsmühle. History: list as operational in Feb 44 and in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Aibling (GER): see Bad Aibling. Ailertchen (GER) (50 35 30 N – 07 57 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 36 km NE of Koblenz in the Westerwald area of Rhineland-Pfalz in W Germany and .8 km SSE of Ailertchen village. History: built in the second half of the 1930s along with the other Einsatzhafen and operational by May 1940. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1,100 x 1,100 yards). Runway: undulating grass surface. Infrastructure: no hangars – had a group of workshops sited around a paved square off the E boundary and other workshop buildings along the same boundary and off the N corner. Munitions dump off the SW corner accessed by a perimeter road. No barracks – personnel billeted in the surrounding villages. Airfield served by a branch rail line that was connected to the Erbach-Limburg line. Dispersal: none – aircraft parted along the perimeter. Defenses: unknown. Operational Units: Stab/NAGr. 1 (Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Ailertchen (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 22/XII (Mar 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 212/XII (c.Oct 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werftkdo. (o) 104/XII (1 Jan 45); Werkstattwagenzug (Fl) 4/XIV (1 Jan 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.36-37 (14 Jun 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ainring (GER) (47 48 55 N – 12 57 30 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen - Deutsches Forschungsinstitut für Segelflugwesen – DFS) 7.5 km WNW of Salzburg in north-central Austria just across the border from Germany; airfield located .8 km E of Ainring village.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 History: constructed 1933-34 as a civil and sports airfield, but was largely used as an alternative airport for Hitler, Göring and their entourage flying between Berlin and Berchtesgaden. DFS took it over in June 1940 and it became the site for high-tech aviation development and experimentation to the end of the war. Dimensions: approx. 685 x 825 meters (750 x 900 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface on gravel sub-soil. No paved runway. Equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: believed to have had underground fuel storage in front of the large hangar on the S side. There was a large ammunition dump in a woods 1.2 km W of the landing area. Infrastructure: had a total of 7 hangars, including 5 and a workshop hangar along the S boundary and 1 medium hangar off the SE corner. A large servicing hardstand fronted a large hangar on the S boundary. The main barracks complex was off the S and SE boundaries along with some other buildings that may have been used for workshops and stores. Two groups of additional buildings, probably barracks, were under construction in 1943-44 about a kilometer to the NE and NNW of the airfield. The control tower and meteorological office were probably in the hangar area on the S boundary. Nearest rail connection at the SE corner of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal areas in spring 1944. Defenses: had 1 heavy Flak position and 1 light Flak position in 1943. The airfield was also protected by the Salzburg Flak defenses. Remarks: although photographed frequently by aircraft, Ainring was never attacked by heavy bombers as the airfield played no role in Luftwaffe combat operations. 16 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 3 x Fw 190s and 1 x Fw 189 destroyed. 4 May 45: captured without a fight by the U.S. 101st Cavalry Group (Mechanized). Operational Units: Erprobungskdo. L.S. (Aug 44); elements of Fliegergeschwader z.b.V. 7 (Dec 44); Lufttransportstaffel 40 (Mar-Apr 45); II., III./JG 300 (Apr-May 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 13 (Neubiberg); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 23, FFS A/B 23 then FFS A 23 (Kaufbeuren) (1939-45). Station Commands: Fliegerhorstkommandantur Ainring. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 163/XIII (1944). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.58-59 (24 Feb 43 updated to 1 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] -9-

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Aken (GER) (51 49 30 N – 12 01 40 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 15.5 km W of Dessau in Anhalt/C Germany and 3.25 km SSW of the town of Aken. History: information lacking, but believed to have been used for glider training. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 915 x 825 meters (1000 x 900 yards) with an “L” shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: no hangars, but 2 small buildings off the N boundary could be used as workshops when needed. Personnel were accommodated in nearby villages. Dispersal: a few crude parking bays were cut into the heavy woods on the N boundary. Operational Units: none identified. Station Units: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.494 (16 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Allenstadt (GER) (coordinates unknown) General: not located, but supposedly in the Langendiebach area NE of Frankfurt/M. in W Germany. History: noted in August 1940 as an unnumbered Einsatzhafen of Leithorst L 3/XII (Langendiebach) with a normal station complement of 32 officers and officials (Beamten) with 650 NCOs and men. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Allenstein-Deuthen (GER) (today: Olsztyn-Dajki/Poland) (53 46 22 N – 20 24 46 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in East Prussia 102 km S of Königsberg (Kaliningrad) and 4 km WSW of Allenstein. History: listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz) in 1927, as a secondary airport (Verhehrsflughafen II) in 1932, and as an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in 1939. Used mainly as a practice field for gliders during the war years. Dimensions: approx. 595 x 595 meters (650 x 650 yards) but may have been extended later in the war. Surface and Runways: level turf on sandy soil. No paved runway. Infrastructure: had 2 hangars at the SE corner. Personnel were probably accommodated in the town of Allenstein. The nearest rail line ran 2 km S of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities in mid-1944. Remarks: none. Operational Units: Verbindungsstaffel 60 (Jun 41)? School Units: Arbeitsplatz (gliders) for FFS A/B 125 then FFS A 125 (Neukuhren) (1941-44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Allenstein (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 4/I (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 9/II (Nov 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. Allenstein (1941).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Hei.Flak-Abt. 26/I (1943-44); Sperrfeuerbatterie 200, 201, 203 and 208 (all 6 Sep 41); le.Flak-Abt. 866 (ETr.) (1945); VI./Ln.-Rgt. Ob.d.L. (6 Sep 41); 2.(Flum.)/Ln.-Flugmelde-Rgt. 91 (1943-44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.489- (15 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Aller (GER): see Verden. Alpen (GER): see Bönninghardt. Alperstedt (GER) (51 05 10 N – 11 04 45 E) General: operational airfield in Thuringia 12 km NNE of Erfurt; airfield 1.6 km SE of the village of Alperstedt. History: listed as an Einsatzhafen I in 1939. Little use by active units until fall 1944 when single-engine fighters were stationed there. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1100 x 1100 yards) and roughly square in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel available. A small ammunition dump was off the SE corner. Infrastructure: no hangars but a few workshop-type buildings were located off the NW and SE corners. A small group of barrack buildings was off the NW corner. The nearest rail connection was at Grossrudestedt, 2.4 km NE of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: no information. Remarks: 6 Dec 44: bombed – 1 x Bf 109G from II./JG 3 destroyed. Operational Units: I./JG 302 (Aug-Sep 44); III./JG 301 (Oct 44); II./JG 3 (Oct 44 – Feb 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 1.(F)/Erg.Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.H. (1940 – Apr 42). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Alperstedt (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 6/IV (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 20/IV (1941); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 33/III Weimar-Nohra (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.493 (14 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Alpirsbach (GER) (48 20 07 N – 08 24 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 56 km NE of Freiburg and 15 km S of Freudenstadt. Exact location of landing ground unknown. History: in existence from fall 1944 but no record of any activity there. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Altefeld (GER) (a.k.a. Altefeld, Herleshausen) (51 03 08 N – 10 07 17 E) General: airfield (Flugplatz) in Hesse 15.5 km SSE of Eschwege in C Germany. Exact location of the airfield in relation to the hamlet of Altefeld in not known. History: operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Altenburg (GER) (50 58 40 N – 12 30 45 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Thuringia 40.5 km S of Leipzig, 5 km ESE of Altenburg and 1.6 km N of the village of Nobitz. History: opened as a tiny sports field in 1913 and then taken over by the military in 1916 but abandoned after World War I in accordance with the Versaille Treaty. World War II construction began in 1935 and it was ordered inaugurated as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur on or about 1 October 1936. Used for elementary, advanced and instrument flight training, technical training and single-engine night fighter training. A Junkers aircraft testing operation was also located there. Night fighters were based at Altenburg in 1945. Dimensions: approx. 1210 x 1050 meters (1320 x 1150 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Had a single approx. 1235 meter (1350 yard) concrete runway aligned NNE/SSW along with 2 paved, wedge-shaped starting platforms, one on the W side and the other on the E side of the landing area. Off-runway paved taxiways ran on the N and E sides of the field, and a short, ladder-type servicing hardstand was located on the N boundary. Equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstand and underground bulk fuel storage tanks were adjacent to these. A refueling loop and more buried fuel tanks were off the NE corner. A small ammunition dump was sited about 900 meters S of the airfield. Infrastructure: had 3 very large hangars and 1 large hangar off the NE corner, and 3 very large hangars off the E boundary. All 7 had paved hangar aprons and had some separate workshop buildings. A small cluster of buildings off the SE corner were probably used as additional workshops. The main station buildings were located in the woods off the NE boundary and included barracks, quarters, messes, admin offices, dispensary, etc. The flight control building was at the NE corner. A branch raid line to Altenburg served the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: layout of Flak positions not identified. Remarks: - 12 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 17 Mar 45: city bombed by 36 B-17 Fortresses. 14 Apr 45: Altenburg taken by U.S. 6th Armored Div. Operational Units: III./KG 3 (May - ? 1939); KGr. z.b.V. 105 (Mar 41); II./JG 301 (Oct-Nov 43); Stab, I., II./KG 3 (Jun-Jul 44); I., II./NJG 5 (Feb-Apr 45). School Units: Schule/FAR 31 (1939); FFS C 9 (Jan 40 – Oct 42); FFS A/B 33 (Jul 42 – May 43); BFS 10 (May – Oct 43); Stab and I./JG 110 (Oct 43 – Feb 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Altenburg (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 27/IV (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 35/III (1944-45). Station and Town Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/4. Jagddivision (Nov 44); Koflug Altenburg (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 1/IV (Apr-Dec 41); elements of Werft-Abt. 1/III (Dec 44); elements of schw.Flak-Abt. 564 (May-Jun 44); Flak-Battr. z.b.V. 5553 (Jun 44); Lw.-Bau-Btl. Altenburg (1939); Geheime Feldpolizei-Ers.Kp. d.Lw. (c.1943-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.490-92 (1 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Altengrabow (GER) (52 08 45 N – 12 08 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Brandenburg/C Germany 38 km ENE of Magdeburg, 6.5 km SSW of Altengrabow and 2.8 km SSE of Gross Lübars. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) with rolled grass surface. 1939 re-listed as an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen). Upgraded from an obscure wartime practice field for flight students to operational status in mid-1944 with some construction work such as the dispersal area noted below. A large Army training area (Truppenübungsplatz) was located nearby as well as Stalag XI A, which was jammed with 20,000 POWs in early 1945. Dimensions: had a prepared strip or runway 1650 meters (1800 yards) aligned WNW/ESE. Surface and Runways: grass surface. no paved runway noted as of 10 Apr 45. Infrastructure: unknown, but a few temporary buildings may have been built in the surrounding woods. Dispersal: blast bays were cut into the woods to the E of the landing area. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 6 Aug 44: low-level attack – 1 x Si 204B and 1 x Fw 58 from Fluglehrerschule d.Lw. destroyed (1) or damaged (1). 2 or 3 Mar 45: low-level attack by approx. 7 VIII Fighter Command P51s - 2 x Ju 188 E-1s and 1 x He 111 H-6 from I./KG 200 plus 10 x Ju

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 88As and 8 x Fw 190s from II./KG 200 destroyed (13) or damaged (8). (German reports) 16 Apr 45: strafed by 9th AAF P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 11 planes destroyed and another 13 damaged, 5 of which were 2-plane Mistel combinations consisting of an He 111 with an attached Bf 109. Operational Units: used by I. and II./KG 200 (Feb-Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Aussenkdo. Quedlinburg/Fluglehrerschule Brandenburg-Briest (Apr 39 – 1945). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: none noted. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none found. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.459; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Altenkirchen (GER) (50 42 13 N – 07 38 42 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz in W Germany 40 km ESE of Bonn. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found other than as given below. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. No paved runway. Infrastructure: none reported. Operational Units: elements of NSGr. 2 (Feb 45). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 32 (Schöneberg, Dec 44, Jan 45); Stab I./(Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 32 (Hamm/Sieg, Dec 44, Jan 45); Stab II.(Feldfernkabel-Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. 32 (Wissen, Dec 44, Jan 45); 9.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 52 (Oct 44)?; Stab I.(Funknavigation)/Ln.-Rgt. 54 (Gieleroth, c.Oct 44 – Feb 45); Ln.Verbindungs-Kp. z.b.V. 17 (Jan 45); Flieger-Geräteausgabestelle (mot) 102/XI (Dec 44). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Alteno (GER) (a.k.a. Luckau) (51 52 20 N – 13 47 20 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Brandenburg 39 km WNW of Cottbus in NE Germany, 5.25 km ENE of Luckau and 2 km NW of the hamlet of Alteno. History: construction completed in 1938. Spend most of the war as a practice field for twi-engine trainers. Single-engine fighters used it from fall 1944 to early 1945. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 1050 meters (1150 x 1150 yards) and roughly square in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. May have had perimeter lighting. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were located at the SW corner. A small ammunition dump was in the woods 1.6 km WSW of the landing area.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Infrastructure: a few workshop-type buildings and the flight control building were off the SW corner. A few barrack huts were in the woods off the W boundary. A branch rail line served the N and W boundaries of the airfield. Dispersal: there were 2 “Dutch barn” aircraft shelters off the SW corner and another under construction in May 44. Each measured about 70 meters in length (225 feet). A number of aircraft bays were also cut into the woods off the E and W boundaries. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: III./JG 4 (Oct-Nov 44); III./JG 301 (Jan-Feb 45); I./SG 77 (Feb-Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for elementary flight school then twinengined conversion school Alt-Lönnewitz (1936 – Jan 40), FFS C 3 then FFS B 3 (Jan 40 – Jul 44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 7 (Finisterwalde (1940-43); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 9 (Altenburg) (Jan 40 – Oct 42); Arbeitsplatz for Aussenkdo. Quedlinburg/Fluglehrerschule Brandenburg-Briest (Apr 39 – 1945). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Alteno (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 12/IV (c. Feb - May 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 1/IV (1941?); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 24/III Jüterbog-Waldlager (1944); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 101/I Finsterwalde (c. Nov 44 – Feb 45); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 273/III (1945). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Maj. Erich Scheibner (15 Jul 42 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Auffangkdo. d.Lw. Luckau (Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.712-13 (20 Jun 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Altenstadt (GER) (50 16 30 N – 08 58 15 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 25.6 km NE of Frankfurt/M. in W Germany, 17.6 km SSE of Bad Nauheim and 1.6 km SE of Altenstadt. History: construction began at the end of 1935 and was in use by a He 111 bomber unit during 1938-39. Served school units exclusively until September 1944. Dimensions: 1,000 x 900 meters. Runway: initially a grass surface, but later a hardened or reinforced runway was put down and then covered with a thin layer of dirt for camouflage purposes. Allied air reconnaissance reported only grass on 25 Feb 44. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications and other amenities were available. Had a single large hangar with a concrete - 15 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 foundation, a command bunker, numerous munitions bunkers and a number of other buildings. Barracks and other accommodations were located in woods off the S boundary and off the SW corner. A branch rail line service the S and W boundaries. Dispersal: none seen in February 1944. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 5 Jan 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Bf 109s and 2 x Ju 88s destroyed. Mar 45: evacuated by the station personnel after blowing up many of the buildings. Operational Units: I./JG 11 (Sep-Oct 44); III./JG 2 (Oct-Dec 44); 2./LLG 1 (Oct 44); Staffel z.b.V. Reich (Oct 44 – Jan 45); elements of JG 4 (Nov 44 – Jan 45). School Units: glider Arbeitsplatz for Fluglehrerschule BrandenburgBriest (Apr 39 – Apr 45); Arbeitsplatz for Segelausbildungsstelle für Flugzeugführerschulen A/B (Gelnhausen) (1941-44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Altenstadt (26 Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 16/XII (Mar 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 22/VII Langendiebach (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): le.Feldwerft-Staffel 3/10 (1 Jan 45); Feldmunitionslager z.b.V. 10/XI (1 Jan 45); Methanoltanklager (1 Jan 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.38-39 (25 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Alterkülz (GER) (50 01 54 N – 07 27 46 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 36 km SSW of Koblenz and 4.5 km SSW of Kastellaun. History: brief use during the May 1940 attack into France, Belgium and Holland. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 5/VIII (May 40). [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Altjührden (GER) (53 22 00 N – 08 04 00 E) General: Arbeitsplatz in NW Germany 24.5 km NNW of Oldenburg, 2.5 km WSW of Obenstrohe and adjacent to the tiny hamlet of Altjührden. History: No further information or mention of operational wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. School Units: Arbeitsplatz (practice field) for Schule/FAR 32 (Oldenburg) (1939). [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Altkemnitz (GER) (a.k.a. Alt Kemnitz; Stara Kamienica) (50 54 30 N – 15 36 00 E ?)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 105 km WSW of Breslau (Wrocław) in Silesia in SE Germany, 9.5 km W of Hirschberg (Jelenia Gora) and just E of the hamlet of Stara Kamienica. History: no information aside from brief use by fighters in the second half of Apr 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. No paved runway. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: I./JG 52 (Apr 45). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Alt-Lönnewitz (GER) (51 32 50 N – 13 13 10 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Brandenburg 63 km ENE of Leipzig in E Germany, 4.25 km SSW of Falkenberg/Elster and immediately NW of Alt-Lönnewitz. History: ordered inaugurated as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur on or about 1 October 1936 on the site of a small civil airfield that had existed since the 1920’s. It was a factory airfield for Arado/Brandenburg at one time. Used by training units to July/August 1944 and then by operational units, mainly Ar 234 jet bomber units and a number of reconnaissance units. 1945-1991: Soviet Air Force base. After 1991, three of the original hangars taken over by a woodworking firm and the airfield used by civil aviation. Dimensions: approx. 1465 x 730 meters (1600 x 800 yards) and kidney-shaped. Surface and Runways: Partially paved grass surface. The single concrete runway measured approx. 1465 meters (1600 yards) and had an E/W alignment. A perimeter road ran along the N boundary and the runway was connected by a taxiway to the buildings on the N side of the field. Equipped with boundary and obstruction and runway lighting, and there was a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were located on servicing handstands off the N boundary immediately E of the hangars and at the SE corner. Another group of refueling points was on the S boundary. Infrastructure: had 3 large and 3 medium flight hangars and 1 large repair hangar, all with paved aprons. The main group of station buildings was off the N boundary behind the hangars and included admin offices, barracks, messes, canteens, etc. Additional barracks were NE of the station, off the SE corner and in the village of AltLönnewitz. A branch rail line served the NE side of the airfield. Dispersal: there were no organized dispersal facilities in Mar 44. Defenses: no information. Remarks:

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 11 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 3 x Ju 88s destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109, 1 x Ju 88, 1 x Ju 52 and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 21 Mar 45: low-level attack - 2 x Ju 52s from II./TG 3 and 1 x He 111 destroyed on the ground. (German report) 16 Apr 45: strafed by 9th AAF P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 9 planes destroyed and 4 damaged. Operational Units: Stab/KG 76 (Jun 44 – Feb 45); II./KG 76 (Jul-Aug 44); III./KG 76 (Jun-Dec 44); Stab/FAGr. 3 (Feb-Apr 45); 2. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 100 (Feb-Apr 45); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Feb-Apr 45); Aufkl.St. 4.(F) Nacht (Feb-Mar 45); 14.(Eis)/KG 55 (Feb-Apr 45); Staffel z.b.V. Reich (Feb 45); 7./KG 53 (Mar 45); Sonderkommando Herzog (Schleppgruppe 1) (Feb-Apr 45); 3./JG 7 (Apr 45); Stab, 1./NAGr. 1 (Apr 45). School Units: elementary flight school then twin-engined conversion school Alt-Lönnewitz (1936 – Jan 40), FFS C 3 then FFS B 3 (Jan 40 – Jul 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./KG 76 (Aug – Dec 44); III./EKG 1 (Jan – Apr 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Alt-Lönnewitz (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 38/IV (1943 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 36/III (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 2/III (Dec 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.495-99 (25 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Altlussheim (GER): see Speyer. Altona (GER) (a.k.a. Hamburg-Altona, Bahrenfeld) (53 34 30 N – 09 53 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in the western district of Hamburg in N Germany and approx. 8 km W of Hamburg city center. History: a civil flying field from long before the war that was enlarged for military purposes 1934-35. Used mainly for glider training by the NSFK. A small airstrip with administrative buildings and barracks in the built-up outskirts of the city adjacent to a race track. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 960 meters (1,150 x 1,050 yards). Runway: firm grass surface that used camouflage during the war years to tone its color with the surrounding area. Infrastructure: fuel and other amenities as needed. Had a single double-bay hangar in the SE corner that was heavily camouflaged with netting. Barracks, admin buildings and stores were along the S boundary and the control tower was in the SE corner. There was also a cigarette factory in the SE corner and a race track just E of that. Nearest rail connection 2.5 km E of the airfield. Dispersal: none (Sep 43). - 18 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: 2 heavy and 3 light Flak positions were in the immediate vicinity of the airfield which was also protected by the Flak batteries that protected Hanburg. Remarks: repeatedly bombed during the war as part of the greater Hamburg area. No details found concerning the airfield itself. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.232-36 (12 Sep 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Alt Rosenberg (GER) (today Gemina Olesno) (c. 50 53 05 N – 18 25 52 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 42 km NE of Oppeln (Opole) in Silesia in SE Germany and 1.5 km NE of present day Gemina Olesno. History: brief use during the attack on Poland on 1 Sep 39. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Operational Units: II.(Schlacht)/LG 2 (Sep 39). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Alt Siedel (GER) (a.k.a. Altsiedel) (c. 50 35 04 N – 18 13 54 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 23.4 km SE of Oppeln (Opole) in Silesia/SE Germany near present-day village of Grodzisko. History: aside from brief use during the invasion of Poland, no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Operational Units: II.(Schlacht)/LG 2 (Sep 39). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Altwarp (GER) (53 44 30 N – 15 15 30 E) General: Landeplatz (landing field or landing ground) 39 km NNW of Stettin in NE Germany. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. No paved runway. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Amberg-Köfering (GER) (49 25 00 N – 11 50 30 E) General: small pre-war civil sports ground. No record of use by the Luftwaffe. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.452 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Amberg-Kümmersbruck (GER) (49 26 00 N – 11 54 00 E) General: small pre-war civil sports ground. No record of use by the Luftwaffe.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.452 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Amberg-Schafhof (GER) (49 23 50 N – 11 58 50 E) General: operational airfield (classified as an Einsatzhafen II in 1939) 57 km E of Nürnberg in Bavaria in S Germany; airfield located 9 km SE of Amberg, immediately S of Schafhof Farm in the Freiholser Forest. History: construction began 1 March 1937, completed a little over a year later, and first used by a Luftwaffe unit in fall 1938. Used by training units during the war. Dimensions: approx. 460 x 960 meters (500 x 1050 yards) aligned E/W. Runway: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: had an aircraft fueling station. Infrastructure: 3 medium hangars along the S boundary with workshops between them, and 11 large barrack buildings of concrete and wood. Nearest rail connection 1.6 km to the N of the airfield. Dispersal: had a Southeast dispersal and a Northwest dispersal with a total of 2 small Dutch-type barn aircraft shelters and 15+ aircraft bays cut into the woods that were connected to the landing area by taxi tracks. Remarks: from spring 1944, Bf 109G and Bf 109K factory acceptance flights were carried out there. Flight training ceased in February 1945 and Schafhof occupied by elements of SG 151. 8 Apr 45: U.S. fighter-bombers flew the first attack on the field followed by several more during next 10 days. 18 Apr 45: abandoned by the Luftwaffe and captured by U.S. forces several days later. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS C Roth-Kiliansdorf (1939); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 4 (Wien-Schwechat); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 63 then FFS A/B 63 (Marienbad) (1939-41); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 43, FFS A/B 43 then FFS A 43 (Crailsheim); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 111 (Roth) (1941-42); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 121 then FFS A 121 (Straubing) (1940-45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./SG 151 (Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Amberg-Schafhof (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 30/XIII (Mar 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XII Fürth (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 32/VII Fürth (Jun 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.60 (7 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Amrum (GER) (c. 54 39 54 N – 08 19 50 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) on Amrum Island off the W coast of Schleswig-Holstein in NW Germany. History: no further

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Angermünde (GER) (53 02 06 N – 13 59 55 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 72 km NNE of Berlin in Brandenburg in NE Germany, 6.8 km WSW of Pinnow and 2.25 km N of of the town of Angermünde. History: Ordered established by the Luftwaffe by 1 October 1936. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Anklam (GER) (53 50 00 N – 13 40 15 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Mecklenburg/W Pomerania in NE Germany 55 km NW of Stettin, 43 km NNE of Neubrandenburg, and 3.25 km S of the town of Anklam. History: constructed 1936-37 and inaugurated as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur on or about 1 October 1936. Served mainly as an air park (depot) and training airfield. A branch of the Arado firm that produced component parts for aircraft was located on the eastern outskirts of Anklam just 3.25 km from the center of the airfield. Single-engine fighters were based at Anklam from Oct 44 to Apr 45. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 1370 meters (1000 x 1500 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Airfield equipped with boundary lighting. Fuel and Ammunition: available. Infrastructure: had at least 5 hangars with paved aprons. A barracks complex was located off the N boundary to the rear of the storage sheds. A special branch rail line served the N boundary and the station ammunition dump. Dispersal: there were 4 areas – Northwest, Southwest, South and Perimeter with a total of 20 large open aircraft shelters, 1 small open shelter and 2 parking sites. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 4 Aug 44: airfield and the Arado plant bombed by 180 B-17 Fortresses and strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 3 x Ju 88s destroyed and 2 more damaged. Results of the bombing believed to have been severe. 25 Aug 44: airfield bombed by 73 B-17s and strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 4 x Ju 88s and 1 x Me 210 destroyed, plus 2 x Me 210s damaged. Results of the bombing unknown. - 21 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: III./St.G. 162 (Apr-Sep 37); III./KG 53 (Jun-Jul 42); 3./Gruppe Nord (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (May 43 – c. 1944); II./KG 4 (04.45); Flugzeugschleuse Luftflottenkdo. 5 (1944); III./JG 1 (Oct-Dec 44, Mar-Apr 45); II./KG 4 (Apr 45). School Units: Navigationslehrgang/BFS Brandis (Oct 37 - ? ); Arbeitsplatz for twin-engined conversion school Neubrandenburg, FFS C 5 then FFS B 5 (Sep 39 – Feb 45); Bombenschule Anklam (Apr 39 – Nov 41); I./Kampfschulgeschwader 1 (Nov 41 – 1942). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Anklam (to Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 47/III (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/III (Apr 44 - 1945). Kdt.: Oberst Viktor Carganico ( ? - Sep 39); Oberst Otto Schlüter ( ? - 1 Oct 42); Oberst Rudolf Bretting (1 Oct 42 - ? ) Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftpark Anklam (later Luftpark 1/III) (c.1939-45); 4.(Java II)/Ln.-Flugmelde-Abt. (E) z.b.V. 21 (Feb-Mar 45); Stab/Ln.-Abt. 71 (Mar 45); Traktorenzug d.Lw. 1/III ( ? – c.Aug 42). [Sources: AFHRA A5257p.1013 (1941-42) and A5258 pp.500-01 (26 Apr 44 updated to 13 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Annafeld (GER) (coordinates unknown) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 25 km NE of Schneidemühl (Piła) in Pomerania in NE Germany near the town of Flatow (Zlotów). Exact location not found. History: in use during the opening of the attack on Poland on 1 Sep 39, but no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: III./St.G. 2 (Sep 39). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ansbach (GER) (49 18 30 N – 10 38 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Bavaria 35 km SW of Nürnberg in S Germany; airfield located 4.8 km E of the city and close to the village of Katterbach. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing area (Notlandeplatz). Ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936 after a year of construction. 1939 upgraded to a Leithorst (main or controlling air base). Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 915 meters (1200 x 1000 yards) aligned N/S. Surface and Runways: grass surface with serviceability problems in wet weather. No paved runway, but there were 2 concrete starting platforms, one on the W boundary and the other on the E boundary. Concrete taxiways connected the platforms to the aprons in front of - 22 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 the hangars. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, a flare-path and a beam approach system for night operations. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points and underground storage tanks were at the center of N boundary and 3 more refueling points along the S boundary. The station ammunition dump was served by a branch rail line at the SW corner. Infrastructure: there were 7 hangars of metal construction including a repair hangar and all had paved hangar aprons. Station HQ, barracks, messes, admin offices, motor pool, garages and other station buildings were all arranged behind the hangars. Additional workshop buildings were at the NE corner. A special branch rail line served the airfield. Dispersal: used both perimeter and remote dispersal, some of the latter being on the E side 2 km from the center of the landing area. Defenses: had 5 light Flak positions with 12 guns, some in Flak towers and some on rooftops. The airfield was surrounded by barbed wire. Remarks: 22 Feb 45: Ansbach marshalling yard bombed as a target of opportunity by 143 B-17 Fortresses. 23 Feb 45: Ansbach marshalling yard bombed by 109 B-17s. 8 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Bf 109 destroyed and another damaged. Operational Units: Stab, II./KG 155 (Apr 36 – 1937/38); Stab, I./KG 355 (Jul 38 – Apr 39); Stab, I./KG 53 (May 39 – Feb 40), 1. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Aug-Oct 39); Stab, II./KG 2 (Feb-May 40); III./KG 40 (Jun-Jul 41); II./KG 77 (Sep 41 – Jan 42); III./KG 53 (Jan–c.Jul 42); 15.(kroat.)/KG 53 (May-Jul 42); I./KG 76 (Mar-May 43); Stab, I./ZG 76 (Aug 43 – Apr 44); III./JG 3 (May-Jun 44); Stab/JG z.b.V. (May-Jun 44); Stab/JG 4 (Jun 44); IV./JG 3 (Jul-Jul 44); Sonderverband “Einhorn”KG 200 (Aug-Sep 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 15 (Gablingen) (Oct 40 – Jan 43); Verbandsführerschule/KG 101 (May – Aug 44); Verbandsführerschule/General der Kampfflieger (Aug 44 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./KG 6 (Oct 41 – Mar 42); IV./KG 53 (Apr 42 – Jan 43); I./EKG (J) and 6. and 7./EKG (J) (Feb – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Ansbach (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 15/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 31/VII (Jun 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command): Obstlt. Arthur Dettweiler ( ? ? ) 6/42. 7/42; Obstlt. Georg Steinsiek (6 Aug 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): General d.Kampfflieger (L.In. 2) (Mar-Apr 45); Koflug Ansbach (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 6/XIII (Apr 41 – Feb 43); Koflug 14/VII (Wickelsgreuth - 23 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Jan-Apr 45); Werft-Abt.(o) 1/XII (1944-45); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 53 (May 39 – Feb 40); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 53 (May 39 – Feb 40); 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 2; 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 101 (Aug 44); le.Flak-Abt. 83 (mot.) (Mar-Aug 39); 1./le.Flak-Abt. 951 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); mittl.Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 38/VII (Dec 44 – Apr 45); Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 31/VII (Jan-Feb 45); II./Ln.-Rgt. 13 (Jan-Feb 45); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 15/XIII (Nov 40); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 17/XIII (Apr 40); E-HafenAusrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Ansbach; E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 1/VIII; Kfz.Beständelager d.Lw. 6/VII A (Jun 44). Station Occupancy and Strength on 25 Jun 44 (officers/NCOs and officials/men/civilians): Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 31/VII (4/96/193/641); Stab/JG 4 and 1./SAGr. 131 (6/78/97/3); IV./JG 3 and 2./JG 51 (31/219/452/ - ); Verbandslehrgang/KG 101 (12/294/250/ - ); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 951 (2/10/61/ - ); Dornier Flugzeugwerk ( - / - / - / 150). Total station occupancy: 55 officers, 697 NCOs and officials, 1,053 men, 794 civilians = 2,599. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.61-65 (20 Dec 43 updated to 24 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Arys-Rostken (GER) (today Rostki) (c. 53 43 10 N – 21 55 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 143 km SE of Königsberg in East Prussia, 11.5 km S of Arys (Orzysz), 11.5 km NE of Johannisburg (Pisz) and immediately NNE of the village of Rostken (Rostki). History: listed as an Einsatzhafen in 1939. Operational units briefly there for the attack on Poland in 1939 and then again for the attack on Russia in Jun 41. Otherwise, it was used mainly as a practice field for trainers. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface with a take-off and landinging run of at least 915 meters (1000 yards) possible. Infrastructure: a few buildings and/or sheds for repair and maintenance were probably available. The nearest rail connection was 5 km WNW on the Johannisburg-Arys line. Remarks: 23 Jan 45: town of Arys and airfield taken by Soviet forces. Operational Units: 3./JG 1 (Aug-Sep 39); I./JG 21 (Sep 39); Stab, I./KG 2 (Jun 41); Stab, 1./NAGr. 3 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); 2./NAGr. 4 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); elements of IV.(Pz.)/SG 9 (Dec 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for BFS 7 (Insterburg) (Nov 40 – May 41); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 21 (Białystok) (Sep 41 – Nov 43); Einsatzgruppe/2. Fliegerschuldivision (Aug-Oct 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Arys-Rostken (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 8/IV (May – Jun 41); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 3/I (1941); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 19/II (Sep 41). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Lw.-Bau-Btl. 23/XI (Jun 41); Traktorenzug 1/VI (6 Sep 41); 2.Zug of Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 1/I (6 Sep 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 93/VI (6 Sep 41). - 24 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.502 (28 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Asbach (GER) (a.k.a. Eudenbach) (50 40 35 N – 07 21 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 19.2 km ESE of Bonn in Rhineland-Pfalz in western Germany, 4 km WNW of Asbach and 2 km SE of Eudenbach. History: built 1938-39, this mainly consisting of extensive leveling and drainage work. Not believed to have been used in a significant sense until fall 1944 when a day fighter unit was based there. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 825 meters (1,300 x 900 yards). Runway: grass surface. Plagued by soft ground during the rainy season. Infrastructure: fuel and refueling points were available. No hangars, but there was a small group of barrack huts off the NW corner of the landing area. Personnel were also billeted in the nearby village of Bucholz. Nearest rail connection 2.4 km to the W on a local line to Bonn. Dispersal: no organized dispersal areas as of February 1945. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 9 Mar 45: airfield ordered immediately destroyed and evacuated. Operational Units: II./JG 6 (Sep-Oct 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Eudenbach (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 15/VI (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/VI?; Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 212/XI (Oct 44 – Feb 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/II. Jagdkorps (Flammersfeld, Sep 44 – Jan 45); Stab/15. Fliegerdivision (Flammersfeld, Jan-Mar 45); I.(Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. beim II. Jagdkorps (Flammersfeld, Sep 44 – Jan 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.164 (27 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Aschaffenburg (GER) (49 58 00 N – 09 11 00 E) General: existed for many years prior to the war as a small civil landing ground. No record of use by the Luftwaffe. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.452 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Aschersleben (GER) (51 46 40 N – 11 25 40 E) General: landing ground/factory airfield (Landeplatz/Industriehafen) in Anhalt in C Germany 50 km SSW of Magdeburg and 44.5 km NW of Halle; airfield located 3.25 km NNW of Aschersleben. History: listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in 1927. Later, a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for the Junkers firm where aircraft fuselages were produced. Surface and Dimensions: poorly drained grass surface measuring approx. 460 x 550 meters (500 x 600 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. No paved runway.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Infrastructure: had a few small buildings off the N corner. The buildings of the Junkers factory were off the SE boundary and consisted of workshops, machine shops, a boiler house, etc. Other factory buildings were on the E side of the Aschersleben-Wilsleben road and accessed by way of a loop road. Barracks, offices, canteens, stores, etc., were located within the factory complex. A branch rail line served the factory buildings. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: Flak dispositions unknown. Remarks: 22 Feb 44: airfield and factory bombed by 34 B-17 Fortresses. 29 Jun 44: city and area bombed by 47 B-24 Liberators. 7 Jul 44: airfield and factory bombed by 73 B-24s. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 62 (Quedlinburg) (193940); Arbeitsplatz for Überprüfungslehrgang LF Prenzlau/Salzwedel (Jun – Dec 43). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Flak-Ers.Abt. 4 (c. 1940-43); Fallschirm-Ers.Btl. 1 (1944-45). Station Commands: none identified. Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): schw.Flak-Abt. 226(o) (Apr 44 – 1945); Flakscheinw.Abt. 359(v) (1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 461(o) (193940); gem.Flak-Abt. 665(v) (May 42); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 58 (summer 44 – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.503 (29 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Aslau (GER) (51 18 24 N – 15 43 08 E) or (51 18 40 N – 15 44 20 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) (today Osla) in Silesia in SE Germany, 32 km SSE of Sprottau, 32 km WNW of Liegnitz (Legnica), 12 km ENE of Bunzlau and 1.6 km SW of the village of Aslau (Osla). History: constructed between 1935 and 1938 as an Einsatzhafen I. Ordnung; first in use 1938-39. Used by school units throughout the war, and operational units not based there after September 1939 until October 1944 when night fighters and ground attack units were based there. Dimensions: approx. 1,100 x 825 meters (1200 x 900 yards) and rectangular in shape. Runway: good grass surface with a perimeter taxiway encircling the landing area. Probably equipped for night landings. Infrastructure: had 1 very large assembly hangar (233 x 41 meters), 4 more very large hangars and 1 large repair hangar, all of which were - 26 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 fronted by concrete aprons and connected to the taxiway. A group of workshop and stores buildings were located in the hangar area, and there was a further group of workshops at the SE corner of the landing area. A small barracks complex was situated to the rear of the assembly hangar, and a block of admin buildings was along the airfield’s SW boundary. The Berlin-Breslau Autobahn paralleled the S boundry of the landing area at a distance of less than 1 kilometer and a branch rail line served the hangar area. Dispersal: none noted (8 Apr 44). Defenses: none noted (8 Apr 44). Remarks: major development and building construction during the war for use as a factory and repair airfield. Foche-Wulf Fw 190 A-8 and D-9 assembly there by Concordia Aslau (or Weser Flugzeugbau GmbH?) beginning in late 1944 to early February 1945. Sub-camps Aslau and Bunzlau II of Konzentrationslager Gross-Rosen provided inmate labor at the airfield. 11 Feb 45: selective evacuation westward of airfield tenants and personnel began as Soviet forces advanced into Silesia. Operational Units: (go to Google and enter: Aslau site:ww2.dk ). Also: III./KG z.b.V. 1 (Sep 39); KGr. z.b.V. 9 (Sep 39); 3./NSGr. 4 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); 10.(Pz.)/SG 77 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); II./SG 77 (JanFeb 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS C Sprottau, FFS C 4 then FFS B 4 (Nov 39 – Jan 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 4./Erg.JG 1 (Nov 44 – Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) 38 then Fl.H.Kdtr. E Aslau (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 18/IV (c. Feb – Apr 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 8/IV (1941 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/VIII Liegnitz (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.504-06 (26 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Astfeld (GER) (51 56 04 N – 10 22 57 E) General: landing ground in Lower Saxony 3.5 km NW of Goslar. History: in existence by 1 Dec 44 and probably a satellite or auxiliary landing ground for nearby Goslar airfield. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Augsburg (GER) (48 22 N – 10 53 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): - 27 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/V. Fliegerkorps (A-Gersthofen, Oct 39 – May/Jun 40); Stab/5. Fliegerdivision (AGersthofen, Sep 39). Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: none. Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Flakscheinwerfer-Rgt. 2(o) (as Flakgruppe Augsburg) (Jul 42 – Apr 44); Flak-Rgt. 18 (as Flakabwehrkdo. Augsburg) (Oct 39 – Apr 40); Flak-Rgt. 19(o) (as Flakgruppe Augsburg) (Apr 40 – Jun 41); Flak-Rgt. 66(o) (Jul 41 - Aug 42?); Flak-Rgt. 115 (as Flakgruppe Augsburg) (May 44 – Apr 45); Flak-Rgt. 135 (mot.) (Sep-Nov 41). Flak-Abt.: I./Flak-Rgt. 37 (gem. mot.); I./Flak-Rgt. 54 (gem. mot.); schw.117(o); schw.136(o); schw.137(o); schw.151(o); gem.385(o); schw.405(o); schw.443(o); schw.444 (Eisb.); schw.446(o); schw.452(v); schw.453(o); schw.458(o); schw.506(o); schw.514(o); schw.522(o); schw.542(o); schw.571(o); schw.572(o); schw.612(o); le.738(o); le.825 (Eisb.); le.844(o); schw.902 (Eisb.). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 200(o); 228(o); 340(o); 509(v); 578(o); 582(o); 675(v). Luftsperr-Abt.: none. Flak-Ers./Flak-Ausb.: Flak-Ers.Abt. 15. Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): elements of Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 38 (1942 – Apr 45). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): elements of Ln.-Rgt. 15 (Oct 35 – Jun 38); Stab and I.(Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 35 (May 40); Stab II./Ln.Rgt. 215 (c.Nov 43 – 1944); Stab, I. and II./Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 7 (APfersee – Jul 38 – 1944); 15.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 7 (1944); Stab and I./Ln.-Ers.-u.Ausb.Rgt. 3 (A-Pfersee, Apr 44 - 1945); Flugmeldemesszug (o) z.b.V. 8 (1944-45); Luftgaubereichswerkstatt (N) 1/VII (A-Pfersee, c.1942-44); Fluko Augsburg. Ground Transport (Transportkolonnen): Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 110/VII (A-Pfersee, 1944-45). Augsburg-Haunstetten (GER) (48 20 00 N – 10 54 05 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) for the Messerschmitt aircraft firm 55 km NW of Munich in Bavaria in S Germany; airstrip 4 km S of Augsburg and 2.8 km NNW of the village of Haunstetten. History: existed well before the war and was the location of a small aircraft factory in the early 1930’s. The Messerschmitt factory was continuously expanded during the war and by 1944 consisted of a huge complex taking up the entire NE, E and SE boundaries of the airfield. In addition to the assembly of Bf 110 fighters, the factory was also a research and experimental facility. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 825 meters (1400 x 900 yards) and rectangular in shape.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Surface and Runways: firm, well drained grass surface. No paved runways. Equipped for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: available. Infrastructure: there were numerous hangars with paved aprons, factory workshops, drawing offices, etc., along the N, E and S bountaries and on the E side of the Augsburg-Landsberg road about 1.2 km from the SE corner of the landing area. Station admin offices were off the NE corner of the landing area. Served by a branch rail line with several sidings that led to the factory buildings. Dispersal: the North dispersal was along the perimeter and had 4 medium open aircraft shelters covered with netting; the South perimeter dispersal had 30 medium open aircraft shelters of which 15 were covered with netting; and, the South dispersal to the rear of the hangars had 8 medium open aircraft shelters. Defenses: very heavy Flak defenses with 9 heavy Flak positions of which at least 4 had 6 guns each, and 14 light Flak positions, most of these in Flak towers and mounted on rooftops. Remarks: 19 Dec 43: factory and airfield bombed by 50 15th AAF B-24 Liberators with poor results due to lack of target visibility. 25 Feb 44: factory and airfield bombed by 196 B-17 Fortresses – post raid photos showed damage and fires in the factory buildings and experimental hangar at the NE end of the field and also damage to hangars and workshops at the SE end. 16 Mar 44: factory and airfield bombed by 401 B-17s. 13 Apr 44: factory and airfield bombed by 207 B-17s. 11 Jul 44: factory and airfield bombed by 29 B-24 Liberators as a target of opportunity. 16 Jul 44: city bombed by 54 B-17s. 19 Jul 44: factory and airfield bombed by 123 B-17s. 27 Feb 45: Augsburg marshaling yard bombed by 15th AAF – some of the airfield hangars were hit during the raid. 1 Mar 45: Augsburg bombed by 62 B-24s. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: LNS 3 (Jul 38 – 1940); LNS 4 (Oct – Nov 39); FliegerTechnischevorschule Augsburg (1939-44). Station Commands: Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/VII Lechfeld (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates at or near the station – not complete): 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 136 (1943-45); 1. and 3./le.Flak-Abt. 738 (Feb-Mar 44); le.Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 20/VII (1944-45); schw.Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 205/VII (1944). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.66-70 (18 Dec 43 updated to 25 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 29 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Aurich (GER): see Brockzetel. Autobahn 1 (GER) (48 25 35 N – 10 15 45 E) General: improvised Autobahn landing strip approx. 1.6 km ESE pf Leipheim airfield to the NE of Ulm. Development began in summer 1944 by clearing the Autobahn’s median strip for a distance of approx. 1830 meters (2000 yards). Aircraft were dispersed in woods S of the landing area. Believed used by Me 262 jets in spring 1945 if not earlier. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.12 (20 Apr 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Autobahn 2 (GER) (48 24 35 N – 10 56 25 E) General: improvised Autobahn landing strip on the NE side of Augsburg approx. 6.5 km NE of Augsburg airfield. At least 2285 meters (2500 yards) of Autobahn was still in the process of being prepared on 23 Mar 45 with aircraft dispersal at the E end of the landing area. At least 5 aircraft shelters and parking areas had already been built by 23 March. The strip was intended for jets. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.13 (21 Apr 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Autobahn 4 (GER) (48 14 00 N – 11 36 15 E) General: improvised Autobahn landing strip 5.7 km from Scheissheim airfield near Munich. Approx 1650 meters (1800 yards) ) of Autobahn was still in the process of being prepared on 20 Apr 45. It is exceedingly doubtful if it was completed of ever used. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.14 (23 Apr 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Autobahn 5 (GER) (48 16 15 N – 11 39 00 E) General: improvised Autobahn landing strip NE of Scheissheim airfield near Munich. Approx 1650 meters (1800 yards) ) of Autobahn was still in the process of being prepared on 20 Apr 45. It is exceedingly doubtful if it was completed of ever used. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.14 (23 Apr 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Autobahn 6 (GER) (53 49 20 N – 10 30 50 E) General: improvised Autobahn landing strip 13.2 km WSW of Lübeck and SE of the village of Reinfeld. Runway: 2,000 meters of concrete roadway with the dividing median removed. Dispersal: some 6 or 7 aircraft shelters were under construction on the E side of the strip when photographed on 26 April 1945 and one Me 262 was seen parked there. Operational Units: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.5 (1 May 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 30 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Autobahn 7 (GER) (48 24 50 N – 10 29 00 E) General: improvised Autobahn landing strip 32.4 km WNW of Augsburg airfield and 5 km SE of the village of Röfingen. At least 1830 meters (2000 yards) of Autobahn was still in the process of being prepared on 20 Apr 45 with aircraft dispersal to be in an adjacent forest. Jet aircraft are known to have used it on 25 April. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.5 (1 May 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

B Babelsberg (GER): see Güterfelde. Babenhausen (GER) (c. 48 09 09 N – 10 14 55 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Bavaria/S Germany 33.5 km SSE of Ulm and 18.5 km NNE of Memmingen. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Babenhausen (GER) (49 57 20 N – 08 58 15 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 27.5 km SE of Frankfurt/M. and 14.5 km W of Aschaffenburg in Hesse; airfield located 1.6 km SE of the town of Babenhausen. Upgraded to an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in 1940. History: military use dates from 3 July 1934 when glider training and a workshop were established there and it remained a glider training field until 28 August 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1300 x 820 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface: grass surface. No paved runway. Infrastructure: had a group of barracks, offices and stores buildings off the NE corner. Nearest rail connection at Babenhausen on the Hanau-Darmstadt line. Remarks: Aug 44: 111 convicts from a nearby prison at Rodgau were used as forced laborers on the airfield. 24 Dec 44: bombed by 100 B-17 Fortresses and heavily damaged; urgent repairs undertaken. 1945: while Babenhausen was bombed on 11 and 13 Feb 45 because it was a rail junction and a garrison town, the airfield was apparently left untouched. 14 Mar 45: bombed by approx. 75 B-26 Marauders – numerous bursts on landing area and airfield rendered unserviceable; at least 3 KIA. (German report) 25 Mar 45: captured by U.S. forces.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: II./KG 53 (c.1-4 Sep 44 or later?); I./JG 77 (SepOct 44); I./JG 11 (Nov-Dec 44); III./JG 4 (Dec 44); II./JG 4 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); I./JG 2 (Feb 45); elements of JG 2, JG 3 and JG 54 (Feb-Mar 45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 221/XII Zellhausen (Nov/Dec 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt.(v) 126/XII (1 Jan 45); Werkstattwagenzug (Fl) 1/XIV (1 Jan 45); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 987 (Dec 44); 4./le.Flak-Abt. 776 (Dec 44 – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.71 (7 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bad Aibling (GER) S Germany (47 52 40 N – 11 59 10 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 46 km SE of Munich in S Germany; airfield located 3 km WNW of the town of Bad Aibling. History: ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Construction completed end of 1936 and began operations April 1937. Upgraded to a Leithorst in 1939. Used mainly as a fighter, night fighter, dive-bomber and elementary flight training station during the war years. Dimensions: had an E/W run of approx. 1465 meters (1600 yards) following an extension off the W boundary. Surface and Runways: hardened (not paved) surface with a large concrete wedge-shaped starting platform on the E side with ample taxiways. Equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: had 4 refueling points with servicing hardstands on the N boundary and 4 more in the SW corner. The ammunition dump was off the NW corner. Infrastructure: had 1 very large repair hangar and 1 large hangar along the N boundary, and 2 large hangars at the NE corner. All 4 had paved hangar aprons. The station motor pool and garages were behind the hangars on the N boundary. The main barrack complex with quarters, mess, kitchens and officers’ mess was just N of the station. A group of 9 huts off the NE corner probably provided additional accommodation. The control tower was on the N boundary between the two groups of hangars, the station HQ was just S of the reservoir and a sports ground was just W of the reservoir. A branch rail line served the hangar area. Dispersal: there was a single dispersal area off the W boundary with 10 large open aircraft shelters, while other aircraft were parked along the W, N and E perimeters. Defenses: several single-gun Flak emplacements existed around the airfield boundary but these were unoccupied when photographed on 1 Feb 44. Remarks: - 32 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 20 Oct 44: bombed by 15th AAF B-17 Fortresses and B-24 Liberators. 16 Feb 45: strafed by 2 fighters – 2 x Fw 190 destroyed, 1 x Bf 110 and 1 x Fw 58 moderately damaged and 1 x Ar 96 lightly damaged. (German report) 16 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 32 destroyed or damaged, mostly Bf 110s and He 111s. Operational Units: I./JG 135 (Apr 37 – Oct 38); II./JG 135 (Jul 38); I./JG 51 (May-Aug 39); JG 71 (Jul-Aug 39); 3./Fliegergeschwader z.b.V. 7 (Aug-Sep 44); III., IV./NJG 6 (Jan-Apr 45); NSGr. 1 (Süd) (Apr 45); I., III./JG 27 (Apr 45); NSGr. 2 (May 45). School Units: 2./Zerstörerschule 1 (Jan – Apr 40); FFS A/B 117 (Oct 40 – Sep 41); Stukavorschule 1 and 2 (Sep 41 – Nov 42); Jagdfliegerschule 3 (Oct – Dec 42); Stab and I./JG 103 (Dec 42 – Feb 43); II./Zerstörerschule 2 (Mar 43); Stab, 3., 4. and II./ZG 101 (Mar 43 – Mar 45); Bomben- und Zielfinderschule Greifswald (Sep 44 – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Aibling (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 1/VII (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 1/VII (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Maximilian Müller ( - ) 9/39 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Aibling (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 2/VII (Apr 41 – Nov 42, Nov 43 – Apr 45); Werft-Abt. 1/VII (1944-45); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 7/VII; Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 151/III (mid-44); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 138/IV (summer 44); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 112/VII (1944-45); Lw.San.Abt. 1/VII. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.51-53 (23 Feb 44 updated to 12 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Cannstatt (GER) (a.k.a. Cannstatt) (48 48 13 N – 09 11 51 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 7 km NE of Stuttgart city center. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Baden-Baden (GER) (a.k.a.Baden Oos) (48 47 45 N – 08 11 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 28 km SSW of Karlsruhe in Baden-Württemberg; airfield 5.25 km NW of Baden-Baden in the suburb of Baden-Oos in SW Germany. History: a small pre-war civil landing ground. Probably used for glider training. Noted as being operational from Aug 43 to Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass - 33 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 turf on a mixture of clay and sand sub-soil that measured approx. 640 x 550 meters (700 x 600 yards). Infrastructure: had 1 long rectangular shed and 2 small hangar-type buildings near the E boundary. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Lw.-Lazarett 14/XI (Baden-Baden, ? – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.430 (11 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Frankenhausen (GER): see Esperstedt. Bad Honnef (GER) (50 38 09 N – 07 13 53 E) General: possibly the location of a late war landing ground that was operational in Feb 45. Bad Honnef is located in North Rhine – Westphalia 15 km SE of Bonn. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Kissingen (GER) (50 12 40 N – 10 04 12 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 20 km NNW of Schweinfurt; airfield 1 km N of Bad Kissingen. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: pasture-land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Langensalza (GER): see Langensalza. Bad Lippspringe (GER): see Lippspringe. Bad Mergentheim (GER): see Mergentheim. Bad Nauheim (GER) (50 20 05 N – 08 47 20 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Hesse 28 km N of Frankfurt/Main; airfield 5 km SE of Bad Nauheim. History: dates from at least 1938 and received some use during the spring 1940 campaign in the West. Glider-towing experiments conducted here in spring 1941. Dimensions: unknown. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Infrastructure: none identified. Remarks: 5 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-38s – claimed 13 x Fw 190s, 1 x Fi 156 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 12 Fw 190s, 2 x Do 217s and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. Operational Units: none identified. Station Units: Lw.-Lazarett 5/XII (Sep 44 – 1945); FliegerUntersuchungsstelle 4/XII (1944-45); Flieger-Untersuchungsstelle

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 6/XII (1944-45); Fachärztliche Behandlungsstelle d.Lw.(o) Bad Nauheim. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.387-88 (13 Jan 44 and updated to 4 Dec 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Oeynhausen (GER) (52 12 30 N – 08 46 23 E) General: airfield in North Rhine – Westphalia 51 km E of Osnabrück and 11.5 km SSW of Minden; airfield located 2 km NW of Bad Oeynhausen. History: 1927 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Orb (GER) (50 13 07N – 09 20 56E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Hesse 49 km ENE of Frankfurt/M. History: laid out in the mid-1930’s and inaugurated as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Luftflottenkdo. 3 (Sep 39 – Jun 40); Stab and I./Ln.-Rgt. 3 (Sep 39 – May 40); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 4/XII (Nov 39). [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Reichenhall (GER) (47 44 20 N – 12 53 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 18 km SW of Salzburg; located 2 km NE of the village of Bad Reichenhall. History: listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz) in 1927, then as a secondary airport in 1932. Surface and Dimensions: firm grass surface on gravel sub-soil measuring approx. 595 x 160 meters (650 x 175 yards). Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar. Operational Units: none. Station Commands: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.432 (30 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Tölz (GER) (47 45 57 N – 11 35 48 E) General: Landeplatz in Bavaria 43 km S of München (Munich); airfield 2.5 km NW of Bad Tölz. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: pasture-land surface. Infrastructure: none noted.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Wörishofen (GER) (48 00 50 N – 10 36 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Bavaria 45 km SSW of Augsburg and 29 km NW of Schongau; airfield located 2 km NE of Bad Wörishofen. History: listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in 1927 and then developed into an operational airfield in the mid1930’s. Used throughout the war as a practice field for single-engine trainers. In mid-1943 it also became an operational fighter station and remained so to the end of the war. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 1000 meters (1000 x 1100 yards) with a square shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. A perimeter track encircles the landing area. Equipped with perimeter lighting. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel storage was off the SE corner. Infrastructure: there were 5 medium hangars in a row that curved around the SE corner and 3 of them had paved hangar aprons. Several barrack buildings were near the edge of the woods off the SE corner. A special branch rail line served the N, S and W sides of the airfield. Dispersal: 20 parking hardstands were located on the edge of the woods along the NE corner. Defenses: 2 light Flak positions and 4 machine gun positions existed in Jan 44. Remarks: none. Operational Units: III./JG 3 (Aug 43 – Feb 44, Apr-May 44); I./JG 4 (Nov-Dec 43); 3./JG 301 (Nov-Dec 43); 3./TGr. 30 (May-Jun 44); Stab, I./JG 300 (Jul-Aug 44); elements of 2./Versuchsverband OKL (May 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS Fürstenfeldbruck/LKS 4 (1937-45); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 23, FFS A/B 23 then FFS A 23 (Kaufbeuren) (1939-45); Stab/JG 101 (Jun 44 – 1944); Verbandsführerschule des General der Jagdflieger (Jan – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Wörishofen (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 5/VII (1940); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 14/VII Kaufbeuren (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. (v) 122/XII (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.421-22 (29 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bad Zwischenahn/Land (GER) (53 12 30N – 07 59 30E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen) 14.3 km WNW of Oldenburg and 2.8 km NNW of Bad Zwischenahn on the west shore of the Zwischenahner Meer. History: construction began in 1936 and the first air units began using it in fall 1937. Used mainly by bombers and long-range reconnaissance units beginning in 1940, later by transport and targettowing planes. The testing, evaluation and pilot training for the Me 163 rocket fighter was carried out here during 1943-44. Dimensions: approx. 1150 x 1370 meters (1,250 x 1,500 yards). Runways: the grass runway was replaced with three concrete runways in the form of a triangle during 1939-40, the longest being 1,400 meters (1530 yards) in length. Extensions were added to the runways during the war to accommodate longer take-off runs. The servicing hardstands were paved and there was an elaborate system of paved taxiways. Equipped with runway, boundary and obstruction lighting, beam approach and the short version of the visual Lorenz system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstands and bulk storage off the S boundary. A large bomb and ammunition dump was off the N boundary. Infrastructure: full servicing and support capability with 5 large hangars, 5 small hangars, workshops, motor pool and garages, barracks, married quarters, and other buildings. A special rail spur enters the airfield on the SE side. Dispersal: there were 5 dispersal areas – Northwest, North, Northeast, Southeast and West with a total of 40 large open blast bays, 8 hardstands and a large number of additional aircraft parking spaces in wooded areas as of October 1944. Defenses: a huge buildup of Flak batteries at Bad Zwischenahn began in Nov 43 and did not end until Sep 44. By late May 1944, there were some 30 batteries deployed on and near the airfield. These were to protect the development of the high priority Me 163 rocket fighter that was intended to have a major role in sweeping the skies of enemy bombers. Satellites and Decoys: Dänikhorst (GER) (53 09 40 N – 07 55 00 E). Dummy 7.3 km WSW of Bad Zwischenahn and 2.8 km NNW of Dänikhorst on Fintlandsmoor. Mock-up included hangars, buildings and runways shaped out of sod and illuminated at night. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.608 (1944)] Remarks: strafed and heavily bombed from 30 May 1944 to nearly the end of the war, and by 24 March 1945 the runways were permanently unserviceable and most of the buildings and hangars were in ruins.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 30 May 44: bombed by 71 B-24 Liberators – 2 x Bf 108s, 6 x Bf 110Gs, 3 x Fw 56s, 1 x He 46, 6 x Me 163, and 10 x gliders from Erprobungs-Kdo. 16 were destroyed or damaged on the ground. 15 Aug 44: bombed by 90 B-24s – 1 x Bf 110G from Erprobungs-Kdo. 16 damaged. 24 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Ju 88 destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 110 and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 21 Mar 45: bombed by 57 B-17 Fortresses – all of the runways and several of the older hangars heavily damaged, landing area less severely hit; power and communications severed; airfield unserviceable. (German reports) 24 Mar 45: bombed by 74 B-17s. 1 May 45: taken by Canadian troops. Operational Units: Luftdienstverband I (Jul 36 – Dec 43); Luftdienstkdo. I (Jul 36 – Jan 39); Luftdienstkdo. 2 (Oct 37 – Jan 39); Luftdienstkdo. 61 (Jan 39 – Dec 43); Luftdienstkdo. 62 (Jan 39 – Dec 43); 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 106 (Oct-Nov 39); Wekusta 1 Ob.d.L. (Jan 41 – Mar 45); Westa 1 Ob.d.L. (1941-45);Erprobungskdo. 16 (Sep 43 – Jul 44); Stab/KG 30 (Mar-Jun 44); II/KG 30 (Mar-May 44); III./KG 30 (Mar 44); I./KG 30 (Sep 44); Wekusta 10 (Sep 44 – Apr 45); Stab, 4./KG 53 (Oct 44 – Mar 45). School Units: Wetterbeobachtungsschule (1941-44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Gr./JG 52 (Jul – Aug 41); Erg.St./KG 6 (Mar – Jun 42). Station Commands: Fl.H. Bad Zwischenahn (1936 – c.Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. ??/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 15/XI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command): Maj. (Hans?) Kremers ( ? ? ) 9/43. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (S) (1943 – Feb 44); I./Flak-Rgt. 42(Sf) (Jan-Mar 44); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 63(o) (1943 – Sep 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 137(o) (Jan-Aug 44); 5./schw.Flak-Abt. 174(o) (Jan-Mar 44); Stab, 1., 3., 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 185(o) (Feb-Jul 44); Luftsperr-Abt. 206(o) (Oct 43 – Mar 44); 6./schw.Flak-Abt. 224(o) (Feb-Jul 44); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 225(o) (FebJul 44); 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 231(o) (Jun-Jul 44); 5./schw.Flak-Abt. 307(o) (Jan-Jul 44); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 326(o) (Jan-Jul 44); 7./schw.Flak-Abt. 393(o) (Jan-Mar 44); 3., 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 396(o) (Feb-Jul 44); 6./schw.Flak-Abt. 456(o) (Jan-Aug 44); 2./schw.FlakAbt. 461 (Feb-Jul 44); 1., 5./schw.Flak-Abt. 521(o) (Jan-Jun 44); 7./schw.Flak-Abt. 531(o) (1943 – Aug 44); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 539(o) (Jan-Jul 44); 3., 6.gem.Flak-Abt. 601(v) (1943 – Jul 44); 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 634(o) (Jan-Aug 44); 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 635(o) - 38 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (1943 – Aug 44); 5./le.Flak-Abt. 743(o) (Jun-Jul 44); 3., 4., 5./le.Flak-Abt. 762(o) (Feb-Sep 44); 3. and 5./le.Flak-Abt. 770(o) (Feb-Sep 44); 1., 5./le.Flak-Abt. 822 (Eisb.) (Mar-Jun 44); Stab, 1.4./le.Flak-Abt. 859 (Eisb.) (Oct-Nov 43); 1./le.Flak-Abt. 916(o) (Dec 43 – Apr 44); le.Flak-Abt. 942(o) (1943 – Sep 44); [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.579-83 (24 Oct 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bad Zwischenahn/See (GER) (53 12 25N – 08 00 32E) General: operational seaplane station/seaplane base located on the property of the land airfield and on the shore of the Zwischenahner Meer. The station normally accommodated a Staffel of seaplanes, but operations were curtailed during the winter when the lake usually froze over. It relied on the land airfield for its servicing and support needs. It was equipped with the usual slipway/launch ramp facilities and had a small boat harbor. Remarks: 18 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 1 x Ar 196 destroyed. Operational Units: 1. Seenotstaffel (Apr-Aug 39); 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 106 (Oct-Nov 39); Stab/Seenotgruppe d.Lw. (1940); Stab/Kü.Fl.Gr. 506 (Nov-Dec 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Zwischenahn (See) (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 104/XI (See) (Mar-Apr 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 81/XI (Dec 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.579-83 (24 Oct 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Ballenstedt (GER) (51 44 40 N – 11 13 33 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 9 km SSE of Quedlinburg in Anhalt; airfield 3 km N of the town. History: used as a practice field for trainers. Listed as still operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 62 (Quedlinburg) (193940); Arbeitsplatz for Aussenkdo. Quedlinburg/Fluglehrerschule Brandenburg-Briest (Apr 39 – 1945). Station Units: none identified. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Baltringen (GER) S Germany (48 11 20 N - 09 52 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) 26 km SSW of Ulm and 5 km S of Laupheim in Baden-Württemberg; airfield 2 km NNE of the village of Baltringen.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 History: built in the late 1930’s. Used mainly as a practice field by training units during the war. Dimensions: approx. 870 x 915 meters (950 x 1000 yards) and roughly square in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points off the N boundary, off the S boundary and off the W boundary. Ammunition dump was off the SW corner. Infrastructure: there were 2 medium hangars on the S boundary plus a large building off the SE corner that was probably a workshop. A small barracks complex was located off the SE corner along with the station HQ. The control tower was on the S boundary. A number of huts were along the N boundary. Nearest rail connection at Schemmerberg, 3.25 km W of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersals. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: no evidence found of any significant Allied air attacks on this airfield. Operational Units: III./KG 76 (Sep-Oct 39); I./KG 55 (May 40). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 23, FFS A/B 23 then FFS A 23 (Kaufbeuren) (1939-45); 1./JG 106 (Jun 44 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Baltringen (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 8/VII (1940); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 7/VII Laupheim (1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): elements of I./FlakRgt. 501 (Sep 39 – Jun 40). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.72-73 (30 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bamberg (GER) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) 51 km N of Nürnberg in Bavaria and located 2 km SE of Bamberg town center. No information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bamberg (GER) (49 55 15 N – 10 55 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 51 km N of Nürnberg in Bavaria and located 3 km NE of the town center. History: formerly used as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz) and situated on an old military exercise field. No known Luftwaffe use until spring 1945. Surface and Dimensions: rough, uneven meadow land with grass surface measuring approx. 870 x 640 meters (950 x 700 yards). Infrastructure: there was a large building along the SE boundary of the landing area that might have been used as a workshop. A military barracks was 1.6 km to the S and stores buildings were along the W

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 boundary. A branch fail line served the large building on the SE boundary. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 8/VII (1944-45); Fluko Bamberg. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.20 (30 Mar 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Barge (GER): see Marx. Barth (GER) (54 20 45 N – 12 43 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 23 km NW of Stralsund in Mecklenburg and 1.6 km S of the town of Barth. History: construction began in 1935 and Barth was official ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 April 1936. III./KG 152 was the first occupant of Barth followed in 1937 by two Gruppen of LG 1. Barth played an important role in the development of the Luftwaffe in the 1930’s as the Luftwaffe’s tactical development center for supporting infantry and tank warfare, and then in the 1940’s for the formation of new units and the re-equipping and conversion of others, mainly bomber units. The Heinkel firm in Rostock received permission in spring 1942 to use Barth as a production location for aircraft components. From then to the end of the war, thousands of female inmates from Aussenlager Barth of the Ravensbrück concentration camp aa well as other camps toiled away in the converted hangars which had been surrounded with fences. Concurrently, it was also used by target-towing aircraft that served the Flak school at Zingst and for air defense fighter units, including Me 262 jets. Dimensions: approx. 1600 x 1975 meters (1,750 x 1,175 yards) and irregular in shape. S boundary extended in 1943-45. Surface and Runways: grass surface until 1942 when a 1235 meter (1,350 yard) concrete runway was built. Night landing facilities consisted of perimeter and obstruction lighting, flarepath, and a visual Lorenz system aligned on the runway. Infrastructure: refueling points, fuel storage, ammunition storage, communitions were all available. Initially 4 large hangars, then 4 more in 1938. There were numerous workshop buildings, two motor pools, base support facilities, paved hangar aprons, perimeter road and taxiways. Station HQ, barracks, messes, dispensary and officer’s quarters were located off the NE boundary behind the hangars. Dispersal: no organized dispersal areas. Defenses: layout of the Flak positions unknown. Satellites and Decoys:

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Barth-Zipke (GER) (54 20 55 N – 12 48 25 E). Dummy 19.5 km WNW of Stralsund, 5.5 km Se of the town of Barth, 5.5 km ENE of Barth airfield and 1.6 km ENE of the village of Zipke. The mock-up consisted of a supposed landing area packed full sham aircraft. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.964 (1944)] Remarks: 2 May 44: low-level attack – 2 x He 111 H-4 and H-10 from FFS B 17 (See) shot up and damaged on the ground. 4 Aug 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 88s damaged. 30 Apr 45: last combat missions (Fw 190 fighter-bombers) flown from Barth. 2-3 May 45: airfield taken by Soviet forces. Operational Units: III./KG 152 (Jun 36 – Mar 37); III./JG 134 (Mar 37); IV.(Stuka)/LG Greifswald (Jul 37 – Oct 38); II.(s.Jagd)/LG Greifswald (Oct-Nov 38); I.(Z)/LG 1 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); IV.(Stuka)/LG 1 (May 39 – Feb 40); Stab, II./KG 30 (Dec 39 – Apr 40); III./KG 30 (Jan-Apr 40); Stab, 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 106 (Oct 40 – Apr 41); 2./Kü.Fl.Gr. 106 (Nov 40 – Jul 41); 1./Kü.Fl.Gr. 106 (May-Jul 41); Überführungskdo. Luftzeuggruppe 11 (1942); 2./Gruppe Nord (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (May 43 – Apr 45); III./LG 1 (May-Jun 43); II./KG 77 (Aug 43 – Jan 44); Stab, III./SG 1 (Feb-Apr 45); 2./SAGr. 126 (Feb-Apr 45); II./LG 1 (Apr 45); elements of I./KG 66 (Apr 45). School Units: Sturzkampffliegerlehrgang Barth (Nov 38 – Mar 39); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 17 then FFS B 17 (Pütnitz) (Jan 41 – Sep 44); II./Kampffliegerschule 3 (Jun 41 – Sep 42); FFS B 4 (Feb 45); 6./JG 103 (Mar 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.KGr. 5 (Mar 40 – May 41); 12./KG 54 (Apr-May 41); 12./KG 1 (May-Jun 41). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Barth (to c. Jan 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 32/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 5/III Pütnitz (194445). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Maj. Heinrich Seywald (1 Apr 36 ? ); Hptm. Karl-Joachim von Szymonski (Mar 40 - Sep 40); Hptm. Claus Hinkelbein (Sep 40 ? ); Maj. Wilhelm Kühn (Dec 42 ? ). Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the town or nearby on various dates – not complete): 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 30 (Dec 39 - ? ); 7. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 30 (Jan 40 - ? ); Flugh.Betr.Kp. Erg.KGr. 5 (Mar 40 – May 41); Luftgau-Flakartillerieschule XI (Apr 41 – Oct 42); Feld-Flakartillerieschule (Mitte) 11 (1942-45); II./Flak-Rgt. 411 (le. mot.) (Aug 39); le.Flak-Abt. 680(v) (May-Jun 42); II./Flak-Lehr-Rgt. - 42 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (le. mot.) (1939); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 40/III (1943-45)?; Flak-Ers.Abt. 26 (1940); Flak-Ers.Abt. 91 (Dec 40 - 1945); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 55/XI (Sep 42 - ? ); Kriegsgefangenen-Lager 1 d.Lw. (B-Vogelsang, 194245). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.507-11 (30 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bärwalde (GER) (c. 51 25 N – 14 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) (?) in Brandenburg 41 km SSE of Cottbus? Not listed in wartime or postwar airfield directories. Used as a practice field for elementary flight trainers. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 12 then FFS A/B 12 (Königsberg/Neumark) (Nov 39 – Jun 43). Station Units: none identified. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bassenheim (GER) (50 21 35 N – 07 25 10 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 13 km W of Koblenz in Rheinland-Pfalz; strip 3.25 km W of the village of Bassenheim. History: built 1939-40 and used during the May 1940 campaign in the West. Fell into disuse after that and the land reclaimed for cultivation. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 805 x 565 meters (880 x 620 yards). There were open aircraft shelters around the perimeter but no buildings. Operational Units: part of I./JG 2 (Apr-May 40). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.628 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Baumholder (GER) (49 39 00 N – 07 18 00 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) 36 km NW of Kaiserslautern in Rheinland-Pfalz. History: troop maneuver area located there. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bausendorf (GER) (c. 50 01 08 N – 06 59 43 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 9 km ENE of Wittlich and 20 km SW of Cochem/Mosel in Rheinland-Pfalz. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Bautzen-Briesing (GER) (c. 51 14 N – 14 28 E) General: dispersal field (Ausweichflugplatz) for Bautzen-Litten and located 7 km NNE of Bautzen. Listed as still operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Station Units (on various dates): le.II/Feldwerftverband 20 (Feb 45). [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bautzen-Litten (GER) (51 11 35 N – 14 30 45 E) General: operational airfield 57 km ENE of Dresden in Saxony; airfield 5.5 km ENE of the town of Bautzen. History: listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in 1939. Upgraded to an Einsatzhafen in 1942. This airfield was used very little until late 1944/early 1945. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 640 meters (1100 x 700 yards) and rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: a refueling point was in front of the hangar and the station ammunition dump was probably off the NW corner. Infrastructure: there was 1 very large hangar off the SW corner and a building behind it that was probably for stores. A small complex of station buildings was adjacent to the hangar and several of the buildings may have been barracks. The nearest rail connection was in Bautzen. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Aircraft were forced to park just off the SW boundary since the surrounding area was relatively treeless and provided little in the way of natural cover. Defenses: no information on Flak positions. Remarks: 17 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Bf 109, 1 x Fw 190, 1 x Me 410, 4 x Fi 156s and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109 and 1 x Me 410 damaged. Operational Units: Transportfliegergruppe 10 (Ital.) (Oct 44); NAGr. 15 (Feb-Mar 45); 3./NSGr. 4 (Feb-Apr 45); Nahaufkl.St. 12./13 (Mar 45); Pz.Aufkl.Schwarm 4 (Mar-Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 1 (Görlitz). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stab III./Erg.JG 1 (Feb – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 3/IV (1941); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 214/XI (c.Nov 44 – Apr 45)? Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/gem.Flak-Abt. 702 (c. Nov 44 - Mar 45); I./Flak-Rgt. 61 (gem. mot.) (1945); le.FlakAbt. 96(v) (Mar-Apr 45); elements of schw.Flak-Abt. 383 (Mar-Apr 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.512 (21 Jan 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bautzen-Stiebitz (GER) (51 10 30 N – 14 23 36 E) General: satellite field (Ausweichflugplatz) for Bautzen-Litten in Saxony and located 3 km W of the city of Bautzen and 9 km WSW of Bautzen-Litten airfield. History: listed as operational in Feb 45 but no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: no information. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bayreuth-Bindlach (GER) (49 59 25 N – 11.38 25 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 66 km NE of Nürnberg in Bavaria; airfield 6.5 km NE of Bayreuth adjacent to the town of Bindlach and 2 km E of the Berlin-Munich Autobahn. History: ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. In 1939 listed as an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen). Wartime use as a practice field for flight training schools and then from 1944 as a refit and conversion center for tactical reconnaissance units. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1145 meters (1100 x 1250 yards) and roughly triangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No praved runway. Equipped for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: probable refueling points on the N boundary in front of the hangars. Infrastructure: had 2 very large hangars, 1 large repair hangar and 3 large hangars on the N boundary, all with paved hangar aprons. Separate workshops were behind the repair hangar and the motor pool and garages were behind the hangar off the NW corner. Two separate barrack and accommodation areas were located N of the hangars and to the NW of the hangars. Nearest rail connection was at Bindlach railway station, 2 km WSW of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersals. Aircraft were parked in front of the hangars and off the W boundary. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: marshaling yards and munitions dumps were bombed in and around Bayreuth but the airfield was not targeted by heavy bombers. 12 Sep 44: low-level attack – 3 x He 111 P-5s from FFS A 7 shot up and destroyed and 2 more damaged on the ground. 20 Feb 45: low-level attack – 1 x Fw 190 A-8 from I./SG 151 shot up and damaged on the ground. 14 Apr 45: Bayreuth taken by U.S. forces.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: Stab, 1., 2./NAGr. 14 (Dec 43 – Apr 44); Stab/NAGr. 9 (Apr 44); 3./NAGr. 14 (Jun 44); Stab, 1., 2./NAGr. 6 (Jun-Sep 44); Nahaufkl.Gr. 3/21 (Jun-Jul 44); Nahaufkl.St. 12/12 (JulAug 44); Stab/NAGr. 1 (Aug 44 – Feb 45); Nahaufkl.St. 12./12 (Aug 44); 3./NAGr. 2 (Nov-Dec 44); Nahaufkl.St. 7/32 (Nov 44); 2./NAGr. 3 (Nov 44 – Jan 45). School Units: Fliegertechnische Schule 6 (1940 – Apr 45); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 13 later FFS A/B 13 (Pilsen) (1939-43); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 1 then FFS B 1 (1943-44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A 7 (Schweinfurt) (1944-45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stab, III./SG 151 (Jan – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Bayreuth-Bindlach (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 8/XIII (Nov 42 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 14/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 30/VII (Jun 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Obstlt. Otto Mau ( ? ? ) 6/41; Oberst Rudolf Stockert (27 Mar 42 - Nov 42). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): General der Fliegerausbildung (Mar-Apr 45); Koflug Bayreuth (Jul 39 – c.Jun 40); 2./le.Flak-Abt. 951 (Apr-Aug 44); 8.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 13 (1939 – spring 43); 13.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 12 (c.194345); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 12/XVII (Nov 40); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Bayreuth; Lw.-Lazarett 6/XII ( ? – 1945); Sanitäts-Ers.Kp. 13 (1940 - ? ). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.74-77 (30 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bayreuth-Laineck (GER) (49 58 10 N – 11 37 10 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Bavaria (Bayern) 4 km NE of Bayreuth and 1.2 km NW of the village of Laineck. History: no activity was noted here during the war years. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 730 x 730 meters (800 x 800 yards). Infrastructure: had a single hangar on the W boundary and an admin building in the SE corner. Remarks: none. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.430 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bechhofen (GER) (49 10 10 N – 10 35 40 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 13 km S of Ansbach in Bavaria and 3.25 km ENE of the village of Bechhofen. History: 1944 under construction as an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) for fighters. April 1945 in operation. Dimensions: approx. 1325 x 825 meters (1450 x 900 yards). Infrastructure: possibly had a few workshops on - 46 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 the S boundary. Another 10 buildings on the S boundary were believed to have been used as barracks. Nearest rail connection in Bechhofen. Dispersal: taxi tracks connected the landing area to a woods off the W boundary. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.6 (30 Apr 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Beerendorf (GER): see Delitzsch. Beilngries (GER): see Paulushofen. Bemerode (GER): see Hannover-Bemerode. Benneckenstein-Oberharz (GER) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Thuringia 18 km NNW of Nordhausen. History: 1928 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bergen (GER) (49 32 01 N – 06 41 41 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) 12 km NNE of Merzig in Saarland. Exact location in relation to the town of Bergen is not known, but probably just E of it. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bergheim (GER) (c. 48 18 57 N – 10 47 41 E) General: satellite or dispersal airstrip for Lechfeld airfield and located 7 km SW of Augsburg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Remarks: Feb 45: listed as still operational. Operational Units: none identified. Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 9./Erg.JG 2 (Nov 44). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/VII Lechfeld (1944-45). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bergstein (GER) (50 41 32 N – 06 24 57 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in in North Rhine – Westphalia 13 km SSW of Düren in the Hürtgenwald and about 1 km W of the village of Bergen. History: no information, but believed to have been available for the May 1940 attack into Belgium and the Netherlands and not used after that. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Berlin (GER) (52 30 N – 13 22 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates – specific airfield, if any, not identified): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): RLM/Ob.d.L.; Luftkreiskdo. II; Luftgaukdo. Berlin/Luftgaukdo. 4; Stab/Luftgaukdo. III; Lw.-Gruppenkdo. 1; Luftflottenkdo. 1; Luftflottenkdo. Reich (BWannsee); Stab/1. Flieger-Div.; Höh.Kdr.d.Flieger-tech.Schulen. Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: Stab/Höherer Flak-Kdr. 2; Gen.Kdo. I. Flakkorps; LV-Kdo. 1; Stab/Flak-Brig. II; Stab/1. Flak-Div.; Stab/5. Flak-Brig.; Stab/30. Flak-Div. Stab/Flak-Rgt.: 12 (B-Lankwitz as Flakgruppe Berlin-Südost or Süd, Oct 37/Sep 39 – Mar 40). 22 (B-Lankwitz as Flakgruppe Berlin-Süd, 1940-45). 32 (B-Heiligensee, Aug-Oct 39). 42 (B-Lankwitz, c.Apr 41). 52 (B-Heiligensee as Flakgruppe Berlin-Nordwest then BerlinNord, Sep 39 – Oct 40). 53 (B-Heiligensee as Flak-Gruppe Berlin-Nord, 1940/41 1945). 72 (as Eisenbahn-Flakgruppe Berlin, 1942/43 – Jun 44). sw.82 (B-Reinickendorf as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Berlin, Jul 41 – 1945). 100 (as Flakgruppe Berlin-Südost, Oct 39 – Mar 40)? 101 (Berlin, 1939-40). 103 (Berlin, Oct 39). 126 (in B-Reinickendorf as Flakgruppe Berlin-West, 1942/43 – Jun 44, then as Flakgruppe Berlin-Ost? and finally in BHumboldthain as Flakgruppe Berlin-Nord). 132 (B-Heiligensee, Oct 39). 172 (as Flakgruppe Berlin-Ost, Feb 43 – Aug 44). Rgt. General Göring (B-Reinickendorf, Sep 39). Flak-Abt.: I., II., III./Flak-Rgt. 12; I./Flak-Rgt. 21; I./Flak-Rgt. 32; I./Flak-Rgt. 42; s.121; gem.122; gem.123 (T); gem.124; gem.125; gem.127; s.154; s.126; gem.155; s.173; s.182; - 48 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 s.192; s.211; s.221; s.222; s.223; s.224; s.244; s.307; s.Res.321 (Eisb.); s.322; s.323; s.324; s.325; s.326; s.362; s.416 (Eisb.); s.422; s.437; s.473 (Eisb.); I./Flak-Rgt. 501; s.512; s.513; s.514; s.516; gem.517; s.523; s.525 (Eisb.); s.563; s.564; s.605; s.662; le.722; le.733; le.824; le.855; le.859 (Eisb.); le.917; le.979. Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 128; 129; 130; 139; 148; 239; 339; 370; 448; 528; 808. Luftsperr-Abt.: 101; 102; 103; 104; 105; 108; 109; 110. Alarm-Flak: maximum of 21 batteries in 1944. Heimat-Flak: Stab 1/III; Stab 2/III; Stab 4/III; Stab 6/III? with a maximum of 35 batteries in 1944. z.b.V. Batterien: maximum of 32 batteries in 1944. Other Flak: Kdr. d.Flakinstandsetzung 101/III (B-Karlshorst); Flak-Waffenwerkstatt (o) 2/III (B-Lankwitz); FlakWaffenwerkstatt (o) 4/III (B-Heiligensee); Flak-Sammelu.Instandsetzungsstelle für Funkmessgerät 1/III (B-Saalow). Flak-Trsp.Battr.: 24/III, 122/IV and 126/IV in 1944. Flak-Ers./Flak-Ausb.: Flakartillerieschule III (B-Heiligensee); Flak-Ers.Abt. 12 (B-Lankwitz, Aug 39 – 1945); Flak-Ers.Abt. 29 (B-Heiligensee). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): LS-Rgt. z.b.V. 3; LS-Abt. d.Lw. 13, 18, 34; LS-Lehr-Kp.; Sprengkommando d.Lw. 1/III. Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Ln.-Rgt. 1; Ln.-Rgt. 10; part of Ln.-Rgt. 12; Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 221; V./Ln.-Rgt. Ob.d.L.; I., III./Ln.Ers.-u.Ausb.Rgt. 1; parts of Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 3; LV-Nachr.Abt. 1; Ln.-Abt. 101; Ln.-Abt. 102; Ln.-Abt. 356. Medical Services (Sanitätsdienste): Luftgau-San.Abt. 3; Lw.Lazarett 1/III; Lw.-Lazarett 12/III; Ärztliche Akademie d.Lw.; Luftfahrtmedizinisches Institut des Reichsluftfahrtministeriums; Kommando der Sanitätsausbildungs- und Ersatzeinheiten d.Lw. (BSaalow). Other (sonstige, verschiedene): Druckvorschriftenstelle III; Flugleitungsschule d.Lw.; Lw.-Fachschule Berlin; Reichsanstalt d.Lw. für Luftschutz; Reichswetterdienst Schule; Sportschule der Luftwaffe; Technischeschule für Bauwesens d.Lw.; Gasschutzschule d.Lw. Berlin Kladow. Berlin-Adlershof (GER) (a.k.a. Adlershof, Berlin-Johannistal) (52 26 15 N – 13 31 15 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) 12 km SE of Berlin city center. History: in operation since 1909. Enlarged in 1934. A factory airfield (Industriehafen) in 1936 and during World War II for DVL,

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Henschel and the firm Friedrich und Rudow (aircraft repair and overhaul). Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 1000 meters (1500 x 1100 yards) with roughly an oval shape. Surface and Runways: hardened grass surface on sandy soil. No paved runway. However, in the center of the landing area was a large paved circle surrounded by 4 paved starting platforms. A perimeter road encircled the landing area. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstands along the N, SE and S boundaries while bulk storage wqas off the SW boundary. Infrastructure: there were 8 flight hangars in all with the main groups off the S and W boundaries. Adjacent to the 4 hangars off the S boundary were a number of workshops and a boiler house. On the N boundary were 3 servicing hardstands, 1 more at the SE corner and another on the S boundary. The buildings of the Henschel Aircraft Factory off the N boundary included 2 very large hangars, 1 medium hangar and numerous workshops. The D.V.L. Research Station off the SE corner comprised 2 large hangars, workshops and other buildings. A broad taxiway lead from these hangars to the landing area. The Focke-Wulf Aircraft Factory was located off the NW boundary with at least 1 large assembly hangar and numerous smaller buildings. Station admin buildings and barracks were off the S and SE boundaries. A branch rail line from Berlin served the N end of the airfield. Dispersal: had 10 open aircraft shelters on the NE boundary, 13 netted aircraft shelters on the S boundary and 26 netted aircraft shelters on the W boundary for a total of 49 in mid-May 44. Defenses: airfield protected by the huge Flak girdle that defended the greater Berlin area. Remarks: heavily bombed during Allied raids on Berlin and by May 1944 more than 60% of the factory buildings on the NE, SE and SW sides of the airfield had been destroyed. 26 Feb 45: bombed – 2 x Fw 200s and 5 x Ju 52s damaged; 3 hangars and several barracks slightly damaged. (German reports) Operational Units: Flugbereitschaft d.Generalluftzeugmeisters (GL) (1930s? – 1944); Fliegerforstschutzverband (1939 – 1941); 13./SG 151 (Mar-Apr 45). School Units: Höhere Fliegertechnischeschule (1937-42). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) 83 (26 Aug – Dec 39); Fl.H.Kdtr. Adlershof (1940 - ? ). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Hptm. Hans-Heinrich Brustellin ( ? Nov 39) 9/39; Oberst Friedrich Niehuus (Dec 39 ? ). - 50 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Kraftfahrverfügungs-Abt. GL (Nov 42); Deutschen Versuchsanstalt für Luftfahrtforschung (1930’s – 1945); Institut für Flugmedizin der Deutschen Versuchsanstalt für Luftfahrt (c.1939-45); Lw.-Beute-Auswertungsstelle Berlin-Adlershof; Lw.-Kriegsberichter-Kp. z.b.V. (Aug 42); Ergänzungs-Abt. für Soldaten im Ingenieurdienst d.Lw. (Aug 42); Lehrenprüfstelle d.Lw. (1942-45); VersuchsEinsatzverband für Prop.-Mittel dl.Lw. (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.666-68 (5 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Berlinchen (GER) (53 13 15 N – 12 34 30 E) General: satellite field (Ausweichflugplatz) and parking area (Abstellplatz) 9 km NE of the town of Wittstock in Brandenberg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Berlin-Diepensee (GER): see Berlin-Schönefeld. Berlin-Gatow (GER) (52 28 25 N – 13 07 45 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 16 km WSW of Berlin, 4 km SW of Gatow and 2.5 km NW of Kladow. History: construction began in 1934 and it was inaugurated as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Gatow was an operational airfield as well as a major training base from 1934-45. Dimensions: approx. 1420 x 1000 meters (1550 x 1100 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. A perimeter road ran along the E and S boundaries to the hangar area. A paved servicing hardstand fronted the hangars. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstand in front of the hangars. Infrastructure: Gatow had a total of 11 hangars as follows – 1 very large, 1 large repair type, 3 large, 3 medium and 1 small off the SE boundary, and 2 medium at the SW corner. There was also at least 1 workshop building. The base motor pool and garages were off the SE corner. Two very large barrack complexes were located in a woods behind the main group of hangars and the other in a woods off the NW corner of the airfield. Offices, base flight control and other station services were on the SE boundary. The extensive buildings of the Luftkriegsschule (air cadet college) were located SE of the airfield on both sides of the Kladow-Gatow main road. The airfield was probably served by a branch rail line.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: had a Northwest dispersal, an East dispersal and a Southeast dispersal with a total of 47 open aircraft shelters, bays in woods and parking sites. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: : the airfield and surrounding area were heavily bombed during the war as part of the RAF and USAAF campaign against Berlin. 11 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed a total of 15 aircraft destroyed or damaged at B-Gatow and and B-Staaken. 16 Jul 44: bombed. Operational Units: Flieger-Kp./Ln.-Rgt. 1 (Jul 38 - ? ); GrossraumWekusta (Mar 38 – Jun 39); Wekusta 1Ob.d.L. (Jun 39 – Jun 40); 2. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (May 41); Stab/KG 200 (Feb 44 – Apr 45); I./SG 1 (Apr 45). School Units: Luftkriegsakademie (Nov 35 – Feb 45); Höherer Kdr.d.Luftkriegsschulen (Sep 35 – Apr 43); LKS Berlin-Gatow (Apr 36 – Jan 40); LKS 2 (Jan 40 – Apr 45); Technischen Akademie d.Lw.; Höh.Kdo.d.Luftkriegsschulen (May 43 – Jan 44). Other: “Horthy István” Hungarian AF Academy with elementary flight trainers (Jan 45 - ? ). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: II./Erg.JG 1 (Feb – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Berlin-Gatow ( - to Feb 43?); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 17/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Willich (1 Oct 35 ? ); Oberst Heinz Funke (Feb 40 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): rear echelon of Stab/XI. Fliegerkorps (Aug 43); Stab/Fliegerführer 200 (Mar-Apr 45); Werft-Abt. 8/III (Feb 45)?; Werft-Abt. 16/III (1944-45); 5./le.FlakAbt. 733 (1943-45); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 208/III (1943-45); part of Ln.Rgt. 12 (Oct 35 – Jun 38); Lw.-Bau-Gerätezug 8/III (Oct 39). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.616-19 (19 May 44 updated to 31 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Berlin- Johannisthal (GER): see Berlin-Adlershof. Berlin-Rangsdorf (GER) (52 16 40 N – 13 25 40 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) and seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) 26 km S of Berlin, 2 S of the town of Rangsdorf and along the SE side of a lake of the same name. History: Built in 1935-36 for use by both land and seaplanes in time for the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. Ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Served as a Industriehafen for the Bücker aircraft firm during the war building trainers and parts for fighter aircraft. The Bücker plant was adjacent to the airfield on its NE side. Rangsdorf served as Berlin’s civil airport - 52 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 both before and during the war years and from mid-1943 as a rest and refit station for operational units. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 1280 meters (1200 x 1400 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: hardened grass surface No paved runway. Anchorage: the lake (Rangsdorfer See) provided ample area for takeoffs and landings although it was apt to freeze over during particularly cold weather. A channel was dredged from the shore to deeper water to facilitate the movement of aircraft due to the absence of a launching ramp or slipway or crane. A small jetty was in front of the seaplane station buildings and another was located some 300 meters further north. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were located on the servicing hardstand on the N boundary. A small ammunition dump was at the SE corner of the landing area. Infrastructure: had a total of 8 hangars - 1 very large, 3 large, 2 medium and 1 long rectangular on the N boundary, and 1 small on the S boundary. Most of the hangars had paved aprons. The buildings of the Bücker factory, which consisted of 1 large assembly hangar and numerous workshops, were off the NE corner. A barracks complex was off the N boundary behind the hangars, the flight control building was probably at the W end of the N boundary and a large building at the NW corner was believed to be used as a mess. There were 3 or 4 huts on the W boundary that may have been used as additional accommodations. The seaplane station buildings faced the lakeshore and consisted of a clubhouse and a few huts. The Berlin-Zossen rail line passed close to the E boundary of the airfield. Dispersal: there were no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: had 4 light Flak positions around the airfield in 1943, including 2 Flak towers at the NE corner. Remarks: : the airfield and surrounding area were heavily bombed during the war as part of the RAF and USAAF campaign against Berlin. 11 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 3 x Ju 86s, 2 x Ju 290s, 1 x Fw 200, 2 x Ju 88s, 2 x He 111s, 1 Ar 196, 1 x Caudron and 3 x unidentified aircraft destroyed or damaged. 21 Jun 44: bombed by 16 B-24 Liberators. Apr 45: taken by Soviet troops in late April. Operational Units: Wetterflugstelle Berlin-Rangsdorf (c. 1939-45); Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 1/1 (May 39 – 1941/42); Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 1/3 (May 39 – 1941/42); Aufkl.St./Gen.d.Lw. beim OKH (Aug-Oct 39); part of Kurierstaffel OKH (Aug 39 – Apr 45); Luftverkehrsgruppe Rangsdorf (Jun 41 – Oct 44); Versuchsverband des Ob.d.L. (Feb 43 – Apr 45?); Stab/Fl.Verb.Geschw. 2 (Oct 43 - ? )?; NSGr. 8 (Apr 45). - 53 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: practice field (Arbeitsplatz) for FFS A 61 (Werder/Havel) (1944-45); Lehrgang für Fliegerhorst- und Flughafenbereichs-Kommandanten (1944-45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stab/SG 151 (Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Rangsdorf (1939); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 93/III (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 12/III (1942-44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 18/III Berlin-Staaken (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Rudolf von Katte (Jan 41 - May 41). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): General d.Kampfflieger (L.In. 2) (c.Oct 43 – Mar 45); General d.Schlachtflieger (L.In. 3) (1944 – Apr 45); Auffanglager d.Lw. Ost (Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.821-23 (14 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Berlin-Schönefeld (GER) (52 22 45 N – 13 31 30 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) 18 km SE of Berlin city center and immediately SE of the suburb of Schönefeld. History: Schönefeld was an Industriehafen built 1935-36 for the Henschel firm. Its main activity during the was was the assembly of Ju 88 bombers along with some experimental work. Askania and Telefunken manufactured and installed airborne radar sets, primarily the Lichtenstein apparatus. Used by operational units during the battle for Berlin in 1945. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 1280 meters (1400 x 1400 yards) and roughly square in shape. Surface and Runways: firm and well-drained grass surface that sloped slightly downward toward the SE. Had three concrete runways intersecting in the form of a triangle that measured approx. 960 meters (1050 yards) aligned NE/SW, 825 meters (900 yards) E/W, and 825 meters (900 yards) NW/SE. A perimeter road ran along the N boundary and a taxiway connected the S end of the NW/SE runway to the buildings on the S boundary. All 3 runways were equipped with permanent lighting. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the N boundary but most aircraft were refueled from bowsers (fuel trucks). Infrastructure: the Henschel factory buildings were off the N side of the airfield and consisted of 1 flight hangar, 2 assembly/storage hangars, a very large component erecting and assembly shop, an experimental assembly shop, 2 large machine shops along with various other buildings, including workshops and offices. The hangars had paved hangar aprons. On the S side of the field were 3 medium hangars and some workshops that were used by the Askania and Telefunken firms. The motor pool and garages were off the NW side - 54 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 of the field. The civilian workers, mainly Russian and French, were billeted in barracks N and NW of the Henschel plant. Station HQ, admin offices and stores buildings were off the NW side, and the flight control building was on the N boundary. More offices, messes, canteens, etc., were among the buildings at the S end. A branch rail line served the airfield on the N, E and S sides. Dispersal: there were two dispersals – Northeast and South with a total of 9 large open aircraft shelters and 6 small open aircraft shelters. An additional 7 large open shelters were under construction in Mar 45. Defenses: protected by the thick Flak belt around Berlin. Remarks: the airfield and surrounding area were heavily bombed during the war as part of the RAF and USAAF campaign against Berlin. Operational Units: I./JG 4 (Feb-Mar 45); Stab, 1., 3./SG 9 (Feb-Mar 45); II.(Sturm)/JG 4 (Feb-Apr 45). Station Commands: none. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 1./le.Flak-Abt. 979 (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.472-73 (25 Mar 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Berlin-Schönwalde (GER) (a.k.a. Schönwalde). (52 37 00 N – 13 09 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 22.5 km NW of Berlin and 1.6 km NE of the town of Schönwalde and immediately E of Schönwalde-Glien. History: land purchased and surveyed in 1934 and construction began in 1935. Luftwaffe admin personnel arrived on 1 July 1935 and the airfield opened for flight operations on 29 Sep 35 with elementary flight training beginning a short time later. Officially established 1 January 1936 under Koflug 4 (Berlin-Staaken). The 2nd construction phase began in 1938 with the addition of many buildings. Schöwalde spent 1935-45 as a training base and as a location for experimental work. Dimensions: approx. 1235 x 915 meters (1350 x 1000 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Had a 1000 meter concrete runway aligned NE/SW that was built in late 1942 in addition to the prepared grass strip used earlier. A concrete assembly platform was at the S end of the runway and a concrete servicing hardstand was on the N boundary. Equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: there were 5 refueling points on servicing hardstand on the N boundary in front of the flight operations building and a munitions dump off the S boundary. Infrastructure: had 5 large hangars and a very large repair hangar, all with paved aprons, numerous workshops, motor pool and garage, - 55 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 station HQ, flight operations and control tower building, firehouse, classroom buildings, messes, clubs, sports ground, officer housing estate, at least 24 barrack buildings (some interconnected), a foreign worker camp with 19 wooden barrack huts, a rifle range, a compass swing, numerous stores buildings and other installations. A branch rail line served the W, N and E boundaries. Dispersal: there were 2 dispersals – North-Northeast (in woods) and Northwest (in woods) – with a total of 24 large open aircraft shelters and 8 aircraft parking bays. Defenses: Flak positions off the S boundary. Satellites and Decoys: Schönwalde-Pausin (GER) (52 37 00 N – 13 03 10 E). Dummy 11.25 km E of Nauen, 10.5 km NNW of Döberitz airfield, 7.25 km W of Schönwalde airfield and 2.5 km S of the village of Pausin. Mock-up used a clever arrangement of lighting to create the night time illusion of an airfield. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.966 (1944)] Remarks: : the airfield and surrounding area were heavily bombed during the war as part of the RAF and USAAF campaign against Berlin. 26 Feb 45: bombed – runway cratered. (German reports) Late Mar 45: strafed by P-51 Mustangs – 1 x Fw 200 and 1 x Ju 52 belonging to Fliegerstaffel des Führers destroyed on the ground. 10 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Ju 52 destroyed and 2 more damaged. 22 Apr 45: airfield rendered unserviceable by demolitions and is abandoned except for a few Volkssturm defenders. 24 Apr 45: captured by Soviet forces after very little resistance. Operational Units: III./JG 52 (Sep-Nov 40); Verbindungsstaffel 1 (Apr-May 42); I./TG 4 (May-Jun 43); I./JG 77 (Oct-Dec 44); Fliegerzielstaffel 6 (Oct/Nov 44); Grossraumtransportstaffel Ju 352/Fw 200 (Jan-Apr 45); Fliegerstaffel des Führers (Jan-Apr 45). School Units: Fliegerbildschule Schönwalde (1936-43); elementary flight school Schönwalde (Jan 36 – Mar 39); Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 11 (1939-42) and Schule/FAR 11 (Apr 39 – Oct 41); FFS A/B 11 (Oct 41 – Aug 43); Kriegsoffizier-Schule (1940-43); Flugleitungsschule d.Lw. (mid-1942 - ?); Lehrgang für Technische Offiziere ( ? – 1945). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Flieger-Ers.Abt. 42 (Oct 36 – Mar 37); Flieger-Ers.Abt. 12 (Apr 37 – Oct 38); Flieger-Ers.Abt. 11 (Nov 38 – Mar 39); KGr. z.b.V. 300 (Mar – May 43); Erg.Transportgruppe (later I./Erg.Transportgeschwader) (May 43 – Oct 44); part of II./Erg.Transportgeschwader (Jun-Dec 43, Jun-Jul 44); Stab/Erg.Transportgeschwader (Oct 43 – Jul 44); II./Erg.Transportstaffel (Oct 44 – Mar 45); 1. and 8./Erg.JG 1 (Jan – Feb 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: as Fl.H. Schönwalde (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 41/III (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 27/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Jens-Peter Petersen (1 Jan 36 - 30 Jun 38);Oberst Nikolaus, Graf von Luckner (1 Jul 38 - 4 Aug 40);Oberst Robert Pistorius (5 Aug 40 - 25 Sep 42). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 36/III (1944-45); elements of schw.Flak-Abt. 437 (Feb 42 – 1945); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 133/XII (Mar 45)?; Personalleitstelle/XIV. Fliegerkorps (c.May 43 – Aug 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258A pp.871-73 (17 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; Bukowski/Trilus; web site fliegerhorste.de] Berlin-Staaken (GER) (52 32 10 N – 13 07 45 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 16 km WNW of Berlin, 6 km WSW of Spandau and immediately NW of Staaken. History: dates from July 1915 when it was built as an airship construction facility. After World War I, it served as an airport and as a Lufthansa pilot training and aircraft repair facility. The Luftwaffe became a joint occupant in the mid-1930’s and a Fliegerhorstkommandantur was established there by fall 1935. Factory airfield (Industriehafen) for DLH (workshops) during the war and from the end of 1942 hosted a major aircraft rebuilding operation run by Weser Flugzeugbau. Staaken was also home to many courier and liaison units and a transit hub for transport aircraft. Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 940 meters (1500 x 1030 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Two intersecting concrete runways in the form of an X, one 1235 meters (1350 yards) aligned WNW/ESE, and the other 1100 meters (1200 yards) aligned NE/SW. Equipped with perimeter lighting, runway illumination and a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the N boundary and in front of the long hangars off the SE corner. Infrastructure: there were a total of 9 hangars – (a) 1 very large, 2 large rectangular, 1 large curved roof and 1 small curved roof off the NE boundary; (b) 2 very long narrow and 2 small rectangular on the SE boundary. Separate workshops were behind the hangars on the NE side, and engine test beds off the NE corner. The main airfield buildings that included extensive barracks and office buildings, were built around a recessed bay off the E boundary. A further group of barracks was off the NE boundary and a large building that was probably used for storage was off the E boundary. A light rail branch line served the hangars and main airfield buildings. - 57 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: there were no organized dispersal facilities in Dec 43. Defenses: there were 9 heavy Flak positions and 6 light Flak positions within 4 to 5 km of the airfield in Dec 43. Remarks: : the airfield and surrounding area were heavily bombed during the war as part of the RAF and USAAF campaign against Berlin. 10 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 200 destroyed, plus 1 x Do 217 and 1 x He 111 damaged. Operational Units: Fliegerstaffel z.b.V. (Jan 35 – 1937/38); Flugbereitschaft RLM (1930s – mid-41); Führer-Kurierstaffel (Aug 39 – Jun 41); Kurierstaffel OKW (Aug 39 – 1941); Kurierstaffel Ob.d.L. (Aug 39 – Apr 45); Verbindungsstaffel Ob.d.L. (Aug 39 - ? ); Kurierstaffel Ob.d.M. (Aug 39 – 1941?); 2.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Oct 39); 2. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (Feb-Dec 40); part of KGr. z.b.V. 107 (Apr-May 40); Flugbereitschaft Berlin-Staaken (Aug 40); Luftverkehrsstaffel Staaken (mid-41 – 1945); KGr.z.b.V. 4 (Feb 42); KGr. z.b.V. 102 (Sep-Oct 42)?; KGr.z.b.V. 200 (Jan 43); JG 25 (Jul-Dec 43); Kurierstaffel OKH (1944-45); Verbindungsstaffel 7 (Mar 44 - ? ); I./SG 5 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); III./KG 200 (Jan-Feb 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 14./SG 151 (Jan – Mar 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Kdtr. Berlin-Staaken (to c.6/43); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 18/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Rudolf Trautvetter (1 Jul 38 31 Jul 41); Obstlt. Franz Hey (Aug 41 ? ); Hptm. Horst Engewald (acting?) (22 Feb 42 ? ); Oberst Werner Heine ( ? ? ) 1/43, 6/43. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug 4/III (c.Oct 40 – Apr 45); Werft-Abt. 37/III (1944-45); E-Hafen-AusrüstungsKolonne (mot) 6/III; Erprobungsstelle Staaken (Mar 33 – 1934/35). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.474 and 886-88 (17 Apr 44 updated to Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Berlin-Tegel (GER) (52 34 00 N – 13 17 30 E) General: an airdrome7 km NW of Berlin that was initially for airships from 1906 and then for reconnaissance aircraft to the end of World War I. It was later used as a rocket test ground during the 1930’s to about 1937 and after that as a manoever area for the Flakartillerie. Not known to have been used by aircraft during World War II. After the war, it was completely rebuilt and greatly expanded to become the principal international airport serving Berlin. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 24/III (1943-45)? [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Berlin-Teltow (GER): see Teltow. - 58 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Berlin-Tempelhof (GER) (52 28 30 N – 13 24 30 E) General: civil airport and military airfield (Flughafen and Fliegerhorst) 4 km SSE of Berlin city center between the districts of Schöneberg and Neukoeln. History: earliest aviation history dates from 1909 and and it served as a military field during World War I. Plans were made to transform it into a commercial airport in 1919 and the first hangars and buildings were started in 1923 with basic construction continuing to 1927. Served international passengers with a customs terminal during the pre-war years and additional infrastructure and improvements were added during 1938-39. Its civil aviation services were temporarily transferred to Berlin-Rangsdorf in September 1939 and its hangars used for the manufacturing of radar equipment. Civil airline services returned to Tempelhof in 1940 and remained there to 22 Apr 45. Factory airfield (Industriehafen) for Weser Flugzeugbau from 1941 (Ju 87, Fw 190 and Ta 152 manufacturing). It was one of the principal airfields for setting up transport units during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1920 x 1650 meters (2100 x 1800 yards). Surface and Runways: good grass surface on clay sub-soil. No paved runways but had a generous network of paved taxiways. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, a flare-path and probably a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the 2 large hangars on the E side of the field, and large capacity (c. 500,000 gallons) underground fuel storage tanks were on the E boundary. Infrastructure: the new airport building with accommodations and extensive hangar facilities was at the NW corner along with 4 workshop-type buildings in front of it. A 275 meter (300 yard) wide paved hangar apron ran in front of the new airport building and a 65 meter (70 yard) wide paved strip continued around the W and S sides of the landing area, with two semi-circular bays running in toward the center. Behind the new airport building were several blocks of 4- to 7-storey buildings housing admin offices, restaurants, etc. The old airport buildings on the E side of the airport included a central admin building with 2 long hangars on either side. Just behind these were 2 more large hangars where Ju 87s were probably assembled. In the same area were additional workshops, carpentry shops, several blocks of military barracks, foreign worker accommodations, storage buildings and sheds. A wide, crecent-shaped paved hangar apron fronted the old airport buildings. Special branch rail lines ran along the S and SW boundaries of the field. Dispersal: there was a South (perimeter) dispersal area with 11 large open aircraft shelters.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: the airport/airfield was protected by the immense Flak belt that surrounded Berlin. Remarks: bombed many times as part of the over all RAF and USAAF raids on Berlin. 24 Aug 43: bombed – 1 x W 34 from Flugbereitschaft XI. Fliegerkorps destroyed on the ground. 26 Feb 45: bombed – 1 hangar and 7 barrack and admin buildings destroyed; landing area cratered and airfield unserviceable. (German reports) 18 Mar 45: bombed – 2 x Fw 200s and several Fw 190s destroyed, 4 hangars hit and partially burned out. (German report) 28 Apr 45: airfield taken by Soviet troops. Operational Units: Fliegerstaffel des Führers (F.d.F.) (1933 – Mar 44); Stab, Fliegerstaffel z.b.V. ( ? – Dec 38); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (Jan-Aug 39); Stab/KG z.b.V. 172 (c. Aug-Oct 39); I./KG z.b.V. 172 (Aug 39); II./KG z.b.V. 172 (Aug/Sep 39 – May 40?); III./KG z.b.V. 172 (Aug 39 – Jan/Feb 40); 10.(Sonderstaffel)/KG z.b.V. 172 (AugSep 39); Versuchsstelle für Höhenflüge (VfH) (Aug-Nov 39); 4. (F)/4./Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (Oct 39 – 1940)?; KGr. z.b.V. 107 (Mar-Apr 40); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (Sep-Nov 40); Luftverkehrsstaffel Tempelhof (Jun 41 – 1944); Fliegergruppe z.b.V. 7 (Jul 42 – 1942); Lufttransportstaffel 290 (Jan-Mar 43); Gruppe Mitte (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (May 43 – 1945). School Units: Reichwetterdienstschule; Höh.Kdr.d.Blindflugschulen (1939-45); Flugleitungsschule d.Lw. (Jan 43 – Sep 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Tempelhof renamed Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) 103/III in fall 1939; as Fl.H. Tempelhof (to 1943); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 17/III Berlin-Gatow (1944); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 18/III Berlin-Staaken (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/XI. Fliegerkorps (Jan-May 41, Aug 41 - 1942); Stab/Fliegerführer XI. Fliegerkorps (Jan 41 – c.Mar 44); Transportfliegerführer 2 (Jun 43); General d.Fliegerbodenorganisation und des Flugbetriebes (c.194345); 1./le.Flak-Abt. 979 (1943-45); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 513 (Feb 43 – Apr 44); 5./Flugsicherungs-Rgt. Reich (1944-45); Ln.Flugsicherungshauptstelle 5 (1944-45); Wetterbezirkszentrale Tempelhof. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.513-17 (9 May 44) and pp.466-68 (14 Jan 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bermaringen (GER) (48 28 N – 09 49 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Baden-Württemburg 14 km NW of Ulm. History: no record of Luftwaffe use after mid-

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 1940. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Bermaringen (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 17/VII (1940). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.452 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bernburg (GER) (51 50 00 N – 11 42 00 E) General: airfield and factory airfield (Fliegerhorst and Industriehafen) 36 km S of Magdeburg in Anhalt and 34 km W of Dessau; airfield located 3.25 km NW of Bernburg. History: construction began in 1936 and it was ordered inaugurated as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. The Junkers plant at the N end of the field was built in 1937. A major fighter unit formation and training base before the war, the Luftwaffe station buildings at the S end were eventually taken over by Junkers in 194041 as the plant expanded. The firm ATG was also located there. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1050 meters (1100 x 1150 yards) and almost square in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface with a layer of broken bricks and cinders. Had three paved runways in the form of a triangle: (1) 1190 meters (1300 yards) aligned E/W; (2) 1145 meters (1250 yards) aligned NE/SW; and, (3) 825 meters (900 yards) aligned NNW/SSE. Taxi tracks lead down the E side of the landing area to the hangars. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were near the NW corner and underground fuel storage was located among the buildings off the S boundary. Infrastructure: off the N boundary were 3 large assembly hangars fronted by paved hangar aprons along with several smaller factory buildings and a motor pool with garages. The factory offices, canteens, stores, etc., were scattered among these hangars and buildings. Off the S boundary were 1 large repair hangar, 6 medium hangars, station admin offices, barracks, messes, stores, fire station together with another motor pool and garage area. The flight control was adjacent to the fire station. Factory workers were also billeted in the village of Höhendorf, 2 km to the north. A branch rail line served the hangars on the N boundary, then ran along the E boundary and terminated at a loading and unloading bay on the SE corner. Dispersal: there were 3, North, East and South, with a total of 38 open aircraft shelters, 11 covered plus 30 aircraft parking hardstands. Defenses: no information on the layout of Flak positions. Satellites and Decoys: Bernburg-Brumby (GER) (51 52 40 N – 11 43 40E). Located 9 km N of Bernburg, 5.25 km NNE of Bernburg airfield and 2 km SSE - 61 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 of the town of Brumby. Served as a decoy for the Junkers factory airfield at Bernburg. The mock-up had 3 phony runways in the form of a triangle and possibly a lighting system. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.964 (1944)] Remarks: 20 Feb 44: airfield bombed by 37 B-17 Fortresses. 22 Feb 44: airfield bombed by 47 B-17s. 11 Apr 44: airfield bombed by 99 B-24 Liberators. 29 Jun 44: Allied intelligence noted from sources that aircraft were parked outside the hangars at the N end to have equipment installed and then moved to the E boundary to await testing. After acceptance, they were parked at the SW end of the airfield. 7 Jul 44: airfield bombed by 90 B-24s. May 45 photos: http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/fotostrecke54868-12.html , http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/fotostrecke54868-30.html . Operational Units: I./JG 232 (Apr 36 – Apr 37); I./JG 137 (Apr 37 – Oct 38); Stab, I./JG 231 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); I./ZG 2 (May-Aug 39); Stab/JG 3 (May-Aug 39); Überführungsstelle d.Lw. Bernburg (194243); 5./Gruppe Mitte (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (May 43 – 1944/45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Jagdstaffel 1 (Nov – Dec 39). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Bernburg (to Feb 43); Fl.H.Kdtr. E z.b.V. Bernburg (c. Feb – Apr 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 7/IV z.b.V. (c. Apr 40 – c. Feb 41); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/III Köthen (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 1./le.Flak-Abt. 727 (Apr 43 – Apr 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.518-20 (10 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Berndorf (GER): often appears in Allied documents as a misspelling of Bondorf in reference to Hailfingen airfield - see there. Berneuchen (GER) (a.k.a. Barnówko) (52 47 N – 14 46 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz)? Hamlet located in West Pomerania/Kreis Landsberg and 8 km NE of Dębno. No information found of any Luftwaffe activity at this location. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Besendorf (GER) (c. 53 31 N – 11 17 E) General: practice field (Arbeitsplatz) in Mecklenburg 14 km SSW of Schwerin near the hamlet of Besendorf. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 22 (Neustadt-Glewe) (1939-40); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 42 (Neustadt-Glewe) (1941-42). Station Units: none identified. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Beskiden (e. Beskids) - mountains along Polish-Czech border S of Kraków. Bessenheim (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Niedermendig airfield - see there. Biberach (GER) (a.k.a. Biberach an der Riss/Baden-Württemberg) (48 06 40 N – 09 45 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 37 km SSW of Ulm; airfield located 3 km WNW of the town. History: pre-war landing ground before being taken over by the Luftwaffe in the late 1930’s. No known use by the Luftwaffe until 1945. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 825 x 825 meters (900 x 900 yards). Remarks: 9 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 190 and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109, 1 x Fw 190, 1 x Me 410 and 5 x unidentified aircraft damaged. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.452 (23 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Biblis (GER) (49 41 15 N – 08 30 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hessen located 11 km NE of Worms and 21 km N of Mannheim; airfield 3 km E of the town of Biblis. History: built in 1936 with the hangars and buildings designed to look like part of a large farming estate. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1370 x 1000 meters (1500 x 1100 yards) and roughly rectangular. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, flare path, beam approach system and a visual Lorenz system for night operations. Infrastructure: 1 large and 2 small hangars that were well camouflaged in woods off the E boundary. A small barracks camp and numerous scattered huts in woods off the N boundary provided accommodations. Stores buildings were in a woods adjacent to the hangars. A branch rail line served the landing area on the N side. Dispersal: head a East and North dispersal with a total of 2 open aircraft shelters and 26 aircraft parking hardstands. Some paved taxiways also existed, especially off the E boundary. Remarks:

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Sep 44: repeatedly attacked at the end of September and during the first two weeks of October, but not again until 24 December. 24 Dec 44: bombed by 100 B-17 Fortresses and strafed by escort fighters – heavy damage and airfield rendered unserviceable; 4 x Fw 190s from I./JG 11 destroyed (1) and damaged (3) on the ground. 5 Jan 45: bombed – 2 x Fw 190As from I./JG 11 destroyed (1) or damaged (1) on the ground. 26 Mar 45: airfield taken by U.S. forces without a fight. Operational Units: I./ZG 52 (Sep-Oct 39); Stab, III./KG 2 (May-Jun 40); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 33 (Apr-May 41); San.Flugbereitschaft z.b.V. (1944 – Oct 44); II./JG 53 (May 44); part of III./JG 300 (Oct 44); III./JG 4 (Nov-Dec 44); Sonderkdo. Götz (Nov 44 – Feb 45); Stab, I./JG 11 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 100 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); Sonderkdo. Sommer (Feb 45). School Units: Stab and I./SG 103 (May – Oct 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Biblis (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 26/XII (Mar 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 3/XII (Jan 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Biblis of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/XII Mannheim-Sandhofen (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. Biblis of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 24/VII MannheimSandhofen (Jun-Sep 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 220/XII (Sep 44 – Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werftkdo. (o) 130/XII (1 Jan 45); Werkstattwagenzug (Fl) 7/XIV (1 Jan 45); 8./gem.Flak-Abt. 491 (Sep 44); Flugh.Betr.Kp. Biblis. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.80-82 (30 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bielefeld (GER) (c. 52 00 18 N – 08 27 56 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 6 km SW of Bielefeld city center in Nordrhein-Westfalen. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: sand with grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bielefeld-Windelsbleiche (GER) (51 58 00 N – 08 32 50 E) General: airfield 6.5 km SSE of Bielefeld city center in NordrheinWestfalen and 1.6 km NE of Windelsbleiche. History: used by gliders 1941-42. Surface and Dimensions: good grass surface measuring approx. 777 x 640 meters (850 x 700 yards). Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Stab/2. Flak-Brig. (B-Brackwede, Feb-Mar 45); schw.Flak-Abt. 405(o) (1939); schw.Flak-Abt. 406(o) (Jun 41); schw.Flak-Abt. 625(o) (as Flakuntergruppe Bielefeld) (Oct 43 – Jun - 64 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 44); VI.(Eisb.Kabel-Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. Ob.d.L. (Oct 40 - ); Ln.-Abt. 162 (BBrackwede, Feb-Mar 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.584-638 (29 Oct 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bielitzfelde (GER) (50 33 30 N – 17 30 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 30 km SW of Oppeln (Opole) in Silesia and 15.5 km NE of Neisse (Nysa). History: no information on wartime activity and may have been unused throughout the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: no information. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.955 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bindersleben (GER): see Erfurt-Bindersleben. Bindlach (GER): see Bayreuth-Bindlach. Bissel (GER) (a.k.a. Grossenkneten-Sage) (52 56 45 N – 08 08 45 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) 22.4 km S of Oldenburg in Lower Saxony, 12.8 km NNE of Cloppenburg and 1.6 km SW of Bissel. History: construction began in 1937 with its limited infrastructure designed as farm buildings for camouflage purposes. Aside from the month of April 1940, Bissel had very little use until December 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 1145 meters (1,400 x 1,250 yards). Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications and other amenities available when needed. A cluster of 7 small workshop buildings and huts were on the N boundary. The munitions dump was in woods off the SW corner. A barracks and administrative camp of some 21 buildings in a woods 1,400 meters N of the field. Nearest rail connection at Grossenkneten 6.4 km from the field. Dispersal: there were an unknown number of aircraft bays cut into a woods off the S boundary. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 1945: demilitarized by the British after the war and returned to agricultural use. Operational Units: III./KG 54 (Apr 40); III./JG 6 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); IV./JG 26 (Mar-Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Bissel (Aug 39 – Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 4/XI (Mar-Apr 40); Flugplatzkdo. Bissel of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 17/XI Vechta (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.40-41 (8 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bitburg-Pützhöhe (GER) (50 01 00 N – 06 32 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 5 km NE of Bitburg in Rheinland-Pfalz. History: operational by Dec 39. Used as a forward launch point for single-engine reconnaissance and special operations aircraft for the first few days of the attack on France and the Low Countries, 10 May 40. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: unknown. Air Units: Aufkl.Gr. (H) 156 (5/40); 2.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 23 (May 40)? Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/1. Flak-Brig. (Sep-Nov 44); I./Flak-Rgt. 26 (gem. mot.) (Nov 39); le.Flak-Abt. 997(v) (Dec 44); Ln.-Betr.Kp. 161 (Sep-Nov 44). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bittersee (GER) (a.k.a. Bitter See) ( ?? ) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) along the Pommaranian Baltic coast in the general vicinity of Stolp (Slupsk). Not located. History: existed at the time of the 1939 attack on Poland and/or the 1941 attack on the USSR. No information found on wartime activity and may have remained unused throughout the war. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Blankenheim (GER) (50 25 50 N – 06 35 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Nordrhein-Westfalen 55 km SE of Aachen, 52 km SW of Bonn and 4 km W of Blankenheim. History: possibly used at the beginning of the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 550 x 550 meters (600 x 600 (yards) in the shape of a “T”. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.584-638 (19 Sep 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Blexen (GER) (a.k.a. Blexen) (53 31 55 N – 08 32 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) on the west bank of the Weser 3 km directly across from Bremerhaven in Lower Saxony. History: ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Little if any wartime activity. 1944-45 referred to in documents as Industrieplatz Blexen. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 985 meters (1,400 x 1,075 yards). Runway: grass surface on a wet,

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 sand-filled foundation with severe drainage problems. Infrastructure: construction of a large hangar-type building on the SE boundary began in 1941 but was discontinued before completion. No barracks personnel were probably billeted in the village of Blexen. Nearest rail connection at the S corner of the landing ground. Dispersal: none. Defenses: indirectly protected by 6 heavy and 14 light Flak positions between 2 and 10 kilometers from the landing ground, these being part of the Luftwaffe and Kriegsmarine Flak belt protecting Bremerhaven and Wesermünde. These same Flak positions also protected Einswarden seaplane station. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Industrieplatz Blexen of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XI Oldenburg (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.42-43 (31 Dec 43); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Blumenfeld (GER) (47 49 07 N – 08 40 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Wurttemberg 21 km SSE of Donaueschingen airfield and 14 km NW of Singen. History: listed as operational from at least Feb 44 to at least Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Böblingen (GER) (a.k.a. Stuttgart-Böblingen) (48 41 30 N – 08 59 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) and factory airfield (Industriehafen) in Baden-Württemberg 19.5 km SSW of Stuttgart, 2 km SSW of Sindelfingen and 1.2 km NW of the village of Böblingen. History: formerly a World War I airfield dating from July 1915 where pilots and observers were trained. Taken over 1924-25 as an important Verhehrsflughafen (civil airport) serving Stuttgart. Ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936 and the first Luftwaffe units moved in during 1938. Home to numerous fighter units pre-war through Jun 40. Used as a training field and as an Industriehafen by the Klemm Flugzeugbau firm during the war. Klemm manufactured light aircraft. A large Daimler-Benz plant that manufactured aircraft components was located adjacent to the airfield. Dimensions: approx. 1325 x 825 meters (1450 x 900 yards) and pear-shaped. Surface and Runways: grass surface that was soft after heavy raid. No paved runway. A paved (concrete?) perimeter road encircled the

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 landing area. Equipped with perimeter and obstruction lighting, a flare-path and a visual Lorenz system for night operations. Fuel and Ammunition: ample fuel was available and a small ammunition dump was located off the NW boundary. Infrastructure: had 1 medium hangar on the E boundary, 1 medium, 1 large and 1 repair hangar at the SE corner. The SE corner hangars were also surrounded by numerous separate workshops and stores buildings. The Klemm firm’s buildings were at the center of the S boundary and the Daimler-Benz factory lay 1.2 km N of the N boundary on the outskirts of Sindelfingen. The station HQ, admin offices, flight control, barracks, stores buildings and the former airport terminal were all on the E boundary just N of the hangar group. A second group of billets consisting of 12 to 15 huts was at the N end a short distance from the aircraft dispersal. A branch rail line served the hangars and buildings at the SE corner. Dispersal: a row of 26 open aircraft shelters curved along the N boundary with 5 more under construction in early May 44. Two of these were covered with netting. Defenses: 1 heavy Flak position and 2 light Flak positions (Dec 43). Satellites and Decoys: Stuttgart-Maichingen (GER) (48 43 25 N – 08 56 15 E). Dummy 17 km WSW of Stuttgart, 5.7 km NW of Stuttgart-Böblingen airfield and 2 km WSW of Maichingen village. Mock-up consisted of 4 walled rectangles laid out to represent the hangars at StuttgartBöblingen airfield with fake aircraft parked in front of them. AFHRA A5258 p.445 (1944)] Remarks: 19 Jul 44: bombed – 2 x Kl 35s from FFS A 43 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 5 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s Mustangs – claimed 1 x Fw 190, 2 x Ju 88s and 1 x He 111 destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109, 1 x Fw 190, 2 x Ju 87s and 2 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 21 Jan 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed. 1 Mar 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Bf 109 and 2 x unidentified aircraft damaged. According to German reports, just 1 x He 111 was damaged. 19 Mar 45: strafed by approx. 10 P-47s – 1 x Ju 87 destroyed. (German report) 23 Mar 45: bombed and strafed by approx. 16 P-47s – 3 x He 111s damaged and airfield unserviceable. (German report) 20 Apr 45: Stuttgart area taken by French troops. Operational Units: I./JG 433 (Mar-Apr 39); 11./JG 72 (Jul-Aug 39); Stab, II./JG 52 (Aug-Oct 39); 2.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 13 (Oct-Nov 39)?; I./JG - 68 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 54 (Nov 39 – Feb 40); II./JG 51 (Feb-May 40); Stab/JG 54 (Feb-Jun 40); II.(Schlacht)/LG 2 (Aug-Sep 40); I./St.G. 77 (Mar-Apr 42). School Units: FFS A/B 112 (Oct 41 – Aug 43); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 43, FFS A/B 43 then FFS A 43 (Crailsheim); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 13 then FFS B 13 (Roth) (Feb 42 – Jun 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Böblingen (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 8/VII (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Böblingen of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/VII Echterdingen (Apr-Sep 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 219/XII (Sep-Nov 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/VII (Nov 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Böblingen (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 6/VII (Apr 41 – Apr 45); 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp./ZG 76; Luftschutz-Kp. z.b.V. 1/VII (1944-45); 5. (Funkh.)/Ln.-Abt. 356 (Jan-Apr 45); Stab II.(Flugm.)/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 2 (May-Jun 40); Ln.-Kp. (mot) z.b.V. 8 (Waldenbuch, Sep 44 – Apr 45); Ln.-Verbindungs-Kp. z.b.V. 8 (Oct-Nov 44 – refitting); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 17/VII (1940); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 2/VII; Lw.-Sanitäts-Abt. 6/VII (c.Apr 41 – Apr 45); Kleine Zahnstation d.Lw. 2/VII (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.372-75 (29 Jan 44 updated to 9 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bochum (GER) General: not identified - either an auxiliary field 8 to 10 km NNW of Wittmund airfield near the coast in Lower Saxony or a small unused strip in the city of Bochum in the Ruhr. History: listed as operational in Oct 43. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: none known. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bockau (GER) (c. 50 33 08 N – 12 41 42 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Saxony 27 km SSW of Chemnitz and 22 km SSE of Zwickau. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Böckingen (GER) (49 07 25 N – 09 11 02 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 4 km W of Heilbronn. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: Grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bohmte (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to an airfield that may have been a satellite or dispersal field for Osnabrück - see there. Bonn-Hangelar (GER) (50 46 20 N – 07 10 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in North Rhine – Westphalia 6 km ENE of Bonn and 1.5 km N of the village of Hangelar. History: dates from 1909 with military use from the beginning of World War I. Briefly used by the RAF immediately after the war, by the French Air Force from 1919 to 1926 and then reverted to civil use, mainly as an airport and a civil flight school (D.L.V.). While some preliminary development began in 1935, major construction did not begin until 1937 when Hangelar was taken over by the Luftwaffe, and the work was finally completed in 1939. Hangelar received heavy use during the 1940 attack on France, by transport aircraft during 1941 and then by night fighter and other units thereafter. One of the busiest wartime airfields in Germany. Dimensions: approx. 870 x 1370 meters (950 x 1,500 yards). Runway: grass surface with good drainage and an extensive network of taxiways. Infrastructure: full servicing and support capability with 3 large hangars, workshops, and numerous barracks just S and E of the airfield boundary. Dispersal: some 46 large and small open shelters with camouflage netting and another 11 under construction as of June 1944. Defenses: a heavy Flak battery, light batteries and a searchlight battery on and around the airfield. A battery of railway Flak was added in fall 1944. Remarks: 22 Feb 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 1 x Fw 190 destroyed and 2 more damaged. 24/25 Dec 44: 104 RAF Lancasters bombed Hangelar and rendered it unserviceable in what was the first heavy raid on the airfield. While some direct hits on buildings were scored, damage was moderate. 10 Jan 45: bombed by 63 B-17 Fortresses. 21 Mar 45: taken by U.S. troops right after the Lw. demolished the key infrastructure. Operational Units: 2.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Aug 39 – May 40); I./JG 52 (Aug-Nov 39); 10.(Nacht)/JG 26 (Sep-Nov 39); Stab/JG 77 (Oct 39 – May 40); I./ZG 2 (Nov 39 – Jan 40); I./JG 3 (Feb-May 40); 4. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (May 40); Stab, III./KG 76 (May-Jun 40); III./JG 26 (Feb-Mar 41); I./JG 300 (Jul 43 – Jun 44); Stab/JG 300 (May-Jun 44); I./JG 76 (Jul-Aug 44); 1./NJGr. 10 (Aug 44 – c.Feb 45); 2./NJG 11 - 70 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (Aug-Sep 44); 3./NAGr. 13 (Sep 44); Gefechtsverband Hallensleben (Bad Honnef, Sep 44 – Feb/Mar 45?); I., II./JG 6 (Sep-Oct 44); part of I./SKG 10 (Sep-Oct 44)?; 3./NJG 11 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); NSGr. 20 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); Stab, I./SG 4 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); II./SG 4 (Dec 44); 2./NSGr. 2 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); Stab/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); III./NJG 11 (Jan-Feb 45); Nahaufkl.St. 13./14 (Feb-Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 72 (Detmold) (1939); Sprachmittler-Abt. d.Lw. (1943-44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 23/VI (Jul-Aug 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. BonnHangelar (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 14/VI (1943 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/VI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates on the airfield, in town or nearby – not complete): 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp./St.G. 2; Werft-Abt. 10/VI (1944-45); le.Flak-Abt. 784 (Sep 43 – Mar 45); elements of le.Flak-Abt. 889 (Mar 45); Flak-Lehr-u.Versuchs-Abt. 900 (Feb-Mar 45); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 18 (summer 42 – c.early 43); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 19 (summer 42); Luftschutz-Ers.Abt. 2 (B-Venusberg, summer 43 – Sep 44); FlugBetriebsstoff-Kolonne 519/XI (Oct 44); Sprachmittler-Abt. d.Lw. (Jan 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.44-48 (13 Jan 44 updated to 12 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bönninghardt (GER) (a.k.a. Bönninghardt/South) (51 34 15 N – 06 29 00 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 24 km NW of Duisburg, 15 km SW of Wesel and immediately S and SE of Bönninghardt village. History: Originally a field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) for fighters from 1937, upgraded to an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in 1941. Had relatively little wartime use once the campaign in the West concluded in late June 1940. Renewed activity since September 1943. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 640 meters (1,000 x 700 yards). Runway: grass surface. Landing area equipped with beam approach system. Infrastructure: there were three clusters of airfield buildings, the first at the NW corner with c.12 buildings, the second in woods at the SE corner with c.4 buildings and the third in woods at the SW corner with c.5 buildings. Nearest rail connection .8 km to the NW. Dispersal: 4 separate areas around the perimeter with a total of 27 aircraft shelters. Defenses: Jul 44: 3 to 5 Flak positions around the airfield. Nov 44: a 3-gun light Flak position was under construction off the N boundary. Satellites and Decoys:

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Bönninghardt-Sevelen (GER) (51 30 46 N – 06 24 13 E). Dummy 8 km SW of Bonninghardt/Süd landing ground and 2.4 km NW of Sevelen. Mock-up included 2 hangar frames covered with netting, and a dispersal area with a few aircraft shelters. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.603 (1944)] Remarks: 5 Feb 45: airfield ordered completely evacuated (but no mention of demolition). Operational Units: I./JG 52 (May-Aug 39); II./JG 26 (Aug-Oct 39); I./ZG 76 (Oct-Dec 39); III./ZG 26 (JGr. 126) (Nov-Dec 39); Stab/JG 51 (Feb-May 40); I./JG 26 (Feb-Jul 40); II./JG 27 (Apr-May 40); I./JG 20 (Feb-May 40); I./JG 3 (Sep-Oct 43); III./JG 26 (Nov 43, Oct 44); Stab/NJG 1 (Dec 43 – Sep 44); I./JG 11 (Aug 44); NSGr. 1 (Oct 44 – Feb 45); II./JG 77 (Jan 45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 11/VI EssenMülheim (summer 1944)?; Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 229/XI (fall 44 – c.Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.49-51 (6 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site www.flughafenboenninghardt.de] Bork (GER) ( ?? ) General: not located and no information. Probably an auxiliary landing ground either in the Ruhr 17 km N of Dortmund or in Brandenburg 14 km S of Wittstock airfield. Listed as operational in Feb 44 and in Feb 45. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Borkenberge (GER) (a.k.a.Dülmen-Borkenberge) (51 46 40 N – 07 17 00 E) General: landing ground/glider field in North Rhine – Westphalia 20 km NNE of Recklinghausen in the Ruhr, 6.4 km S of Dülmen and just SE of the tiny village of Borkenberge. History: existed as a glider field prior to 1935. No wartime use by operational units noted. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 780 meters (1,000 x 850 yards). Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: 6 small hangars and a few workshop buildings along the W boundary, offices, flying control (Flugleitung), supplies and some limited accomodations. Nearest rail connection at Dülmen. Dispersal: no organized dispersal. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: listed as operational from at least Feb 44 to at least Feb 45. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.52-53 (4 Mar 44 updated to 9 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Borkheide (GER) (52 14 00 N – 12 50 14 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Brandenburg 23 km SSW of Potsdam. History: used as a practice field for single-engine trainers from 1936 to 1945 and as a fighter station from Aug 44 to the end of the war. Surface and Dimensions: moorland with grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Remarks: 2 Nov 44: low-level attack by P-51s – 5 x Bf 109 G-14s from I./JG 3 strafed and destroyed, 3 of them just after landing. Operational Units: II./JG 27 (Aug-Sep 44); I./JG 3 (Aug-Nov 44); I./JG 300 (Oct 44 – Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS 3 (Werder/Havel) (1936-44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A 61 (Werder/Havel) (1944-45). Station Commands: Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 29/III Werder/Havel (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 1./le.Flak-Abt. 722 (Nov-Dec 44); le.Flak-Bttr.z.b.V. 6517 (Dec 44 – Jan 45). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Borkum (Land) (GER) (53 35 40 N – 06 42 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Lower Saxony on the island of Borkum in the East Frisian Islands; airfield located 3 km E of the village of Borkum. History: dates from summer 1914 as a naval air station. New construction under the Luftwaffe began in 1935-36 and two large hangars were erected, each capable of housing 12 aircraft along with numerous other buildings. Dimensions: 1,200 x 1,000 meters plus a 300 meter extension under construction in Oct 43. Runway: grass surface on a sand base. Paved hangar aprons. Infrastructure: fuel, water, ammunition, communications and other amenities were available. See above for other details. Dispersal: 6 large covered aircraft shelters and 3 open shelters along the SW boundary. Defenses: 3 x 3.7-cm guns and 10 machine guns in Dec 39. By Oct 43 this had increased to 10 heavy Flak positions, each with 2 to 4 guns, and 5 light Flak positions, most with 2 or more guns. Airfield served by a light rail system that traversed the island. Remarks: 28 Nov 39: first air attack – strafed by Bristol Blenheims; occasionally raided by a few aircraft to the end of the war. 4 Feb 41: an RAF Blenheim bombed a gun position on Borkum airfield. 15 Apr 41: bombed by RAF Blenheims. 13 Dec 41: station strength totaled 3 officers, 314 NCOs and men, 7 trucks, 2 passenger cars, a bus and 3 motorcycles. - 73 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 17 Jan 45: a lone B-24 Liberator dropped 3 tons of bombs on the airfield as a target of opportunity. Operational Units: 1./JG 52 (Jun-Sep 41); 1./JG 1 (Feb 42 – Mar 43). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 1./Erg.Gr. JG 52 (Sep 41 – Jan 42). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. Borkum of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/XI Wittmundhafen (1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Wetternebenstelle Borkum; elements of le.Flak-Abt. 767 (Oct-Dec 41); elements of le.Res.Flak-Abt. 988 (Jun 42, Jan 43); Alarm-Flak-Battr. 3/XI (Jul 40); Wachzug d.Lw. 83 (Jul 42 - ? ); Wachzug d.Lw. 84 (Jul 42 - ? ); Wachzug d.Lw. 85 (Jul 42 - ? ). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.54-56 (15 Jan 44 updated to 12 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Borkum-See (GER) (53 34 00 N – 06 45 30 E) General: seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) on Borkum Is. in the East Frisians in the North Sea and located 6 km SE of the village of Borkum. History: ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Very active with He 59 and He 115 maritime units during 1940 and prior, but received little use after than. Anchorage: had a single launching ramp. Also, two quays and 3 small jetties with a mammoth crane at the end of one of the jetties for raising and lowering seaplanes. Infrastructure: 2 large and 1 small hangar with repair shops, motor pool with garages, a small barrack block just W of the hangars and another larger block of barracks further to the W with numerous storage huts between the barrack blocks. Dispersal: 3 large open aircraft shelters to the N of the hangars. Defenses: see Borkum (Land) above. Remarks: 28 Nov 39: air attack – 1 x He 59 from 3./Küstenfliegergruppe 106 was slightly damaged at its moorings during an attack on Borkum by RAF Blenheim Is. Operational Units: 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 106 (Jul 37 – Sep 39, Dec 39 – Jul 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 115/XI (See) (1941? – May 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.57-58 (15 Jan 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bracht (GER) (a.k.a. Schönstadt) (50 54 50 N – 08 52 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 14 km NE of Marburg, 4.8 km NE of Schönstadt and 2.4 km ESE of Bracht.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 History: built 1936-37. Used mainly for glider training and during the attack on France and the Low Countries, then dormant until 1944 when improvements were made to convert it into a base for fighters. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 825 meters (1,050 x 900 yards). Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: had a number of long buildings off the SW corner that were probably workshops, and a small group of buildings off the center of the W boundary that were probably barracks. Airfield was served by a branch rail line. Dispersal: 8 medium open aircraft shelters off the N boundary and further parking around a woods off the NE corner in Sep 44. Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Bracht-Kaldenkirchen (GER) (51 15 40 N – 06 08 40 E). Dummy 12 km S of Venlo airfield on the German-Dutch frontier and 4 km SW of Bracht. Mock-up included 2 phony intersecting runways in the middle of Bracht Woods. . [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.604 (1944)] Remarks: Feb 45: listed as still operational. Operational Units: II./KG 1 (Nov 39 – Jan 40); III./KG 28 (Mar-Jun 40); II./KG 76 (May 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Bracht (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 11/XII (Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 232/XI (Oct 44). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.59 (4 Dec 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de (HLdeZ)] Brackel (GER): see Dortmund-Brackel. Brand (GER): see Briesen. Brandenburg (GER) (52 24 10 N – 12 30 40 E) General: factory airfield – land and sea (Industriehafen – Land und See) in Brandenburg 63 km W of Berlin; airfield 4 km WSW of Brandenburg/Havel in a built-up area. History: built prior to 1935, the Arado firm located there and engaged in development, repair and assembly of aircraft ranging from He 111 bombers, medium and small planes, and by 1943 big He 177 bombers. Dimensions: approx. 1445 x 1920 x 1235 meters (1580 x 2100 x 1350 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface. A paved or hardened 730 meter (800 yard) runway aligned ESE/WNW was built in late spring 1944 and essentially completed by the middle of that year. A new perimeter road was built at the same time. At the W end of the airfield there was a slipway accessing Lake Breitling (Breitling See).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, a permanent flarepath, a beam approach system and a visual Lorenz system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstands at both ends of the airfield, and underground fuel storage was near the SW corner and possibly off the E boundry. Infrastructure: factory buildings were in two groups, one on the E side of the field and the other on the W side. The 7 factory and flight hangars on both sides had concrete aprons. Numerous other workshop, machine shop, testing and stores buildings were in close proximity to the hangars. There was a large servicing hardstand on the W side and 4 smaller ones on the E side. Most of the more important factory and station admin buildings were on the E side of the field. Many barrack blocks were adjacent to or near the airfield on the N side and off the NE corner, and these were occupied mainly by Flak personnel. A branch rail line served the hangar and building groups on both sides of the field. Dispersal: there were 2 areas, Northwest and West, with a total of 20 large open aircraft shelters that were camouflaged with netting. Defenses: layout of Flak positions not known. Remarks: the marshaling yards and assorted factories in the industrial city of Brandenburg were bombed a number of times by USAAF bombers, but only one raid appears to have targeted the airfield. 18 Apr 44: airfield bombed by B-17 Fortresses and B-24 Liberators. Feb 45: listed as still in operation. Operational Units: none identified. Station Units: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.525-29 (21 Mar 44 updated to 21 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Brandenburg-Briest (GER) (52 26 10 N – 12 26 40 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Brandenburg 65 km W of Berlin; airfield 8 km NW of Brandenburg/Havel and 2 km SE of the village of Briest. History: built in 1937 and in use by 1938. It was a very active base for both operational units and schools throughout the war, and at various times was home to the He 177 heavy bomber and then to the Me 262 jet fighter. Dimensions: approx.. 1370 x 1190 meters (1500 x 1300 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface that was rough in spots. Had 2 intersecting paved runways, (1) 1785 meters (1950 yards) aligned ENE/WSW, and (2) 1280 meters (1400 yards) aligned NW/SE. Work was underway in mid-1944 to extend the ENE/WSW runway to approx. 2375 meters (2600 yards) when completed. Perimeter tracks and paved taxiways ran along the E, S and W boundaries. Equipped with - 76 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 boundary and obstruction lighting, runway illumination and a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of hangars near the center of the S boundary and a small refueling loop was at the center of the E boundary. A small ammunition store was at the center of the N boundary. Infrastructure: there was 1 large repair hangar, 4 large flight hangars and 1 small hangar projecting out from the S boundary, and 1 large and 1 medium hangar at the SE corner. All of the hangars had paved hangar aprons. The workshop buildings and the station motor pool with garages were also on the S boundary. The main barrack complex was in a woods to the rear of the hangars along with messes and assorted station buildings. A second barrack complex was 2 km SE of the airfield. A branch rail line served the buildings along the S end of the field. Dispersal: had two areas under construction in mid-1944, Northwest and Southeast. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 5 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 5 x He 111s, 5 x Ju 88s, 2 x Do 217s, 2 x Ju 52, 2 x Si 204s and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109, 1 x Fw 190, 1 x Bf 110, 13 x Ju 88s, 1 x He 177, 9 x Ju 52s, 1 x Me 323 and 3 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 14 Jan 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x unidentified aircraft shot up and damaged. 10 Apr 45: airfield bombed by 138 B-17 Fortresses and strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Me 410 destroyed, plus 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. Operational Units: 15./KG 40 (May-Jun 42); I./KG 50 (Jun 42 – Jan 43, Feb-Oct 43); Versuchskdo. Hermann (Apr-Jun 43); Wekusta 7 (Nov 44 – Mar 45). School Units: Fluglehrerschule Brandenburg-Briest (Apr 39 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 4.(Erg.)/KG 50 (Dec 42 – Sep 43). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Brandenburg-Briest (to c. Nov 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. 32/III (to Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 20/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Otto Fruhner (Aug 40 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 50 (Jul 42 – 1943); Werft-Abt. 4/III (Dec 44); elements of Werft-Abt. 105/VI (1945)?; Feldwerft-Abt. z.b.V. 1 (NovDec 42); 105. Flugzeugwartungs-Kp. (Feb-Mar 45)?. - 77 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.521-24 (3 May 44 updated to 19 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Brandis (GER) (a.k.a. Brandis-Waldpolenz) (51 19 45 N – 12 39 10 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Saxony 18 km E of Leipzig and 3 km E of the town of Brandis. History: built during 1934-35 and inaugurated as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Used mainly as an instrument flight training airfield during the war years and, from late 1943, as home station for the He 177 bomber and the Me 163 Komet rocket fighter. Additionally, an air depot was at Brandis during the early part of the war and it was also used as a testing and experimenting location by Junkers- und Motorenwerke A.G. Dessau. Dimensions: unknown. Surface and Runways: had a paved runway built in 1944 that measured 1800 x 80 meters and a paved taxiway. Fuel and Ammunition: both available. There were 5 underground fuel tanks for bulk fuel storage. Infrastructure: there were 4 flight hangars and a repair hangar with paved aprons, and these were concealed along the edge of woods on the N and W sides of the landing area together with adjacent workshops, an assembly building for the Me 163, transformer bunkers and the flight control building and tower. Airfield buildings included the station HQ, the central telephone exchange, barracks, messes, officers’ quarters and houses, officers’ club, commandant’s house and a guard bunker. A branch rail spur off the Beucha-Trebsen line served the N boundary of the airfield. Dispersal: unknown. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 28 May 44: bombed by 19 B-17 Fortresses – one hangar was destroyed and 2 KIA and 4 WIA from FFS B 31. 16 May 45: airfield abandoned by the Germans and it was occupied by U.S. troops. 2 Jul 45: handed over to the Russians. Operational Units: Stab, I./JG 3 (Aug-Sep 39); Wekusta 1 Luftflotte 1 (Oct 39); Transportstaffel II. Fliegerkorps (Nov-Dec 41); IV./NJG 5 (Aug 43 – May 44); II./KG 1 (Nov 43 – Apr 44); III./NJG 5 (Mar-May 44); I./KG 1 (Apr-Aug 44); III./JG 400 (Jul-Sep 44); II./KG 1 (Aug 44); I./JG 400 (Aug 44 – Apr 45); Erprobungskdo. 16 (Aug 44 – Feb 45); II./JG 400 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); Stab/JG 400 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); II./LG 1 (Mar 45); I., III./JG 7 (Apr 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: Fliegerlehrgang 2 Brandis (instrument flight school 2 Brandis) (Oct 35 – Jan 40), BFS 1 (Jan 40 – Oct 43) then FFS B 31 (Oct 43 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: part of Erg.Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (Nov-Dec 39)?; Erg.St./JG 26 (Jul 44); Erg.St./JG 400 (Jul – Sep 44). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Brandis (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 39/IV (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 37/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Paul Aue (Apr 40 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Nachtjagdraumführer 114 (Oct 43 – Jan 44); Koflug Brandis (Jul-Oct 39); Werft-Abt. 5/III (Dec 44); one Zug from 4./le.Flak-Abt. 728 (Mar 44); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 231 (Naunhof, Sep 44 – c.Apr 45); Lw.-Bau-Btl. Brandis (1939-40); Luftpark Brandis (c. 1938-41); E-HafenAusrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Brandis; E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 1/IV. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.530-31 (27 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Braunsberg (GER) (54 22 30 N – 19 50 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in East Prussia 35 km NE of Elbing (Elblag) and 57 km SW of Königsberg. History: still listed as operational in Jan 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 51 then FFS A/B 51 (Heiligenbeil) (1940-42). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Braunschweig (GER) (a.k.a. Brunswick) (52 16 N – 10 31 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfieldS, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Luftkreiskdo. VII (Apr 34 – Feb 38); Luftwaffengruppenkdo. 2 (Feb 38 – Jan 39); Luftflottenkdo. 2 (Feb-Aug 39); Stab/I. Jagdkorps (B-Querum, MarMay 44); Höh.Fliegerkommandeur VII (Oct 37 – Jul 38); Stab/4. Fliegerdivision (Aug 38? – Sep 39); Stab/1. Fliegerausbildungsdivision (Nov 44 – Jan 45); Stab/Fliegerersatzdivision (Apr 44 – Apr 45)?;Höh.Kdr.d.Flakartillerie-Schulen (Apr 42 – Jul 44); FlakSchuldivision (Aug 44 – 1945). Servicing, Repair (Wartungs, Instandsetzungs): see airfields BBroitzem and B-Waggum. Antiaircraft (Flak): Höh.Kdr.d.Flakartillerie im Luftkreis VII (Oct 37 – Jun 38); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 65 (as Flakgruppe Braunschweig) (Jun 43 - 79 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 – 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 123(o) (as Flakgruppe BraunschweigWolfenbüttel) (Oct 39 – Feb 40); 4., 5./schw.Flak-Abt. 117(o) (May 44 – 1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 165(o) (as Flakuntergruppe BraunschweigBroitzem) (Jan 44 – 1945); Luftsperr-Abt. 206(o) (Apr-Nov 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 216(o) (Sep/Oct 43 – 1945); 3./schw.Flak-Abt. 222(o) (Feb-Jun 44); Stab, 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 225(o) (Mar 44 – 1945); 4., 5./schw.Flak-Abt. 232(o) (Jun 44 – 1945); 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 233(o) (Jun 44 – 1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 277 (Eisb.) (Feb-Mar 44); schw.FlakAbt. 280(o) (mid-1943 – 1945); part of schw.Flak-Abt. 306(o) (Apr 44 – 1945); 3./schw.Flak-Abt. 383(o) (Jun-Jul 44); 4., 6./schw.Flak-Abt. 413(o) (Jun-Sep 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 424 (Eisb.) (1943 – Dec 43, FebMay 44); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 461(o) (1943 – Jan 44); 5./schw.Flak-Abt. 521(o) (Jun 44 – 1945); 5./gem.Flak-Abt. 601(v) (Apr 44 – 1945); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 602(o) (Apr-Sep 44); 1./schw.Flak-Abt. 607(o) (Nov 44 – 1945); Flakscheinw.Abt. 619(o) (Apr-Jul 44); 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 627(o) (Jun 44 – 1945); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 762(o) (May-Sep 44); 4./le.Flak-Abt. 770(o) (Apr-Jul 44); le.Flak-Abt. 772 (mid-1943 – 1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 801(o) (1940); 1., 2., 5./le.Flak-Abt. 822 (Eisb.) (Jan-Feb 44); 2./le.Flak-Abt. 871(o) (1942/43 – Mar 44); le.Flak-Abt. 925(o) (Oct 41 – 1945); part of le.Flak-Abt. 933(o) (JanMar 44); 4./le.Flak-Abt. 954 (ETr.) (Jul-Aug 44); Stab, 1./le.Flak-Abt. 972 (ETr.) (Jul-Aug 44). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab/Ln.-Rgt. beim I. Jagdkorps (B-Querum, Sep 43 – Mar 44); Stab I.(Ln.Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. beim I. Jagdkorps (B-Querum, Sep 43 – Mar 44); Stab II. (Tel.Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. beim I. Jagdkorps (B-Querum, Sep 43 – Mar 44); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 2 (B-Querum, Jul 38 – Aug 39); I./Ln.-Rgt. 2 (BQuerum, Jul 38 – Aug 39); V.(Ers.)/Ln.-Rgt. 2 (B-Querum, mid-1940 – Sep 42); Horch-Leitstelle W 2/Ln.-Rgt. 2 (Aug 39 – 1940?); 1.(Betr.), 5.(Ers.)/Ln.-Rgt. 17 (Apr 37 – Jun 38); 12.(Flum.Res.)/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 6 (May 40); Ln.-Abt. 34 (early 1940); Stab and elements/Ln.-Abt. 41 (1940-43); Fluko Braunschweig. Construction (Bau): none identified. Supply Services (Nachschubdienste): none identified. Ground Transport (Transportkolonnen): none identified. Ground Defense and Security, etc. (Landesschützen, usw.): none identified. Medical Services (Sanitätsdienste): Lw.-Lazarett 1/XI (c.193945); Flieger-Untersuchungsstelle 1/VI (Apr 45). Other (sonstige, verschiedene): Fallschirmjäger-Rgt. 3 (Braunschweig-Rautheim, 1940); Unfalluntersuchungsstelle d.Lw. Braunschweig (1944-45). Braunschweig-Broitzem (GER) (52 14 40 N – 10 29 30 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Lower Saxony 5.6 km SSW of Braunschweig. History: the first military airfield at Broitzem dates from 1916. Reverted to agricultural land after World War I and then in 1928 it became the main civil flying school for Dt. Lufthansa after the field was extended and numerous buildings constructed. Taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1934 and used to train reconnaissance pilots. Seldom used by operational units during the war years. Dimensions: approx. 1145 x 1050 meters (1,250 x 1,150 yards). Runway: grass surface. Ladder-type concrete servicing area at NE corner that was mainly used for refueling, and large concrete apron in the hangar area on the N boundary. Infrastructure: full servicing and support facilities. There were 3 large and 2 small hangars at N corner, workshops, vehicle garages and a special “engine washing” chamber or room. Directly behind the hangars was the admin area that included offices, supply buildings, barracks for c. 1,000 men, messes, and an extremely well-equipped gymnasium. A railway spur was connected to the rear of the hangars. Dispersal: organized areas at the NW, SW and NE ends of the airfield had a total of 24 large aircraft shelters in Jan 44. Defenses: 1 x 10-gun heavy Flak position and 3 x 6-gun heavy Flak positions were within 3.6 km of the airfield, and 9 light Flak positions were on or within 5 km of the field. About half of the light Flak was emplaced in towers or on rooftops. Remarks: Braunschweig (Brunswick) marshaling yards, motor vehicle plants, aircraft assembly plants and other targets were heavily bombed throughout the war by both the RAF and the USAAF. (n.d.): high factory chimneys and buildings around the field made it dangerous for take-offs and landings. 8 Apr 44: bombed – 2 x Bü 131 D-2s, 5 x Bü 181Bs, 1 x C 445 and 1 x Go 145A from FFS A 42 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 24 Oct 44: serviceability limited due to cratered landing area and destroyed lighting. 3 Mar 45: bombed by 8th AAF B-17 Fortresses – 5 x Bü 181s, 4 x Kl 35s, 2 x Ar 96s, 2 x Bü 131s, 1 x Si 204 and 1 x Bf 108 destroyed and 1 x Fw 190, 1 x He 111 and 1 x Kl 35 damaged; 1 hangar destroyed, 1 hangar damaged, damage to airfield workshops and barracks. (German reports) 12 Apr 45: Braunschweig taken by U.S. 9th Army. Operational Units: KGr. z.b.V. 101 (May 40); Stab/KG z.b.V. 3 (Mar 41); II./KG z.b.V. 1 (Apr 42, Oct 42); KGr. z.b.V. 700 (Apr-May 42).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: Aufklärungsfliegerschule Braunschweig (Jul 34 – Aug 39); Fallschirmschule 3 (c. 1940-43); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 42 (Helmstedt) (1943-44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Zerst.Gr. (Sep 43 – Mar 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Braunschweig-Broitzem (to c. Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 44/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 24/XI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. (o) 24/XI (spring 44 – 1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 165 (c.Jan 44 – Feb 45); 4./le.Flak-Abt. 925 (1943-44); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 50/XI (1943-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.64, 71-75 (6 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Braunschweig-Querum (GER) (52 17 25 N – 10 33 34 E) General: airfield (Flugplatz) in Lower Saxony 3.5 km NE of Braunschweig city center. History: a hastily organized auxiliary airstrip was established here in late 1944, according to some sources. It was listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none reported. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Braunschweig-Waggum (GER) (a.k.a. Brunswick-Waggum) (52 19 10 N – 10 33 15 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Lower Saxony 6.4 km NNE of Braunschweig city center and adjacent to Waggum village on its SW and S side. History: constructed in 1935, Waggum served as a civil airport on the N side of the airfield, a Luftwaffe flight training, aeronautical technical training and meteorlogical training center on the S and SE side and as a factory airfield (Industriehafen) of the MIAG firm, that assembled Bf 110 aircraft among other things, on the NW side. The airfield was enlarged to its final dimensions in 1938. Dimensions: 1,800 x 1,080 meters. Runway: grass surface with a concrete hangar apron, a large paved servicing area on the N side and 2 smaller paved servicing areas on the S side. Equipped with a beam approach system and the visual Lorenz system for night landings. Infrastructure: full servicing and support facilities. There were 9 large hangars, 4 medium and 3 small in four clusters around the landing area. The MIAG factory had 3 large assembly halls in the NW corner. Admin, supply, classroom and a large number of other buildings were in two groups at the N and S sides of the field. A large block of

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 barrack buildings was situated off the S boundary and a separate group of barrack huts was located in the hangar area at the N end. Dispersal: 4 separate areas at the NW, N, E and SE boundaries in Jan 44 with a total of 23 large and 22 medium aircraft shelters along with 3 parking stands, all connected by taxi tracks. A railway line passed within .8 km of the W boundary. Defenses: 4 heavy Flak positions of 6 guns each between 3 and 6 km from the airfield, and 6 light Flak positions within 2 km of the field. Some of light Flak was mounted in towers and some on rooftops. Satellites and Decoys: Braunschweig-Grassel (GER) (52 21 22 N – 10 36 51 E). Dummy 12 km NE of Braunschweig, 5.7 km NE of BraunschweigWaggum airfield and 1.6 km SE of Grassel. Set up as a decoy for Braunschweig-Waggum airfield and the mock-up included a hangar and a number of parked aircraft. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.605 (1944)] Remarks: surrounded by war production targets, such as the MIAG plant and the Niedersachsiger Motorenwerke that produced aircraft engines and was just 2 km from the SW corner, BraunschweigWaggum was bombed many times during the war. 29 Mar 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 1 x Ju 88 destroyed plus 2 x Ju 88s and 4 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 5 Aug 44: bombed – 3 x He 111Ps from FFS B 37 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 24 Aug 44: bombed - 2 x He 111s, 1 Ju 52 and 1 x Si 204 from FFS B 35 destroyed or damaged on the ground. Operational Units: II.(Schl.)/LG 2 (Jun-Aug 40); Wekusta 26 (Jul-Oct 39); 10.(Schlacht)/LG 2 (c. Aug 40 - Feb/Mar 41); III./LLG 1 (Sep 40 – 1941/42); KGr. z.b.V. 106 (Apr 41); KGr. z.b.V. 102 (Jan-Feb 42); KGr. z.b.V. 400 (Jan-May 43); Wekusta 26 (Ost) (Feb 45). School Units: Segelflugschule d.Lw. Braunschweig-Waggum (Jan – Sep 40); FFS B 37 (Jul – Sep 44); FFS A 118 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); II./JG 107 (Jan – Mar 45); I./JG 110 (Feb – Apr 45). Erg./Ers. Units: KGr. z.b.V. 300 (Jul 42 – Mar 43); IV./KG 27 (Mar – May 43). Station Commands: Jul-Aug 39: mobilized as an E-Hafen with FpN L 37663, but deactivated later in 1939; Flugplatzkdo. BraunschweigWaggum of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 24/XI Braunschweig-Broitzem (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Maj. Bernhard Reimers (Jul 39 ? ); Obstlt. Hermann Schiffers (Nov 42 ? ).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. (o) 29/XI (spring 44 – 1945); elements of le.Res.Flak-Abt. 762 (1943-44); 1./le.Flak-Abt. 925 (1943-44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.64, 76-82 (18 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Braunshardt (GER) (49 54 45 N – 08 32 30 E) General: unfinished airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Hesse 7 km WNW of Darmstadt, 8 km NW of Darmstadt-Griesheim airfield and 2.5 km WSW of Braunshardt village. Its approx. 1650 meter (1800 yard) runway was still under construction when captured by U.S. forces in late March/early April 1945. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.25 (19 Mar 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Breitscheid (GER) (50 40 35 N – 08 10 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 38 km NW of Giessen, 10 km W of Herborn and 1.6 km SW of Breitscheid. History: no use of this airfield found until September 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 1050 meters (1,150 x 1,150 yards). Surface: grass surface. Infrastructure: refueling points along woods at the N corner of the airfield. Had a workshop building off the N boundary and a small group of barracks and offices off the NE corner. Munitions dump with 5 bunkers off the N boundary. Nearest rail connection 4 km ENE of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: not identified. Remarks: 4 Aug 44: Allied photo reconnaissance detected no sign of use, but a fighter unit moved to Breitscheid in mid-September. 6 Oct 44: bombed and strafed by 9th AAF P-47 Thunderbolts – 14 x Bf 109Gs from II./JG 11 destroyed (9) or damaged (5) on the ground. Operational Units: II./JG 11 (Sep – 6 Oct 44); 3./NAGr. 1 (Mar 45); 3./NSGr. 2 (Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 212/XII (c.Oct 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.60 (5 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bremen (GER) (53 05 N – 08 48 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates – specific airfield, if any, not identified): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/Fliegerkorps z.b.V. 2 (May-Jun 40); Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/Luftverteidigungskdo. 8 (Jun 40 – Aug 41); Stab/8. Flak-Div. (Bremen-Oberneuland, Sep 41 – Apr 45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 13(o) (as Flakgruppe Bremen-Süd) (c.Sep 42 – 1945);

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Stab/Flak-Rgt. 26(o) (as Flakgruppe Bremen-Nord) (Feb 41 – 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 56(o) (1941-42)?; Stab/Flak-Rgt. 89 (as Flakgruppe Bremen) (Jul 41 – Jun 44); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 126(o) (1940-41); Stab/Flakscheinw.Rgt. 160(o) (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Bremen) (Jun 41 – 1945); I./Flak-Rgt. 27 (gem. mot.) (c.1937-38); part of I./Flak-Rgt. 52 (gem. mot.) (1940-41)?; schw.Flak-Abt. 117(o) (as Flakuntergruppe Hollerland) (1942-45); Flakscheinw.Abt. 138(o) (1941/42 – Feb 44); 5./schw.Flak-Abt. 162(o) (Jul 44 – 1945); part of schw.Flak-Abt. 163(v) (c.1941-43); schw.Flak-Abt. 185(o) (1943 – Feb 44); part of Luftsperr-Abt. 201(o) (1939 – mid-1941); LuftsperrAbt. 210(o) (1941/42 – Mar 44); all or part schw.Flak-Abt. 222(o) (1941-45); schw.Flak-Abt. 224(o) (Bremen-Hittfeld, Mar 41); 5./schw.Flak-Abt. 231(o) (Jun-Sep 44); Flakscheinw.Abt. 238(o) (1941-45); schw.Flak-Abt. 251(v) (Jun 40 – 1941); gem.Flak-Abt. 261(v) (1939); schw.Flak-Abt. 262(o) (1939-45); part of gem.FlakAbt. 265(v) (1940-42); schw.Flak-Abt. 267(o) (c.1940-41); Flakscheinw.Abt. 268(o) (1939-45); Flakscheinw.Abt. 269(o) (c.193945); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 275(o) (Jan-Jun 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 277 (Eisb.) (Mar-Apr 44); Res.Festungs-Flakscheinw.Abt. 310 (1940-41); part of schw.Flak-Abt. 334(v) (1941-43); 2./Flakscheinw.Abt. 360(v) (Jun-Jul 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 390(o) (as Flakuntergruppe Vegesack) (BremenVegesack, Apr 43 – 1945); 6./schw.Flak-Abt. 456(o) (Aug-Sep 44); Flakscheinw.Abt. 498(o) (1941/42 – 1945); 1./schw.Flak-Abt. 521(o) (Jun 44 – 1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 531(o) (as Flakuntergruppe Stedingen) (Oct 41 – 1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 541(v) (1941-42)?; schw.Flak-Abt. 542(o) (1943-45); Flakscheinw.Abt. 580(o) (May-Jul 44); 1., 6./gem.Flak-Abt. 601(v) (Jun-Jul 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 606(o) (1940-45); Flakscheinw.Abt. 609(o) (May-Jul 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 611(o) (as Flakuntergruppe Ochtum) (1940/41 – 1945); schw.FlakAbt. 615(o) (1942-43); part of gem.Flak-Abt. 617(v) (1940-41); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 755(v) (Oct 44 – 1945); 3., 4./le.Flak-Abt. 822 (Eisb.) (Apr-Jun 44); le.Flak-Abt. 844(o) (1940-45); le.Flak-Abt. 879(o) (as Flakuntergruppe Unterweser) (1942-45); Flakscheinw.Abt. 909(o) (Sep 42)?; le.Flak-Abt. 922(o) (as Flakuntergruppe Hafen) (1940-45); 4./le.Flak-Abt. 925(o) (Nov 44 – 1945); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 12 (BVegesack, Jun 40 – Apr 45); Flak-Geräteausgabestelle 101/XI (BGrohn, Sep 44). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab III.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 202 (c.Oct 42 – 1943); Stab II.(Flum.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 11 (Aug 41); 9.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 11 (Jul 43); Lv-Nachr.Abt. 8 (c.Jun 40 – Sep 41); Stab/Ln.-Abt. 54 (c.Oct 41 – Oct 42)?; Ln.-Abt. 128 (B-Oberneuland, c.Sep 41 – Apr 45); 3.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (Fspr.u.Fschr.Betr.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Abt. 11 (B-Oberneuland, c.Oct 44 – Apr 45); Ln.-Flugsicherungshauptstelle 6 (1944-45); Other (sonstige, verschiedene): Sprengkommando d.Lw. 2/XI; Kleine Zahnstation d.Lw. 12/III (1945). Bremen-Braake (GER) (53 07 40 N – 08 38 51 E). Dummy 12 km WNW of Bremen city center and 1.2 km E of Braake on the W bank of the Weser River. No details and possibly out of use by 1944. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.604 (1944)] Bremen-Brinkum (GER) (a.k.a. Bremen 3) (53 01 00 N – 08 49 40 E). Dummy 15.8 km E of Delmenhorst airfield, 4 km SE of Bremen airfield and 2.8 km ENE of Brinkum. Mock-up included a landing area, hangar and several parked aircraft. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.604 (1944)] Bremen-Lemwerder (GER) (a.k.a. Lehmwärder?) (53 08 50 N – 08 37 15 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) for Weser Flugzeugbau in Lower Saxony 12 km NW of Bremen and 1.6 km S of Lemwerder. Abutted and ran parallel to the W bank of the Weser River. History: built during 1936-37 after filling in a canal that ran across the intended landing area. Weser Flugzeugbau produced Ju 87 and Ju 52 components here. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 915 meters (1000 x 1000 yards) in the shape of the letter “T”. Surface and Runways: grass surface subject to softness in wet weather. No paved runway. A system of concrete roads and taxiways linked the factory buildings and dispersal area. Fuel and Ammunition: aircraft refueled at the N end of the landing area. Infrastructure: had 3 large hangars at the N end, all of which were probably used for aircraft assembly. Vehicle sheds, a boiler building, admin offices, control building, dining hall and stores buildings were adjacent to or near the hangars. A second cluster of 8 stores buildings was sited approx. 550 meters (600 yards) W of the hangar area. Billeting was in houses in the surrounding community. A branch rail line served the hangar area. Dispersal: 2 areas – Northwest Dispersal and Southwest Dispersal with a total of 20 covered aircraft shelters and 6 hardstands. Defenses: there were 2 heavy and 9 light Flak positions near the airfield, with 4 of the light positions mounted in Flak towers. Smoke screen containers were also believed to have been placed along the roads surrounding the airfield. Lemwerder also benefited from the very strong Flak defenses that covered Bremen to the SE. Remarks: believed to have been bombed numerous times as part of the frequent raids on Bremen. Operational Units: none identified. Station Units: Flugplatzkdo. Lehmwärder of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XI Oldenburg (1944-45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): I./Flak-Rgt. 43 (gem. mot.) (1940-41); elements of le.Flak-Abt. 879 (Jun 42); 15. (Flum.Leit)/Ln.-Rgt. 202 (May 43 – Aug 44)? [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.341-44 (20 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Bremen-Neuenlanderfeld (GER) (53 02 45 N – 08 47 00 E) General: airfield in Bremen state/N Germany 4 km SW of Bremen. History: a landing ground first established there in 1913 and it served as a military airfield during World War I. Development of the field continued after the war with the building of a large hangar and the birth of the Focke-Wulf Flugzeugwerk there at the end of 1923. Classified as an airport (Flughafen) in 1927 and as a secondary airport (Flughafen II) in 1932. The Luftwaffe moved in during in 1935 and enlarged the airfield to 800 x 800 meters while it continued to function as a civil airport. By 1939 Neuenlanderfeld was considered one of the most modern airports in Europe. It was a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for the Focke-Wulf firm during the war where Fw 189 reconnaissance planes, Fw 190 fighters and Fw 200 anti-shipping bombers were made, and it was seldom used by operational units. Dimensions: approx. 1415 x 1050 meters (1,550 x 1,150 yards) after wartime expansion. Runways: Had 4 paved runways built in 1937, a paved hangar aprons and a paved taxiway. Remainder of the field was grass on nonporous clay. In Dec 43 the runways measured 1,370 meters, 1,050 meters, 1,000 meters and 825 meters. Fully equipped for night landings. Infrastructure: full servicing and support facilities. The Focke-Wulf aircraft assembly plant was at the NE corner and consisted of some 12 huge buildings covering 51,152 square meters (550,600 square feet) of floor space. The airfield buildings were at the N end and numbered at least 56 and included 5 hangars, numerous storage buildings and a few barracks. Munitions dump off the S boundary. A special branch rail line entered the airfield from the N end. Dispersal: 32 open and well-camouflaged aircraft blast bays off the NW corner. Defenses: heavy Flak position Kirchhuchting with 6 x 12.8-cm guns was 3 km W of the field and another heavy Flak position with 6 guns about 1 km SSE of the airfield. There were also 7 light Flak positions surrounding the field, some of these emplaced in Flak towers. It was also protected by smoke screen generators. Remarks: 1943-45: repeatedly bombed by the Allies because of the Focke-Wulf factory and by war’s end there was little left of the buildings and runways. - 87 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 17 Apr 43: bombed by 107 B-17 Fortresses – 10 x Fw 190s destroyed and 12 more damaged; Focke-Wulf production not affected as most bombs fell NE of the airfield. 9 Oct 43: bombed – Do 17E belonging to Luftdienstkdo. 2/7 destroyed on the ground. 13 May 44: low-level attack – 2 x Fw 190As from II./JG 1 shot up on the ground. Feb 45: airfield listed as still operational. 26 Apr 45: Bremen taken by British forces. Operational Units: I./KG 40 (Nov 39 – Apr 40); Aufkl.St. z.b.V. Bremen (Mar/Apr-May 40); I./JG 27 (Jun-Jul 40)? Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Bremen-Neuenlanderfeld (Aug 39 – Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 5/XI (Mar-May 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 5/XI (late 42 – early 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 83/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Bremen-Neuenlanderfeld of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XI Oldenburg (1944). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Wetterberatungsstelle Bremen. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.61-63 (14 Jan 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bremen-Nord (GER) ( ?? ) General: no details, but almost certainly an a.k.a. for BremenLemwerder. Station Commands: Flgh.Stützpunktkdo. 6/XI (1941 - Oct/Nov 42?). [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bremerhaven-Wesermünde (GER) (a.k.a. BremerhavenWeddewarden) (53 35 00 N – 08 33 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Lower Saxony 4.4 km NNW of Bremerhaven. History: built in 1925 and classified a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz) in 1927 and an airport second class (Flughafen II) in 1932. Taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1935 and 4 very large hangars and 1 large repair hangar were built off the NW boundary along with workshops, admin buildings and barracks. Home station for mainly seaplane units during the war that used the Columbus Docks a few hundred meters from the S boundary. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 915 meters (1,300 x 1,000 yards). Runway: grass surface with paved hangar aprons and servicing platforms, 2 assembly tarmacs on the NE boundary and a paved perimeter road. Infrastructure: refueling points and other servicing facilities were available. See above for hangars and buildings. There was a small munitions dump off the SE boundary. Airfield served by a branch rail line.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: the N and S dispersal areas had a total of 14 small covered aircraft shelters and 4 small open shelters in Jul 44. Defenses: protected by the Bremerhaven Flak defenses (mostly naval) that included at least 3 heavy and 7 light Flak positions within a few kilometers of the airfield. Remarks: Bremerhaven was bombed numerous times during the war but the airfield does not appear to have been intentionally targeted. Apr 45: Lw. Erprobungsstelle Karlshagen (a.k.a. Peenemünde-West) withdrew to Wesermünde where it planned to continue the development of rocket weapons, a number of which were found in Wesermünde’s hangars after the surrender. 7 May 45: airfield taken by British troops. Operational Units: 1./JG 54 (Oct 40 – Jun 41); Stab, 2./Minensuchgruppe 1 (Oct 42 May 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Gr./ZG 76 (Mar – Sep 41); Erg.St./Minensuchgruppe 1 (Apr – Oct 43). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 124/XI (See) Wesermünde/Nord (Apr 42 – Mar 44); Flugstützpunktkdo. 102/XI (See) (1942 – c.Jan 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 33/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Wesermünde of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 14/XI Stade (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug 5/XI (c.Nov 41 – Jan 42); Wetterberatungsstelle Wesermünde; RAD-Abt. 5/170 (Sep 44 - ?). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.65-68 (21 Feb 44 updated to 29 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Breslau (GER) (a.k.a. Wrocław) (51 06 54 N – 17 02 19 E) Garrison and Station Units (on various dates – specific airfield not identified): Stab/Luftgaukdo. 6 (Apr 36 – Oct 37); Stab/Luftgaukdo. VIII (Oct 37 – Mar 43, Feb 44 – Sep/Oct 44); Stab/9. Flak-Div. (MayAug 44); elements of Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 50 (Jan 45); elements of Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 52 (Jan 45); Luftschutz-Kp. z.b.V. 4/VIII (Apr 45); Stab I.(le.RV)/Ln.-Rgt. 120 (Jun 42); Stab, I. and II./LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 8 (B-Hartlieb - Jul 38 – 1941); VI./Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 8 (BKlettendorf – Nov 41); Ln.-Abt. (mot) z.b.V. (c.Sep 39 – early 40); Telegrafenbau-Abt. (mot) z.b.V. 4 d.Lw. (Jan-Mar 41); Stab/Ln.Telegrafenbau-Abt. z.b.V. 7 (c.1943 – 1945); Ln.-Telegrafenbau-Abt. z.b.V. (Sep-Oct 39); Ln.-Betr.Kp. 129 (May-Aug 44); Flughafenbereichs-Ln.-Kp. z.b.V. 12 (fall 40? – May 41); FlugmeldeFunk-Kp. z.b.V. 21 (Jan-Feb 45); elements of Ln.-RV-Betr.PersonalKp. z.b.V. 21 (1942 – Jan 43); Ln.-Flugsicherungshauptstelle 7 (194445); Flieger-Geräteausgabe- und Sammelstelle 1/II (1944-45)?; Kfz.Beständelager d.Lw. 8/III A (Hartlieb – Aug 43); Kfz.Beständelager - 89 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 d.Lw. 8/VIII A (Hartlieb – Aug 44); Kfz.Beständebezirk d.Lw. 13/VIII (May 44); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 102/XII (Jan-Feb 45)?; Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 2/VIII (B-Klettendorf, 1945); Transport-Begleit-Kp. d.Lw. 2/III (Dec 44 – Mar 45); Flieger-Untersuchungsstelle 2/VIII (Mar 43); LuftgauSanitätspark VIII (c.1939-45); Verwaltungsnachschublager d.Lw. 1/VIII (Oct 44); Verwaltungsnachschublager d.Lw. 4/VIII (Oct 44); Lw.-Auskunftsstelle 3/IV (1944-45); Kraftfahr-Ausbildungs-Abt. d.Lw. 7 (Mar 43). Breslau-Gandau (GER) (a.k.a. Wrocław-Gadów in present-day SW Poland) (51 07 45 N – 16 58 15 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in former Silesia 5 km WNW of Breslau city center. History: B-Gandau was a civil landing ground, then in 1932 it was designated a customs airport of the 1st Order (Flughafen I). The field was shared with the Junkers aviation firm which used in as an industrial airfield. The Luftwaffe used it mainly as a training field during the war years. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 1100 meters (1000 x 1200 yards) with an “L” shape. Surface and Runways: firm, level grass. No paved runway. Equipped for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were located in front of the medium hangars on the SE side with bulk fuel storage among buildings on the N boundary. Infrastructure: there were 11 hangars in all – 1 large hangar, 2 medium hangars, assorted workshop and stores buildings, airport buildings and flight control building on the N boundary where the former civil airport used to be; 1 very large hangar, 3 large hangars and 4 medium hangars with numerous separate workshop and factory admin buildings at the SE corner where the Junkers plant was located. Two short servicing hardstands fronted the hangars at the SE corner. A small barracks complex was situated off the E boundary and probably used by factory personnel. A branch rail line served the factory buildings. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities except for 4 open aircraft shelters along the SE perimeter. Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Breslau-Goldschmieden (GER) (51 08 30 N - 16 54 40 E). Dummy 10 km WNW of Breslau, 4 km WNW of Breslau-Gandau airfield and immediately E of the village of Goldschmieden. The mock-up covered approx. 1000 x 825 meters (1100 x 900 yards) and replicated the layout of Breslau-Gandau airfield complete with sham hangars, buildings, fake aircraft, etc. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.964 (1944)] - 90 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Remarks: Feb 45: listed as still in operation. Operational Units: Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 1/8 (1939-40); IV./KG z.b.V. 2 (Aug-Sep 39); Wetterflugstelle Breslau-Gandau (1939-45); SanitätsFlugber. 8 (Mar-Jul 41); San.Flugbereitschaft 8 (Apr-Jun 41); Stab, I., II./JG 3 (Jun 41); Kurierstaffel 6 (Oct 41)?; I./KG 6 (Aug-Sep 43); II./KG 6 (Sep 43). School Units: elementary flight school Breslau-Gandau (Jan 34 – Mar 39); FFS A/B 3 (Aug-Dec 39)?; Arbeitsplatz for LKS BreslauSchöngarten/LKS 5 (1939-45); Schule/FAR 71 (Jun – Nov 40); Arbeitsplatz for BFS 6 (Radom) (Oct 40 – Mar 41); 5./JG 105 (Oct 44 – Jan 45). Station Commands: Fliegerhorstkommandantur A Breslau-Gandau (this grew in size over the course of the war but never received a number, or at least no evidence has been found that it did). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Maj. Paul Kästner ( ? ? ) 4/41; Hptm. Schlitt (acting) ( ? ? ) 6/41; Oberst Wolfgang Wehl ( ? - 24 Aug 43). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug 9/III (Jan 43 – Jun 44); Koflug 6/VIII (Jun 44 – Jan 45); Werft-Abt. 105/III (194445)?; Werft-Abt. 107/III (1944-45)?; remnants of Werft-Abt. 106/IV (Sep 44); Werft-Abt. 107/IV (1944-45); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 24/VIII (1944-45); schw.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 270/VIII (1944-45); 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 109 (Feb-Apr 45); Ln.-Betr.Kp. (H) (mot) 3 (15 May 41); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 22/XVII (15 May 41); Luftzeuggruppe 8 (15 May 41); Lw.Sanitätsbereitschaft 2/XIII (15 May 41); Auffanglager d.Lw. BreslauGandau (Jan 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.532-34 (25 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Breslau-Langenau (GER): see Langenau. Breslau-Schöngarten (GER) (a.k.a. Wrocław Strachowice in present-day SW Poland) (51 06 25 N – 16 55 10 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in former Silesia 8 km W of Breslau (Wrocław) city center and 1.6 km ESE of the suburb of Schöngarten. History: built 1936-37. Following its participation in support of the campaign in Poland in 1939, its principal wartime use was as a home for an air cadet college. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1000 meters (1300 x 1100 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface on clay sub-soil. No paved runway. A perimeter road ran along the N and W boundaries. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, flare-path and a beam approach system for night landings. - 91 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were located on the servicing hardstands on the N boundary. A small ammunition dump was at the NE corner. Infrastructure: there were 9 hangars along the N boundary – 1 large repair hangar, 5 large flight hangars, 2 medium flight hangars and 1 small flight hangar, all with paved hangar aprons and interconnected by taxiways. Workshop buildings were near the repair hangar, while the motor pool and garages were off the NW corner. Station admin offices, barracks, officers’ quarters, messes, canteens, etc., were all off the NW corner to the rear of the hangars. Other buildings, including lecture halls and stores (supply), were along a road off the N boundary. A branch rail line probably served the buildings on the N side of the field. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: Feb 45: listed as still operational. Operational Units: I./JG 331 (Feb-Apr 39); Stab, II./St.G. 77 (c. May-Sep 39); Stab, I./KG 76 (Aug-Sep 39); I./KG 152 (Sep 39); Stab, I., II./KG 1 (Sep 39). School Units: LKS Breslau-Schöngarten (Apr 39 – Jan 40) then LKS 5 (Jan 40 – Apr 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. L Breslau-Schöngarten and then as Fl.H. Breslau-Schöngarten (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 44/IV (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 44/III (1 Apr – 15 Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 6/VIII (15 Jun 44 – c.Feb 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Obstlt. Ludwig Schulz (Aug 40 ? ) 6/41. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Breslau (Jul 39 – Jun 41); Werft-Abt. 51/III (1944-45); 7. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 76 (1939-40); Werft-Kp. 4 and 5 (15 May 41); Werft-Kp. 10 (Jun 41); Trsp.Kol. 10/VII, 16/VII, 17/XII, 19/XII (15 May 41); FlugzeugBergungstrupp 13/Westfrankreich (15 May 41); FlugzeugBergungstrupp 14/Westfrankreich (15 May 41); FlugzeugBergungstrupp 22/Westfrankreich (15 May 41); Sanitätsbereitschaft (mot) d.Lw. 2/XIII (LL) (May 41 - ? ). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.535-37 (25 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Brieg (GER) (a.k.a. Brzeg in present-day SW Poland) (50 50 20 N – 17 24 47 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in former Silesia 40 km SE of Breslau (Wrocław) and 5 km SW of the town of Brieg.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 History: built 1936-37. Used almost exclusively for tactical reconnaissance training during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1190 meters (1300 x 1300 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: firm and level grass surface on clay sub-soil. A single paved runway measured approx. 1190 meters (1300 yards) and was aligned E/W. An extension to 1325 meters (1450 yards) was believed to have been under construction in mid-1944. Perimeter tracks and taxiways ran along the N, E and S sides of the landing area. Equipped with runway, perimeter and obstruction lighting, and a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in the NE corner in front of the hangars with possible bulk storage some 1300 meters to the SSE. The base ammunition dump was off the S boundary. Infrastructure: 7 hangars – 1 very large repair, 1 large repair, 4 large flight and 1 medium flight – were in a row that curved around the N boundary and all had paved aprons that were interconnected by taxiways. Separate workshops were adjacent to or near the hangars and the station motor pool and garages were off the NE corner. Station HQ, admin offices, barracks, messes, canteens, stores, etc., were all off the N boundary while the flight control building was off the NE corner. A small camp of huts off the SE corner housed POWs who worked on the airfield. A branch rail line served the N and E boundaries of the field. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 17 Sep 42: reorganized from a Leithorst to a Fliegerhorstkommandantur A. 22 Jan 45: Brieg surrounded by Soviet troops. Operational Units: Aufkl.Gr. 113 (Oct 36 – Sep 37); Aufkl.Gr. 13 (Oct 37 – Oct 38); Schlachtfliegergruppe 10 (Sep-Oct 38); Aufkl.Gr. 31 (variously, Nov 38 – Apr 41); I./St.G. 77 (May-Aug 39); III./KG 77 (Sep 39); Aufkl.St. 3.(F)/Nacht (May-Dec 44); Aufkl.St. 2.(F)/Nacht (Aug-Dec 44); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Aug-Dec 44). School Units: Aufklärungsschule Brieg (Oct 39 – Jan 40); Aufklärungsschule 2 (Jan 40 – Oct 42); Blindfluglehrgang Brieg (1941); Stab and I./Nahaufklärungsschule (eins.) 2 (Oct 42 – Feb 43); I./Nahaufklärungsgeschwader 102 (Feb 43 – Aug 44); JG 117 (AugOct 44); II./JG 105 (Aug 44 – Jan 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Nachtaufkl.St. (Mar 43 – Feb 44); 4.(Nacht)/Erg.Fernaufkl.Gr. (May 43 – Jun 44); 4.(Erg.)/NJG

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 7 (Feb – Nov 44); Ausb.Kdo./Erprobungskdo. 16 (Jul 44); 6./Erg.Aufkl.Geschw. 1 (Jan-Feb 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Brieg (to 1943); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 45/III (1 Apr – 15 Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 5/VIII (15 Jun 44 – Jan 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Obstlt. Karl Barlen (1936 - 10 Mar 37); Oberst Josef Punzert ( ? ? ) 9/39. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Brieg (Jul 39 – Jun 41); Koflug 2/VIII (Jun 41 – Jan 43); Res. Flugh.Betr.Kp. 5/VIII (Brieg-Hermsdorf); Werft-Abt. 52/III (1944 – Jan 45); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 50/IV (1943-45)?; Stab and elements/Luftgau-Nachr.Abt. 8 (Feb 45)?; Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 4/VIII ( ? – Nov 40); E-Hafen-AusrüstungsKolonne (mot) Brieg; E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 3/VIII (Brieg-Dornberg); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 204/XI (Jan 45); LuftwaffenSanitäts-Bereitschaft Brieg. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.538-40 (28 Jun 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Briesen (GER) (a.k.a. Briesen-Brand, Brand, Lüben-Briesen) (52 02 30 N – 13 44 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Brandenburg 60 km SE of Berlin, 15.5 km NW of Lübben and 3 km SE of the village of Briesen. History: 1938-39 in construction. Used as a practice field for trainers and gliders. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 825 x 1000 meters (900 x 1100 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: had a few workshops and limited barrack accommodations off the SW corner. The nearest rail connection was in Brand on the Berlin-Cottbus line, 1.6 km to the SE. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 82 (Cottbus) then FFS A/B 82 (Pretzsch) (1939-42); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 3 (Guben). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 28/IV (May 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 19/IV (1941 – Feb 43?). Station Units (on various dates): Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 37/III (Mar 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.541 (14 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Brockhagen (GER) ( ? ) General: satellite field? Location unknown; but possibly 7.5 km NE of Gütersloh airfield or 6 km SSE of Halle. Listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Brockzetel (GER) (53 28 50 N – 07 39 25 E) General: Operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Ostfriesland c. 31.5 km W of Wilhelmshaven, 11 km E of Aurich and 7 km from Wittmundhafen airfield. History: planned as an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) to serve as a satellite or alternative airstrip for Wittmundhafen, construction began in 1941 but immediately ran into trouble due to wet ground. Although work continued to the end of the war, Brockzetel was downgraded to a low priority for labor and materials. It is probable that no operational units were ever stationed here. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1145 meters (1,300 x 1,250 yards). Runway: grass surface - concrete runway construction underway from late spring 1944 and about 600 meters completed but then further construction was halted. Infrastructure: admin area with several buildings on the SE boundary, a RAD barracks, an underground fuel take and a munitions dump with numerous storage bunkers. A second barracks camp was built along the W boundary for Italian POWs at first and then they were replaced by Dutch convicts. Nearest rail connection at Aurich 12 km to the W. Dispersal: 2 large open aircraft shelters on the E boundary. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 10-12 Apr 45: attacked by RAF Typhoons – 1 x Ju 88, 2 x Ju 188s, 1 x He 111 plus 2 unidentified aircraft claimed destroyed on the ground. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Brockzetel (Aug 39 – Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 18/XI (Mar-Apr 40); Flugplatzkdo. Brockzetel of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/XI Wittmundhafen (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.69-70 (6 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Bronkow (GER): see Calau-Bronkow. Bruchsal (GER) (49 08 10 N – 08 33 52 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 20 km NE of Karlsruhe; airfield 2 km W of Bruchsal. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Remarks: Feb 45: airstrip listed as operational. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Flak-Rgt. 20 (mot.) (Aug 39); Festungs-Flak-Rgt. 35(v) (1938-39); Res.FestungsFlak-Abt. 351 (Aug 39). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Brunnthal (GER) (a.k.a. München-Brunnthal, Munich-Brunnthal) (48 00 40 N – 11 41 10 E) General: remote aircraft parking area (Abstellplatz) and/or satellite field (Schattenplatz) in Bavaria 16 km SE of München (Munich) and immediately N of Brunnthal village. History: set up 1944-45 after the airfields at München-Riem and München-Neubiberg fell under constant Allied air attack. There were two runways, one of which was a section of the München-Salzburg Autobahn. Surface and Dimensions: leveled agricultural land measuring approx. 1420 x 185 meters (1550 x 200 yards). Infrastructure: none. Nearest rail connection 2.5 km to the E. Dispersal: the aircraft were sheltered in bays in the forests that bordered the Munich-Salzburg Autobahn, one lane of which served as a runway and the other lane as a taxiway. There were accomodations for approx. 100 aircraft. Defenses: A Flak dispositions map from early 1945 shows no heavy Flak batteries within 5 km of the airfield and 4 light Flak batteries close around it. Remarks: 9 Apr 45: bombed by B-17 Fortresses and strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – 17 x Ju 88s from V./NJG 2 destroyed or damaged on the ground (incomplete German sources). The P-51s claimed 60 destroyed and 42 damaged, these of various types but mostly single engine and twin engine fighters. 16 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 22 destroyed or damaged, mostly Ju 88s, Do 217s, Si 204s and a few single engine fighters. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.279 (7 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Brunswick (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Braunschweig - see there. Brüsterort (GER) (a.k.a. Donskoye in the present-day Russian enclave in former East Prussia) (54 56 15 N – 19 59 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) 40 km NW of Königsberg (today Kaliningrad) in the former East Prussia, 34 km NNE of Pillau and 2.8 km S of Brüsterort Point on the Samland Peninsula. History: originally built in the mid-1930’s as a Flakartillerie training school with gunnery range and a small airstrip for use by target-towing

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 aircraft. Following several busy months during the Sep 39 attack on Poland and the May-Jun 41 buildup for the attack on Russia, Brüsterort was mainly used as a practice field for trainers and continued use as a Flakartillerie gunnery range. It became busy again in fall 1944 during the German retreat from Russia and the Baltic States. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1100 meters (1100 x 1200 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface No paved runway but the taxiway was paved. Fuel and Ammunition: had two sets of refueling points on the N boundary. Infrastructure: there were 2 large hangars off the NW corner with paved hangar aprons and interconnected by taxiways. The motor pool and garages were immediately SW of the hangars. A block of barracks was behind the hangars and another off the N boundary. A cluster of huts off the S boundary were probably workshops and/or additional accommodations. The nearest rail connection was a station just off the W boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 31 Jan 45: low-level attack - 2 x Ju 52s from I./TG 1 destroyed on the ground. 20 Feb 45: low-level attack – 1 x Fw 190 F-8 from I./SG 3 destroyed on the ground. 9 Mar 45: bombed – 1 x Fw 190 F-8 from I./SG 3 damaged on the ground. 14 Apr 45: town and airfield captured by Soviet troops. Operational Units: Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 3/68 (Apr 38 – 1940?); I. (Stuka)/Trägergruppe 186 (Aug-Sep 39); II.(Jagd)/Trägergruppe 186 (Aug-Sep 39); 2./Kü.Fl.Gr. 806 (Oct-Dec 39); NSGr. 12 (lett.) (Oct 44); I./SG 3 (Feb-Apr 45); I./JG 51 (Mar-Apr 45); III./JG 51 (Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 5 and Schule/FAR 33; Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 125 then FFS A 125 (Neukuhren) (1941-44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Brüsterort (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 33/I (Feb-Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 9/I (Apr 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 19/VI (AprJun 41). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): part of FeldwerftAbt. I/60 (Jan-Feb 45); II./Flak-Rgt. 11 (gem. mot.) (Oct 35 – c. 1938); Feld-Flakartillerieschule (Mitte) 15 (1942); Flakschiessplatz Brüsterort (1940-45); 11.(Flum.Leit)/Ln.-Rgt. 224 (Jul 43 – Aug 44); Stab II.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 260 (Sep 44 – Feb 45)? [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.542 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 97 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Buchenfeld (GER) ( ?? ) General: satellite or dispersal airstrip in Baden-Württemburg near Böblingen airfield. Not located. Possibly the name of a wartime village that was incorporated into another village or town after the war. Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/VII Böblingen (Dec 44 – Apr 45). [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Buchschwabach (GER) (a.k.a. Müncherlbach) (49 22 10 N – 10 51 40 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Bavaria 15 km SW of Fürth and 2 km WNW of the village of Buchschwabach. History: used for fighter training during the war and by fighters at the very end of the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1050 x 1050 meters (1150 x 1150 yards) with an irregular shape. Infrastructure: 2 medium hangars and several workshop-type buildings grouped together along the N boundary. Several barrack buildings were concealed in the woods N of the hangars. Nearest rail connection 1.2 km from the N boundary. Dispersal: a small grove of trees at the S corner was used for dispersal and concealment. Remarks: 25 Feb 45: strafed by approx. 8 P-51 Mustangs – 1 x Bf 109 damaged. (German reports) Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Jagdfliegerschule 4 (Jan 40 – Mar 43); elements of I./JG 104 (Mar 43 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XII Fürth (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 32/VII Fürth (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug 11/XII (12/44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.83 (26 Aug 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Buchwalde (GER) ( ?? ) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 62.5 km ENE of Dresden and 8 km NE of Bautzen-Litten airfield (Buchwalde) or 51 km NW of BautzenLitten airfield and 23 km SE of Finsterwalde (Neu Buchwalde). History: listed as operational from at least Feb 44 to at least Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bückeburg (GER) (52 15 20 N – 09 01 05 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Lower Saxony 47 km W of Hannover, 8 km ESE of Minden; airfield 2 km WSW of Bückeburg. History: used for glider training. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 730 x 275 meters (800 x 300 yards). Infrastructure: had 2 small admin buildings in a woods off the NW corner. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.584-638 (26 Jun 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bückeburg-Müsingen (GER) (52 16 30 N – 09 04 55 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Lower Saxony 47 km W of Hannover, 8 km ESE of Minden; airfield 2.6 km ENE of the town. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: hardened grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Büdesheim (GER) (c. 50 13 13 N – 06 32 42 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 10 km E of Prüm and 27 km N of Bitburg in the Eifel. History: listed as operational from at least Dec 39 to at least Jan 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Buer (GER): see Gelsenkirchen-Buer. Bug auf Rügen ( land and sea) (GER) (a.k.a. Bug-Wittow) (54 36 00 N – 13 13 30 E) General: airfield and seaplane station (Fliegerhorst and Seefliegerhorst) in Mecklenburg 32 km NNE of Stralsund on the Baltic coast and 5 km SW of the village of Wiek. History: opened as a training school in 1934-35 and established as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Served as the Luftwaffe’s main or one of the main stations for navigation, bombardier and gunnery schools throughout the war. It was also an important air-sea rescue station for the western Baltic. Dimensions: approx. 730 x 595 meters (800 x 650 yards) and rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. The landing area was connected to the seaplane station facilities by taxiway.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Anchorage: ample alighting area in the Baltic and in the Wieker Bodden, but ice was liable to form in the winter. Seaplane station had 5 concrete slipways – 1 facing the Baltic and 4 facing the Wieker Bodden. There were 2 jetties at the N end with one on either side of the peninsula, and 1 jetty at the S end, this one having a crane. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points on the S and W ends of the station. The ammunition dump was in a woods to the W of the repair hangar. Infrastructure: there were a total of 9 hangars in three groups – (a) 2 medium hangars with paved aprons and separate workshops at the N end; (b) 2 very large hangars interconnected by a servicing hardstand in the middle of the station; and, (c) 1 very large repair hangar, 1 very large flight hangar, 2 large flight hangars and 1 small flight hangar at the S end with access to a small bay. Station buildings, including admin offices, barracks, officers’ quarters, dispensary, etc., were located behind the hangars and in a woods 1.6 km SSW of the station. A branch rail line connected the station to the main land at Stralsund. Dispersal: there were 3 aircraft dispersals – North, East-Northeast and Southwest with a total of 9 medium open aircraft shelters plus 15 parking hardstands in bays that had been cut into the surrounding woods. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: (n.d.): low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x BV 138 destroyed. Operational Units: 1./Kü.Fl.Gr. 306 (Sep-Oct 39); 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 806 (c. Nov 39 – Feb 40); 1./Kü.Fl.Gr. 906 (Dec 39 – Jan 40); 9. Seenotstaffel (Feb-Aug 44); Seenotgruppe 81 (Aug 44 – Apr 45); Seenotgruppe 70 (Oct-Nov 44); Seenotstaffel 70 (Oct-Nov 44); Stab, 1., 3./Bordfliegergruppe 196 (Oct 44 – Mar 45); 1./SAGr. 126 (FebMar 45); 3./SAGr. 126 (Oct 44 - Feb 45); 2./Bordfliegergruppe 196 (c. Feb-Apr 45). School Units: Fliegerwaffenschule (See) Bug/Rügen (Oct 36 – Jan 40); Fliegerwaffenschule (See) 2 (Jan – Dec 40); Bombenschützenschule Bug (Oct 40 – Dec 41); Kampfbeobachterschule Bug (Jan – Oct 42); Stab/Kampfbeobachtervorschule 2 (Oct 42 – Jan 43); Bordschützenschule 5 (1943-44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 17 then FFS B 17 (Pütnitz) (Jan 41 – Sep 44); LKS (KON) 12 (Aug 44 – Apr 45); Ausbildungsfliegerführer Ostsee (c. Jan – Apr 45). Station Commands: Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 9/III Parow (194445); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 208/I (Oct-Dec 44). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Seenotbereichskdo. VI (Jun 42 – c. 1943/44); Seenotbezirkstelle (L) Bug auf Rügen (Aug - 100 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 39 – Jun 42); Seenotflotille 6 (Jun 40 or Jun 42 - 1943); Seenotflotille 70 (Oct-Nov 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.543-46 (22 Jun 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bug-Wittow (GER): see Bug auf Rügen. Bühl (GER) (c. 48 38 24 N – 08 07 57 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 11 km SW of Baden-Baden. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bunzlau (GER) (a.k.a. Boleslawiec in present-day SW Poland) (51 19 30 N – 15 33 10 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Silesia 43 km NNW of Hirschberg (Jelenia Gora) and 40 km W of Liegnitz (Legnica); airfield located 5 km NNW of Bunzlau. The presence of a large number of airfield guard personnel there in Jan-Feb 45 suggests that aircraft were using it at that time, perhaps as a dispersal field. History: a Notlandeplatz as early as 1927 and continued to serve in that capacity to the end of the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface overlaying sandy moorland. Infrastructure: no information. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 72/XI (Jan-Feb 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 211/XI (Feb 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 283/XI (Feb 45)? [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.956 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Burg bei Magdeburg (GER) (52 15 30 N – 11 54 30 E) General: Airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Anhalt 20 km NE of Magdeburg and 4 km ESE of Burg. History: construction began in spring 1937 and concluded in spring 1939. Burg was one of the three largest airfields in that part of Germany and was flush with infrastructure. It was home to numerous bomber units during the war and in Nov 43 became the crew conversion center for the He 177 strategic bomber and then in 1944 for the Ar 234 jet bomber. In 1945 Burg was home to a night fighter unit equipped with Me 262 jets. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1280 meters (1300 x 1400 yards) amd roughly pear shaped. Surface and Runways: grass surface on a clay foundation. Two paved runways, one 1,400 x 50 meters aligned ENE/WSW and the other 1,200 x 40 meters aligned NE/SW, paved hangar aprons and paved taxiways. A perimeter road ran along the E, S and W

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 boundaries. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, runway illumination, a beam approach system and a visual Lorenz system for night operations. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the hangars on the SE boundary. At least 1 small ammunition dump was off the S corner. Infrastructure: had 4 large aircraft hangars with paved aprons, a large repair hangar with a paved apron, numerous workshop buildings, control building, motor pool with 4 large garage buildings, 9 barracks, 5 building blocks for officer housing, station HQ, dispensary, officer’s club, and a number of other buildings. Nearly all of the hangars and buildings were on the SE boundary. Additionally, a small group of barrack huts off the NE corner housed French POWs who worked on the airfield. A branch rail line served the S corner of the airfield. Dispersal: 3 areas – North, Southeast (remote) and West with a total of 5 large open aircraft shelters, 8 small open aircraft shelters and 40 parking bays that had been cut into the woods. Defenses: unknown, but undoubtedly heavy during 1944-45. Remarks: 9 May 44: bombed – 1 x Fw 58 from I./JG 3 destroyed. 20 Jun 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x Ju 52 destroyed, plus 1 x He 177 damaged. 29 Jun 44: attacked by 46 B-24 Liberators dropping 115 tons of bombs and strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x He 111s and 2 x Ju 52s destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 110 damaged. 24 Aug 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 6 x Ju 88s destroyed. 24 Dec 44: Allied photographic reconnaissance noted that the ENE/WSW runway was being extended to a length of approx. 2000 meters (2200 yards). 10 Apr 45: hit by 147 B-17 Fortresses dropping 439 tons of bombs that in 10 minutes destroyed 85% of the airfield and bringing a permanent end to flying operations; 4 x Me 262s from 10./NJG 11, 3 x Me 262 A-1s from 2./JG 7 and 3 x Me 262s from 2./NAGr. 6 destroyed or damaged (incomplete German sources). Also strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-51s which claimed 2 x Fw 190s, 2 x Me 262s, 5 x Me 410s, 3 x He 111s, 2 Ju 88s and 1 x Ar 234 destroyed, plus 2 x Fw 190s and 1 x Ju 87 damaged. Operational Units: 17./KGr.z.b.V. 5 (Jan-Nov 39); I./KG 3 (Sep 39 – Mar 40); III./KG 1 (Dec 39 – Feb 40); I./KG 50 (Sep-Oct 43); II./KG 40 (Oct 43); Stab/KG 1 (Nov 43 – Jun 44); I./KG 1 (Nov 43 – Mar 44); I./JG 3 (Mar-Jun 44); II./KG 1 (Apr-Jun 44); Wekusta 2 Ob.d.L. (AprJul, Aug-Sep 44); Stab, II./KG 3 (Jun-Jul 44); II./KG 76 (Aug 44 – Mar 45); III./KG 66 (Oct-Nov 44); II./KG 200 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); - 102 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Sonderkdo. Welter (Nov 44 – Jan 45); III./KG 76 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); 10./NJG 11 (Jan-Apr 45); Sonderkdo. Braunegg (Mar 45); 2./NAGr. 6 (Mar-Apr 45); 2./JG 7 (Apr 45). School Units: FFS C 16 then FFS B 16 (May 40 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Burg (to early 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 28/III (early 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 14/III (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Obstlt. Friedrich Morzik (Nov 39 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 7. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 1 (Dec 39 - ? ); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 3 (Mar 40 - ? ); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 40 (Oct 43 - ? ); Werft-Abt. 6/III (Dec 44); 3. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 6 (Oct 44 - ? ); Werft-Kp. 37/III (1942); Startbahnbauzug (B) 1/III (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.548-49 (13 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Burglengenfeld (GER) (49 11 54 N – 12 01 23 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Bavaria 20.5 km N of Regensburg; airfield located 1 km W of the village. History: A Notlandeplatz as early as 1927 and continued to serve in that capacity to the end of the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Büttelborn (GER) (49 52 50 N – 08 31 10 E) General: parking airfield for aircraft not in use (Abstellplatz) and satellite field (Schattenplatz) in Hesse 10 km WNW of Darmstadt and 2 km S of the village of Büttelborn. History: prepared and established during the late summer of 1944. Surface and Dimensions: leveled farm land measuring approx. 1000 x 320 meters (1100 x 350 yards). No paved runway. Infrastructure: none. Nearest rail connection at Dornheim, 2.4 km to the WSW. Dispersal: no organized dispersal. Remarks: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.84 (23 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Bützer (GER) (52 31 45 N – 12 17 10 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in SaxonyAnhalt 73 km W of Berlin, 30 km ESE of Stendal, 23.5 km NW of Brandenburg, 8-10 km S of Rathenow and 1.2 km SW of the village of Bützer. History: occasional wartime use as a glider training field. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1235 x 1000 meters (1350 x 1100 yards) and irregular in shape.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Infrastructure: had 2 hangar-type buildings in a small clearing just E of the field, with 3 smaller buildings adjacent to it. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.956 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Butzweilerhof (GER): see Köln-Butzweilerhof.

C Calau-Bronkow (GER) (c. 51 40 00 N – 13 57 07 E) ) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Brandenburg 28 km WSW of Cottbus, c. 9.5 km S of Calau and 2.5 km E of the village of Bronkow. History: a landing ground (Landeplatz) in 1938 that was upgraded to an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in 1939. Used as a practice field for trainers during the war years. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1100 x 1100 yards) and roughly circular. No paved runway. Infrastructure: reportedly had 3 small buildings on the N boundary. Nearest rail connection was 3.25 km E of the landing area. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 82 (Cottbus) (1939-41); 2./JG 102 (May-Jul 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Bronkow (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 3/IV (c. Feb – Apr 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 5/IV (1941); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 101/I (c. Nov 44 – Feb 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.550 (9 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Cammin (GER): see Dievenow. Camminer-Bodden (GER): see Dievenow. Canitz (GER): see Riesa-Canitz. Cannstatt (GER): see Bad Cannstatt. Celle-Wietzenbruch (GER) (52 35 40 N – 10 01 45 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 31.2 km NNE of Hannover in Lower Saxony and 4.8 km SW of Celle. History: construction began in spring 1933 and was completed in 1935, although training units began using it in mid-1934. By 1935 there were 5 large hangars and a building complex. It remained a training field until Sep 39, and during the war years operational units, especially transport units, arrived and departed after stays of varying duration. Fighter units assigned to air defense duties over the Reich

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 used Celle to refuel and rearm during the hectic air battles over Germany. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 825 meters (1,050 x 900 yards). Runway: in the center of the airfield was a large rectangular tarmac platform measuring 850 x 500 meters that was connected to the hangar aprons by three wide tarmac taxiways. The platform served as a runway area. A paved perimeter road surrounded the field. Otherwise, grass surface on light sandy soil. Infrastructure: fuel, ample refueling points, water, ammunition, communications and other amenities were available. There were 3 very large and 1 large hangar on the NW boundary and another very large hangar on the NE corner. Workshops, engine test-beds, motor pool garages, station HQ and admin buildings all ran along the NW side of the airfield while the main barrack area was behind the hangar at the NE corner. A munitions dump with some 9 bunkers at the NE corner. A branch rail line connected the N corner of the field. Dispersal: there were no shelters in Mar 44. Aircraft were parked in woods off the NE boundary and SW boundary. Defenses: not determined. Remarks: 1939-45: while Celle-Wietzenbruch was strafed a few times during 1944-45, it was never bombed and the buildings and installations survived the war relatively intact. 8 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 1 x Ju 52 destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109, 3 x Fw 190s and 1 x Ju 88 damaged. 19 Oct 44: Flugplatzkdo. Celle reported a strength of 157 military personnel and 270 civilian employees. 10 Apr 45: attacked by 40 Allied fighters – 12 Savoia transports, 2 He 111s and 3 trainers destroyed on the ground. 11 Apr 45: Celle taken without a fight by British forces. Operational Units: Aufkl.Gr. 324 (Apr-Oct 34); Aufkl.Gr. 323 (Nov 34 – Mar 35); Stab/KG z.b.V. 2 (c. Sep-Dec 39); I./St.G. 77 (Nov/Dec 39 – Feb 40); II./KG 54 (Mar-Apr 40); III./KG 54 (Mar 40); LuftdienstTeilkdo. 2/11 (Aug 40 – Dec 43); II./TG 2 (c. May-Jul 43); III./TG 1 (May-Oct 43, Apr-Sep 44); I./TG 4 (c. Feb-Mar 44); Behelfsbeleuchterstaffel 2 (Mar-Jun 44); I./TG 2 (Jun-Jul 44); I./KG 40 (Jul-Aug 44); II./JG 26 (Mar-Apr 45). School Units: twin-engined conversion school Celle-Wietzenbruch (Jul 34 – Sep 39); BFS Celle (1934 – c. Jul 37); FFS A 52 (Jan – Mar 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./KG 28 (May-Jun 41). Station Commands: Fliegerhorstkommandantur Celle (c.1935 – Jan 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 28/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Celle of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 22/XI Wesendorf (1944-45). - 105 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Kommandant: Maj. Kurt-Bertram von Döring (Jun 34 – Mar 35); Obstlt. Rudolf Ortner-Weigand (1939 - Mar 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. (o) 28/XI (spring 44 – 1945); elements of le.Flak-Abt. 755 (Feb 45); le.Hei.FlakBttr. 2/XI (May 44); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 22/XI (Nov 44); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 42/XI (1943-44); Stab, III./Fallschirmjäger-Ers.u.Ausb.Rgt. 3 (JanMar 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.93-95 (30 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Celle Hustedt-Waldkater (GER): see Hustedt. Celle-Scheuen (GER): see Scheuen. Cham (GER) (a.k.a. Cham-Michelsdorf) (49 13 50 N – 12 40 10 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Bavaria 46.5 km NE of Regensburg; airfield located 2.4 km WSW of Cham. History: used as a practice field for trainers during the war, and from October 1944 used by the Messerschmitt plant in Regensburg for the final assembly and acceptance flights for Bf 109 fighters. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1100 x 1000 meters (1200 x 1100 yards). No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: probably had refueling points on the N boundary. Infrastructure: there were 3 medium hangars with paved hangar aprons off the SW corner and connected to the landing area by taxiways. Probable workshop buildings in the NE corner, on the S boundary and off the W boundary. A small group of barracks was at the NE corner. Nearest rail connection at Cham. Operational Units: 3./NAGr. 13 (Apr-May 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 53 (Straubing) (1939); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 13 later FFS A/B 13 (Pilsen); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 121 then FFS A 121 (Straubing) (1940-45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Cham (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 50/XIII (Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 30/XIII (Apr 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 18/XII Straubing (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 34/VII Straubing (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.86 (7 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Chemnitz (GER) (50 50 N – 12 55 E) Lw. City Garrison and Station Units (on various dates – specific airfield not identified): Stab/Flak-Rgt. 300(v) (1943)?; Heimat-Flak-Battrn. 209/IV, 210/IV, 211/IV, 231/IV (1944); Flieger-Ers.Btl. VI (1945); Kraftfahr-Ausbildungs-Abt. d.Lw. 4 (c.1941-44); Ersatz-Btl. für Lw.Helferinnen (1945). Chemnitz (GER) (50 48 35 N – 12 53 20 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Saxony 68 km SE of Leipzig, 62 km WSW of Dresden and 4 km SW of Chemnitz. History: listed in 1927 as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). By 1932, upgraded to a secondary airport (Flughafen II). Taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1939 and used for glider and flight training. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface on clay sub-soil measuring approx. 1000 x 730 meters (1100 x 800 yards) with an irregular shape. No paved runway. Equipped with perimeter lighting along the W boundary. Infrastructure: had 1 medium hangar with a paved apron and 2 workshops off the E boundary. A small group of station buildings were also on the E boundary and included admin offices, stores and a flight control building. The nearest rail connection was in Chemnitz. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Remarks: the Chemnitz marshaling yards were very heavily bombed in 1945 but the airfield was apparently left untouched. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 7 (Plauen). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 15/IV (1941, Feb 43 – Mar 44?). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.551 (13 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Chemnitz-Euba (GER) (50 49 40 N – 13 00 10 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Saxony 68 km SE of Leipzig, 7 km E of Chemnitz and 1.6 km SW of the village of Euba. History: used mainly for glider training to 1943. From 1943 used by the Erla concern to test fly Bf 109 fighters, and from mid-1944 by a fighter training Staffel. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1280 x 550 meters (1400 x 600 yards) with an irregular shape. Infrastructure: had a small hangar-type building off the NW corner. Nearest rail connection in Chemnitz. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: 4./JG 110 (May 44 – Feb 45). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.552 (13 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Clausheide (GER): see Klausheide. Cloppenburg (GER): see Varrelbusch. Coburg (GER) (a.k.a. Coburg-Brandsteinsebene) (50 15 40 N – 10 59 45 E) General: airfield (Flugplatz) in Bavaria 57 km ENE of Schweinfurt and 41 km N of Bamberg; located 2.5 km E of the city. History: 1928

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). Surface and Dimensions: good grass surface, irregular in shape and measuring approx. 550 x 730 meters (600 x 800 yards). Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar on the N boundary. Operational Units: Erprobungskdo. 40 (Oct/Nov 44 – Apr 45); Erprobungskdo. 41 (Jan 45 - ? ). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Kdo.(o) Coburg (1944-45); 20.(s.Flum.Leit)/Ln.-Rgt. 237 (Mendhausen) (Sep 44 – Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.584-638 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Coesfeld (GER) (51 54 50 N – 07 07 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 33 km W of Münster and 4 km (or 6 km?) SW of Coesfeld. History: used little if at all until fall 1944 when fighters began operating from Coesfeld. Dimensions: approx. 825 x 320 meters (900 x 350 yards). Runway: grass surface that was unserviceable in wet weather. Infrastructure: two buildings in a small woods off the NE corner may have served as hangars and workshops. Accommodations were probably obtained in nearby villages. Nearest rail connection in Coesfeld. Dispersal: no organized dispersal areas. Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Coesfeld-Velen (GER) (51 53 25 N – 07 03 00 E). Dummy 17 km WNW of Dülmen, 9.7 km SW of Coesfeld and 4 km E of Velen. Mock-up included a relatively large landing area, a replicated hangar and built-up area with pretend streets, and a number of sham aircraft parked in various places. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.606 (1944)] Remarks: 1943-45: city bombed several times but no attacks specifically on the airfield have been identified. 24 Mar 45: airfield ordered immediately evacuated and destroyed. Operational Units: 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 10 (May-Mar 40)? Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 134. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Oct 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.98 (22 Jan 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Cosel (GER) (a.k.a. Kedzierzyn-Kozle; Kozle) (c. 50 20 06 N – 18 09 55 E) General: airfield (Flugplatz) in Silesia 37 km WNW of Gleiwitz (Gliwice). History: 1939 listed as an operational airfield

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (Einsatzhafen II). Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Remarks: 17-18 Mar 45: the last German defenders withdrawn from Cosel. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Jagdfliegerführer Oberschlesien (Sep 43 – Jan 45); Koflug 4/VIII (Feb 43 – Dec 44); Heimat-Flak-Abt. 55/VIII (Heydebreck, 1944-45); Flak-Battr. z.b.V. 10706 (1944-45); Heimat-Flak-Battrn. 212/VIII, 213/VIII, 214/VIII; Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 2/VIII (1944-45); Stab and I.(Ln.Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 219 (Sep 44 – Feb 45); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 229 (Sep 44 – c.Feb 45); 9.(Ers.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 8 (Nov 41); 19. (Flum.Ers.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 8 (Aug 42); Ln.-Fernsprecheru.Fernschreiber-Betr.Pers.Kp. 315 (Jan 42). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Cottbus (GER) (51 46 15 N – 14 18 20 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Brandenburg 104 km SSE of Berlin and located on the NW outskirts of the city of Cottbus. History: listed in 1927 as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). By 1932 it had been upgraded to a first class airport (Flughafen I). Established as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935 and thereafter became an important center for training activity and home station to pre-war reconnaissance and bomber units. From August 1941 it was also a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for manufacturing the 4-engine Fw 200 “Condor”. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1100 x 1100 yards) and roughly pentagonal in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface with 3 intersecting runways: (a) 1100 meters (1200 yards) aligned NW/SE; (b) 825 meters (900 yards) aligned NE/SW; (c) 825 meters (900 yards) aligned E/W. Paved taxiways connected the ends of the runways with the hangar and building areas. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points along the S boundary, SE corner and on the W boundary. Infrastructure: there were 7 hangars fronted by paved aprons along the N side of the field along with several workshop and repair shop buildings and an engine test bed facility. The flight control building was on the W end of hangar row. The main airfield buildings were in the woods off the NW corner and included admin offices, extensive barrack accommodations, messes, officers’ quarters, etc. A branch rail line served the E, S and W boundaries of the field. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. - 109 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 11 Apr 44: airfield and factory bombed 17 B-17 Fortresses. 29 May 44: airfield and factory bombed 48 B-17 Fortresses. 31 May 44: bombed – 1 x Si 204 from FFS B 10 destroyed on the ground. 15 Feb 45: Cottbus marshaling yards bombed by 435 B-17s. 22 Apr 45: Cottbus taken by Soviet forces. Operational Units: 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 114 (Apr 34 – Dec 35); Aufkl.Gr. 212 (Apr 36 – Sep 37); Aufkl.Gr. 52 (Oct 37 – Oct 38); Stab, I./KG 252 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); II./LG 1 (Mar 39); I./KG 2 (Oct 39); Stab, I./St.G. 2 (Jun 41); 9./St.G. 1 (Jun 41); III./TG 4 (Jul 44); I./SG 1 (Jan-Feb 45); I./TG 3 (Jan-Feb 45); Stab, II., III./SG 77 (Feb-Mar 45); 10.(Pz)/SG 77 (Feb 45); I./JG 6 (Feb 45). School Units: Schule/FAR 82 (Sep 39 – Sep 41); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 3 (Guben). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 269/III (1944-45)? Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Obstlt. Ernst Bonatz (1936 - 1 Mar 37); Maj. Oskar Dinort (1 May 39 - Aug 39); Obstlt. Josef Büsges (Aug 41 - 31 Jul 42?). Lw. Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): part of Stab/Luftflotte 6 (Mar-Apr 45); Koflug Cottbus (Jul 39 - Mar 41); Koflug 3/IV (Apr 41 – Feb 43); Koflug 11/VI (fall 44 – Apr 45?); Flugh.Betr.Kp. Cottbus; Werft-Abt. 106/IV (fall 44 – Jan 45); Stab/Flak-Sturm-Rgt. 2 (mot.) (1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 107(o) (1945); part of gem.Flak-Abt. 373 (Eisb.) (1945); 6./Ln.Flugmelde-Rgt. 93 (C-Willmersdorf, 1943 – Sep 44); 18./Ln.Flugmelde-Rgt. 93 (Jan 45); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 353 (Oct 44 – Feb 45); 7. (Borneo III)/Ln.-Flugmelde-Abt. (E) z.b.V. 21 ( ? - Feb 45); elements of Flugmelde-Funk-Kp. z.b.V. 21 (Mar 45); Fluko Cottbus; Lw.-Bau-Btl. Cottbus (1939-40); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Cottbus; Lw.Lazarett 16/XI ( ? – Jan 45?). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.553-54 (3 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Crailsheim (GER) (49 08 15 N – 10 02 40 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Baden-Württemberg 76 km NE of Stuttgart; airfield 2 km W of the town. History: classified as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in 1927. The Luftwaffe began constructing a large air base here in 1935 and by 1 October 1937 there were 6 hangars including a big repair hangar, all of these with concrete aprons and servicing hardstands in front of them, an air traffic control building, a motor pool and garages, a large fire department, a block of large barrack buildings, a second - 110 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 barrack block for flight school students, a dispensary, a station HQ building, and a housing area with homes for the families of station personnel. A railway line ran directly behind the repair hangar and motor pool. Officially established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. It served almost exclusively as a flight training station right up to the end of the war. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 825 meters (1100 x 900 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface that tended to be unserviceable in wet weather. No paved runway, but there were two large paved starting platforms at the E and W ends of the landing area. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points with adjacent storage tanks were at the W end of the servicing hardstands in front of the hangars. The station munitions dump was off the W boundary. Infrastructure: see above under History. Dispersal: there were 4 dispersal areas – Northwest, Northwest (Remote), Northwest (Taxi Track) and South with a total of 2 aircraft shelters and 3 aircraft hardstands. Most aircraft were parked along taxi tracks and around the perimeter of the landing area. Defenses: details on airfield Flak positions and emplacements not found. Remarks: 13 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 2 x Bf 110s and 2 x Me 323s destroyed, plus 2 x Me 323s damaged. 24 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – 3 x Fw 58 C-2s from FFS A 43 destroyed or damaged (from incomplete German sources). According to VIII Fighter Command sources, its P51s claimed 3 x Bf 110s, 2 x Ju 88s, 1 x Ju 52 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 4 x Bf 110s and 1 x Ju 52 damaged. 21 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Fw 190s and 1 x W 34 damaged. 22 Feb 45: strafed – 3 x Bücker and Klemm trainers destroyed, 6 x Bü 181 and 1 x Kl 35 damaged. (German report) 11 Mar 45: runway and landing area cratered – airfield unserviceable for at least 2 days. (German report) 7 Apr 45: Crailsheim airfield taken by U.S. forces (10th Armored Div.), briefly used by 60 C-47s to bring in supplies and fly out wounded, given up the night of 11 April due to stiff German resistance and Luftwaffe air attacks on the field, and finally retaken on 22 April. The town ended the war badly damaged but the airfield had suffered relatively little and all but a couple of hangars were intact. Operational Units: I./KG 76 (Oct-Dec 39); Stab, I./ZG 26 (Jan-Mar 40); Aufkl.Gr. (H) 156 (Feb-Apr 40); Panzerjägerstaffeln Bü 181 (Apr 45)? - 111 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: FFS A/B Crailshein (elementary flight school Crailsheim) (Aug 37 – Mar 39); Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 43 (1939-40); Schule/FAR 43 (Apr – Sep 39 and Sep 40 –Sep 41), FFS A/B 43 (Oct 41 – Oct 43) then FFS A 43 (Oct 43 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Crailsheim (c. 1938 – Jan 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 9/VII (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 6/VII (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Oberst Hans Poetsch ( ? - Oct 39); Obstlt. Albert Schlack (18 Oct 40 - 13 Dec 42). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 6/VII (1944-45); one Zug from Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 26/VII (1944-45); Lw.Bau-Btl. 16/XIII (Apr 40); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 125/VII (1944-45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 200/VI (Feb 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.87-89 (14 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Cronburg (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Gelnhausen airfield - see there. Crössinsee (GER): see Märkisch-Friedland. Cuxhaven (GER) (a.k.a. Cuxhaven-Altenwalde) (53 49 57 N – 08 38 00 E) General: seaplane anchorage in Lower Saxony 36 km N of Bremerhaven. History: no Luftwaffe units known to have ever been stationed there. It apparently was no more than a safe harbor stopover with no facilities. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

D Dabern (GER): see Gahro. Dahl (GER) (a.k.a. Paderborn-Goldgrund) (51 42 50 N – 08 49 35 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 5.6 km NE of Paderborn airfield, 4.8 km ESE of Paderborn and 2.4 km NW of Dahl. History: used as a dummy (Scheinflugplatz) during 1940-41. Believed to have been brought to operational status in fall 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1325 x 870 meters (1,450 x 950 yards. Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: no facilities or buildings. Nearest rail connection at Paderborn. Dispersal: aircraft parking on the edge of small woods at the SE and SW boundaries. Defenses: unknown.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Remarks: Feb 45: listed as still operational. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.105 (16 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Damm (GER): see Jüterbog-Damm. Dammen (GER) (a.k.a. Damno) (c. 54 31 N – 17 19 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania 20 km NE of Stolp (Slupsk). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe wartime use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dannenberg (GER) (52 46 30 N – 13 56 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Brandenburg 48 km NE of Berlin and 7 km SW of Bad Freienwalde between the villages of Dannenberg and Platzfelde. History: 1927 listed as a Notlandeplatz. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Danzig (GER) (54 21 07 N – 18 38 19 E) General: Luftwaffe units stationed in and around this historic port city but not identifiable with a specific airfield. Lw. Garrison Units (on various dates): Stab/12. Flak-Div. (Jan-Feb 45); Stab/15. Flak-Brig. (Dec 44 – Jan/Feb 45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 62 (as Flakgruppe Westpreussen) (Apr 41 – Oct 44); II./Flak-Rgt. 4 (gem. mot.) (1945); I./Flak-Rgt. 111 (gem. mot.) (1945); gem.Flak-Abt. 114(v) (c. Oct 43 – 1945); gem.Flak-Abt. 194(v) (Oct 40 – May 44); gem.Flak-Abt. 214(v) (Feb-Mar 45); schw.Flak-Abt. 232(o) (1940); schw.Flak-Abt. 311(v) (1942-43); Flakscheinw.Abt. 318(v) (Aug-Sep 43); part of Flakscheinw.Abt. 378(v) (1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 387(o) (1943-45); I./Flak-Rgt. 411 (gem. mot.) (1945); 8./le.Flak-Abt. 762(o) (Aug-Sep 44); le.Flak-Abt. 877(v) (1942 – Jul 44); 4./le.FlakAbt. 886(o) (Aug-Sep 44); Luftsperr-Abt. 961(o) (Dec 43 – Jan 44); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 218/I (1943-45); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 219/I (1943-45); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 235/I (1943-45); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 236/I (1943-45); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 237/I (1943-45); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 238/I (1943-45); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 249/I (1943-45); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 20 (D-Zoppot, 1945); Luftschutz-Kp. z.b.V. 2/I (1944-45); Nebel-Kp. d.Lw. 27 (1943-45); Stab I.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 261 (Sep 44 – Feb 45)?; IV. (Ausb./Ln.Helferinnen)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 1 (c.May 42 - ? ); Ln.Betr.Kp. 132 (Jan-Feb 45); Flugmelde-Reserve-Kp. 12/I (1940); Stab

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 and 1./Lw.-Bau-Btl. 2/I (1940); Kfz.Werkstattzug d.Lw. 122/I (194445); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 118/XI (Feb 45); elements of Lw.-Berge-Btl. II (Feb-Mar 45); Flugzeug-Bergungstrupp 5/XI (May 41); FlugzeugBergungstrupp 12/XI (May 41); Auffanglager d.Lw. Danzig (Jan 45). Danzig-Langfuhr (GER) (a.k.a. Gdansk-Wrzeszcz) (54 23 40 N – 18 36 10 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 5.5 km NW of Danzig (Gdansk) in the former West Prussia and immediately N of the village of Langfuhr, which was a suburb of Danzig. History: listed as a commercial airport (Verkehrsflughafen) in 1939 and Lufthansa continued to use Langfuhr for commercial flights during the war. Taken over by the Luftwaffe during the Sep 39 attack on Poland. Used for elementary flight training until late 1944/early 1945 when it became populated by front units pulling back from farther east. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1100 x 1100 yards) and roughly circular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface on a gravel foundation. No paved runway. A perimeter road encircled the landing area. Equipped with a beam approach system and the necessary illumination and navigation aids for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: the refueling point was probably in from of the large triple-bay hangar on the S side of the field. Infrastructure: had 1 large triple-bay hangar, 1 large flight hangar, 1 medium flight hangar and 3 small flight hangars in a curving row along the S boundary and all fronted with paved aprons and taxiways that projected out toward the center of the landing area. Station buildings and the main block of barracks were between the hangars at the center of the S boundary, while several other groups of barracks and accommodation huts were in Langfuhr, 1.2 km E of the airfield and 2 km ESE of the airfield, although not all of these were used by airfield personnel. Railway connections were along the S, SW and E sides of the field. Dispersal: no organized dispersal areas. Aircraft were parked in a field connected to the N boundary by a taxiway (Apr 44). Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 11 Jul 42: Danzig city bombed by 44 RAF Lancasters but the airfield is not believed to have been hit. 9 Oct 43: Danzig port area bombed by 150 B-17 Fortresses and B-24 Liberators. 30 Mar 45: Danzig taken by Soviet forces. Operational Units: II./ZG 1 (Sep 39); I.(Stuka)/Trägergruppe 186 (Sep 39); II./Fliegerzielgeschwader 1 (c. May-Sep 44); - 114 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 4./Fliegerzielgeschwader 1 (May 44); 6. Minensuchstaffel (Sep 44 – Mar 45); I., IV./JG 51 (Jan-Mar 45); I./NJG 100 (Jan-Feb 45); 1., 2./NAGr. 4 (Mar 45); Nahaufkl.St. 11./12 (Mar 45). School Units: FFS A/B 6 (c. Oct 39 – Sep 40); Schule/FAR 52 then FFS A/B 52 (Sep 40 – Jan 45); Gasschutzschule 1 d.Lw. (1944-45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./Minensuchgruppe 1 (1944 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Danzig (1939-41); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 220/I (Oct 44 – Mar 45)? Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Oberst Hermann Dahlmann (Oct 39 Mar 41). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug 2/I (1945); Werft-Abt. 13/I (Dec 44); Transport-Begleit-Kp. d.Lw. 2/I (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.559-62 (Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dargelin (GER) (54 00 52 N – 13 21 18 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania 8.5 km S of Greifswald and 11 km SW of Greifswald airfield. Possibly an alternative or satellite field (Ausweichflugplatz) for Greifswald. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Darmstadt (GER) (49 52 39 N – 08 39 06 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfields, in the city or nearby – not complete): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/16. Fliegerdivision (D-Pfungstadt, Mar 45); Stab/Jagdfliegerführer Mittelrhein (Cambrai Kaserne, Jan-Mar 45); Nachtjagdraumführer 103 (Jul 42 – Dec 43); Jagdabschnittsführer Mittelrhein (Mar 44 - Jan 45). Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: Stab/IV. Flakkorps (D-Ludwigshöhe, Mar 45); Luftverteidungskdo. 5 (? – Aug 41); Stab/5. Flak-Div. (Sep 41 – c.Dec 42); Stab/21. Flak-Div. (D-Marienhöhe, Mar 43 – Feb 45); Stab/Flak-Brig. VI (1941/42 – Feb 43). Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flakscheinwerfer-Rgt. 109(o) (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Darmstadt) (Oct 41 – Mar 45); Stab/Flakscheinwerfer-Rgt. 119(o) (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Darmstadt) (1943-45)?; Stab/Flakscheinwerfer-Rgt. 139(o) (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Darmstadt) (Apr 42 – Jul 44). Flak-Abt.: schw.905(o); le.987(o).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 129(o); 200(o); 228(o); 308(v); 349(o)?; 399(o); 499(o); 908(o). Luftsperr-Abt.: 107(o). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 32 (Jan-Jun 40); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 33 (1942 – Jan 45); Sprengkommando d.Lw. 1/XII. Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 213 (c.Apr 43 – Jan 44); I.(Ln.Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 213 (c.Apr 43 – Jan 44); Stab II. (Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 213 (c.Apr-Oct 43); 6.(Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 213 (JanFeb 45); Stab II./Ln.-Rgt. 215 (1944 – Aug 44); Stab III./Ln.-Rgt. 215 (1944 – Aug 44); Stab IV.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 233 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); 10.(Funkh.)/Ln.-Rgt. 351 (Oct 44 – Mar 45); 7.(Ers.)/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 7 (Mar 45); Ln.-Abt. 125 (Sep 41 – Feb 43); Ln.-Abt. 141 (Mar 43 – Feb 45); Ln.-Abt. Jagdfliegerführer Mittelrhein (Feb 45). Medical Services (Sanitätsdienste): Lw.-San.Abt. 13/VII. Darmstadt-Stadt (GER) (49 52 00 N – 08 40 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Hesse 2 km SE of the city of Darmstadt. History: listed as a minor airport (Flughafen) in 1927. Used by Luftwaffe reserve training units before the war and by a basic training unit during the first 2 or 3 years of the war. Aerial photos taken in Sep 44 showed the field completely taken over by Flak positions and a signals station. Surface and Dimensions: light turf on sandy sub-soil measuring approx. 775 x 730 meters (850 x 800 yards). Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar and admin building in the SW corner. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 33 (1939-41). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.451 (12 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Darmstadt-Griesheim (GER) (49 51 10 N – 08 35 20 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Hesse 5 km WSW of the city of Darmstadt and 2.4 km SE of the village of Griesheim. History: said to be Germany’s first airfield and flight school, dating from 1908. Listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz) in 1927, and in 1932 as a secondary airport (Flughafen II). It was the main office and glider research facility of DFS (Deutsches Forschungsinstitut für Segelflugwesen) until 1943. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 1050 meters (1200 x 1150 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface with an extension off the W boundary completed in 1944. There were no paved runways in Oct 43, but had 3 intersecting narrow surfaced strips measuring some 460

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 meters (500 yards) that projected into the landing area from the N side. German sources state that it had 4 paved runways. Fuel and Ammunition: both were available with the station ammunition dump probably in the woods approx. 1.6 km SSW of the landing area. Infrastructure: had 3 medium hangars on the N boundary and 1 medium hangar off the NE corner. All 4 had a concrete hangar apron. Behind the hangars on the N boundary were extensive workshops belonging to the DFS glider research institute. Extensive barrack accommodations were off the N boundary in the vicinity of the DFS institute, while station HQ, admin buildings, offices, stores buildings and sheds were off the NE boundary. Nearest rail connection in Griesheim village. Dispersal: there were 4+ open aircraft shelters along the perimeter at the SE corner in Oct 43. Defenses: 3 light Flak positions in Oct 43, one of these emplaced in Flak towers. Remarks: 10/11 Apr 43: bombed by RAF (target Frankfurt) – 3,000 incendary bombs hit the hangars and buildings causing considerable damage. 24 Dec 44: airfield bombed by 189 B-17 Fortresses. 23 Mar 45: airfield ordered evacuated and destroyed. 25 Mar 45: Darmstadt occupied by U.S. 3rd Army forces. Operational Units: 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 14 (Nov 39); Stab, I./ZG 2 (MarJun 40); II./JG 3 (Feb-May 41); 4./Gruppe Süd (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (Aug 44); 2./NJG 11 (Sep 44 – Jan 45); Stab/JG 53 (Sep-Oct 44); part of III./JG 300 (Oct 44); Stab, I., III./JG 4 (Nov 44 – Jan 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 1./Erg.JGr. Süd (Apr – Oct 42). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Darmstadt (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 25/XII (6 Apr 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 1/XII (c.Jan 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/XII Mannheim-Sandhofen (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. Darmstadt-Griesheim of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 25/VII Rhein-Main (Jun 44 - ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/4. Jagddivision (Sep 44); two Züge of 143. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Aug 44); 3./le.FlakAbt. 715 (Aug 44 – Mar 45); Luftschutz-Rgt. z.b.V. 6 (Jun 43 – Sep 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 115/XIII (1944). On c. 1 Jan 45: Werft-Abt.(v) 103/XII; Werkstattwagenzug (Fl) 3/XIV; Kdr.d.Flak-Instandsetzung 104/XII; Flak-Sondergerätwerkstatt 103/VII; Ln.-Abt. 141; Hilfslufttanklager. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.90-94 (8 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 117 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Deckenpfronn (GER) (48 38 20 N – 08 49 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Baden-Württemberg 29 km WSW of Stuttgart and 1.6 km SSW of Deckenpfronn. History: Do 17 reconnaissance aircraft dispersed here at the outbreak of war and then believed to have been a glider training field. From spring 1944, used as a parking field (Abstellplatz) and a satellite (Schattenplatz) for aircraft belonging to units based at Böblingen. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1145 x 365 meters (1250 x 400 yards). No paved runway. Infrastructure: none. Remarks: none. Operational Units: 7.(F)/LG 2 (Sep 39 - ?). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/VII Böblingen (Dec 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.95 (9 Jan 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dedelstorf (GER) (52 42 45 N – 10 30 20 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Lower Saxony 50 km N of Braunschweig and 5.2 km N of the village of Dedelstorf. History: construction began in 1935 and was carried out in two phases, the second of which ended in March 1939. Wartime use to October 1943 was primarily by combat units engaged in training, especially those making used of the bombing range at Ehra-Lessin/25 km S of Dedelstorf, paratroops (Fallschirmjäger) training and as an NSFK glider school. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 1370 meters (1,000 x 1,500 yards). Runway: grass surface on clay soil. Infrastructure: fuel, oil, water and communications were available. 1 medium hangar with a paved apron, separate workshops near the hangar, motor pool 1 km to the NE in the area occupied by the station barracks, messes, dispensary, supply and admin buildings. The flying control building (Flugleitung) was a few meters NW of the hangar and there was a small group of huts off the SW corner of the landing area. A munitions dump was sited off the NW boundary. Rail access along the E and N boundaries. Dispersal: a total of 33 open concrete-walled blast bays had been built in the woods off the NW and SW corners of the airfield as of April 1944. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 4 Aug 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 5 x Ju 88s and 1 x Me 410 destroyed, plus 1 x Ju 88 damaged.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 1945: a concrete runway was under construction using Yugoslav and Italian POWs from Stalag X D at Wietzendorf, this intended for use by jet fighters. 4 Apr 45: bombed by 13 B-17 Fortresses as a secondary target. Apr 45: airfield partially demolished by German troops at the beginning of April prior to being abandoned. 14 Apr 45: Dedelstorf taken by U.S. forces. Operational Units: I./KG 55 (Aug-Sep 39); IV.(Stuka)/LG 1 (Dec 39 – Apr 40); II./KG 200 (Mar-Nov 44); I./KG 66 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); 14./KG 200 (Dec 44); I./JG 11 (Nov-Dec 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stab and 1.St. Erg.Gr./Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (Oct 43 – 1944); FliegerSonderkdo. Ob.d.L. Dedelstorf (1943-44); Stab and 15./SG 151 (Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. B 87/XI (1943 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Dedelstorf of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 22/XI Wesendorf (194445). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 77 (Nov 44 - ? ); Frontfliegersammelgruppe Dedelstorf (Feb 44)?; Sonderkdo. (LP)/Ob.d.L. (May 44); Prüfungslager der Luftwaffe Dedelstorf. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.106-08 (6 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Deep (land and sea) (GER) (54 08 20 N – 15 17 00 E) General: airfield and seaplane station in Pomerania 22 km WSW of Kolberg (Kolobrzeg) near the present-day village of Mrówcze Gory on the Baltic coast, and 4 km W of Kamp airfield. History: existed at least since 1938. Airfield used mainly by target-towing aircraft in support of the Flakschiessplatz (Antiaircraft gunnery range) located there. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Feld-FlakartillerieSchule 15 (Mitte) (1943). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.968 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Deilinghofen (GER) (51 23 10 N – 07 47 55 E) General: emergency landing ground and satellite airfield (Notlandeplatz and Ausweichflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 24 km SE of Dortmund, 6-4 km E of Iserlohn and on the NW edge of Deilinghofen. History: no information on when built but it was listed as operational in Oct 43 and in use in September 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 1000 meters (1,400 x 1,100 yards). Runway: rough grass surface. Infrastructure: there were 2 small buildings off the S corner which were probably used as workshops. Nearest rail - 119 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 connection at Hemmer 2 km W of the field. Dispersal: parking in woods off the SW and W boundaries. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 13 Apr 45: captured by U.S. forces. Operational Units: Nahaufkl.St. 13./14 (Mar 45). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates): Werft-Abt. Deilinghofen (Dec 44); 1./le.Flak-Abt. 737 (Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.109-10 (16 Sep 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Deiningen (GER) (48 53 00 N – 10 34 10 E) General: airfield (Flugplatz) 60 km NNW of Augsburg in Bavaria, 6.5 km ENE of Nordlingen and 1.6 km N of Deiningen village. History: ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. 1939 listed as an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I). Used as a practice field for trainers during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 780 meters (1150 x 850 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface subject to flooding in wet weather. Had 1 concrete runway measuring approx. 775 x 80 meters (850 x 90 yards) and aligned ENE/WSW. Two unsurfaced starting platforms were at each end of the runway and these offered a total take-off/landing run of approx. 1185 meters (1300 yards). A wide taxi track ran from the W end of the runway to the SW corner of the airfield. The entire airfield was surrounded by a narrow perimeter road. The runway had a permanent illumination system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the S boundary and at the W end of the runway. Infrastructure: a small hangar was off the S boundary and separate workshop buildings were S of the hangar and off the SW corner. A small barrack complex was located off the S boundary and there were additional barrack huts in the woods to the SE. Nearest rail connection was in Deiningen. Dispersal: had 3 very large “Dutch barn”–type aircraft shelters off the N boundary and 3 more off the S boundary. Defenses: Remarks: 5 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 2 x Bf 110s destroyed and 1 more damaged. 3 Oct 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x Bf 110 destroyed. 16 Jan 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x Me 163 destroyed, plus 3 x Ju 88s damaged.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 19 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 190 destroyed plus another damaged. 21 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Ju 88 destroyed, plus 1 x Fw 190, 2 x Me 410s, 2 x Fw 200s and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. According to German reports, 2 x Bf 109, 1 x W 34 and 1 x Si 204 were damaged. 18 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Bf 109s, 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109 and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 43, FFS A/B 43 then FFS A 43 (Crailsheim); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 13 then FFS B 13 (Roth) (Feb 42 – Jun 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Deiningen (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 10/XIII (Mar-Apr 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 233/VII (Nov-Dec 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 28/VII (19 Jan 45 - ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Flgh.Betr.Pers.Zug z.b.V. 130 (Oct-Dec 44); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 4/XIII (Apr 40). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.96-97 (7 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Delitzsch (GER) (a.k.a. Delitzsch-Beerendorf) (51 32 30 N – 12 04 15 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 23.5 km NNW of Leipzig in Saxony, 5 km ENE of Delitzsch and 2 km W of the village of Spröda. History: built in the late 1930’s and used as a practice field for trainers and as a Luftpark depot. Also a satellite field (Abstellplatz and Schattenplatz) for Erla Maschinenwerke Leipzig which additionally did some final Bf 109 assembly work there during the first half of 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1145 meters (1300 x 1250 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface in good condition. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were probably at the two ends of the hangars at the SE corner. Infrastructure: there were 2 very large and 1 large flight hangars and 1 repair hangar at the SE corner, all with paved aprons. Workshoptype buildings were behind the hangars and the base motor pool and garages were off the NE corner. A group of 4 small storage buildings serviced by railway sidings was SE of the hangars. A barracks complex was located 1.6 km ESE of the airfield and another barracks complex was off the NE corner. The Halle-Delitzsch-Torgau rail line served the storage buildings on the SE corner. - 121 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: there were two – Northeast and Northwest - where aircraft parked in the open. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 16 Aug 44: airfield bombed by 102 B-17 Fortresses. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 33 (Altenburg) (1942-43); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 9 then FFS B 9 (Pretzsch) (Nov 42 – Sep 44). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Delitzsch-Beerendorf (to Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 53/IV (Feb 43 – Mar 44)?; Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 34/III Pretzsch (Apr 44 - 1945). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Leo Vessel (23 Apr 42 - 17 Mar 43); Oberst Konrad Frege (17 Mar 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftpark Delitzsch (later Luftpark 1/IV) (1938/39-45?). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.563-64 (19 Aug 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Delmenhorst (GER) (a.k.a. Delmenhorst-Adelheide) (53 00 30 N – 08 35 15 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 16 km WSW of Bremen in Lower Saxony and 6 km SSW of Delmenhorst. History: dates from 1934 when the NSFK began using it for glider training. The Luftwaffe began building the air base in April 1935 as one of the largest and best equipped in Germany and was considered a model station. Ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936 and served as a Leithorst (controlling airfield) during the early part of the war. Prewar home station of III./KG 27 Boelcke and its predecessors. From March 1941 factory airfield (Industriehafen) for Wesser Flugzeugbau Bremen where final assembly work on new Ju 87 Stukas was carried out, and for Focke-Wulf Bremen for the fabrication of prototype and experimental aircraft and weapon systems and the production and testing of the Fa 223 Drache twin-rotor helicopter. At peak in 194344, some 2,000 workers were billeted on the airfield, half of them foreign forced laborers. Air defense fighter units began using Delmenhorst in 1941 and numerous aircraft blast shelters were subsequently built in adjoining woods. Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 1370 meters (1,500 x 1,500 yards). Work to extend the landing area to the W were taken up in 1941 but abandoned before completion. Runway: grass surface on marshy ground that resulted in drainage problems and periods of unserviceability.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Infrastructure: fuel, oil, water, ammunition and communications all available. There were 9 hangars along the N boundary, including 1 mammoth hangar and a repair hangar, extensive storage sheds and a motor pool. Numerous barrack blocks, offices, supply buildings, gym, base swimming pool, dispensary and other support facilities were mostly located in an area to the rear of the hangars. Flying control and tower (Flugleitung) was sited on the N boundary of the field. A branch rail line ran to the hangar area and then along the W boundary to the munitions dump. Dispersal: 39 open aircraft shelters were built in 1941 and mainly located in woods off the SW corner (as of Mar 44). Defenses: at least 2 heavy Flak positions 1.5 to 2 km from the NE and SW corners of the airfield. Light Flak was also present but the number of positions unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Delmenhorst-Henstedt (Horstedt?) (GER) (52 57 10 N – 08 31 10 E). Dummy 13.8 km SSW of Delmenhorst city and 7.3 km SW of Delmenhorst airfield. Mock-up included 5 dummy hangars, barracks, roads and rows of lights. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.608 (1944)] Remarks: 1940-45: the airfield was only bombed a few times during the war and what little damage occurred was quickly repaired. 19 Apr 45: Delmenhorst taken intact by the British 51st Highland Div. Operational Units: I./KG 254 (Apr-Sep 36); III./KG 157 (Apr 37 – Apr 39); III./KG 27 (May-Aug 39); Stab, II./KG 1 (Oct 39); II./KG 27 (Oct 39 – May 40); I./KG 54 (Nov 39 – Feb 40); II./KG 4 (Feb 40); I./St.G. 1 (Mar-Apr 40); I./LG 1 (May 40); III./KG 4 (May-Jun 40); 6./JG 27 (Jul 40); II./JG 54 (Dec 40 – Jan 41); Stab, I./JG 6 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); III./JG 26 (Mar 45); NSGr. 20 (Apr 45). Station Commands: Fliegerhorst Delmenhorst (1935-41); Flgh.Stüpu.Kdo. 5/XI (Apr 41); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 23/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Dr. Otto Sommer (c 1 May 39 - 30 Jun 39). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Delmenhorst (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 14/XI (Apr 41 – Jan 42); Koflug 25/XI (Sep 41 – Jan 43); Koflug 9/XI (Feb 43 – Apr 45); 7. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 27 (May 39 - ? ); 8. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 27 (May 39 - ? ); I./Flak-Rgt. 46 (Jun 42); part of schw.Flak-Abt. 263 (Eisb.) (mid-1942). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.111-15 (10 Feb 44 updated to 6 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Der Stüh (GER): see Stüh. - 123 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Dessau (GER) (51 50 07 N – 12 13 55 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: Stab/Flak-Brig. I (Dec 40 – Mar 41); Stab/2. Flak-Brig. (Mar 44 – c.Jan 45). Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 26 (Oct 36 – c.Nov 38); Stab/FlakRgt. 43 (as Flakgruppe Dessau, c. Nov 38 – Sep 41?); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 143 (as Flakgruppe Dessau, Mar 44 – 1945). Flak-Abt.: I./Flak-Rgt. 26 (Oct 36 – Nov 38); II./Flak-Rgt. 26 (Oct 36 – Nov 38); 4.(le.) Battr. II./Flak-Rgt. 38 (Aug 38); II./Flak-Rgt. 43 (c. Nov 38 – Aug 39); III./Flak-Rgt. 43 (c. Nov 38 – Aug 39); 6./s.FlakAbt. 132 (Jul-Sep 44); part of s.Flak-Abt. 174 (Apr 44 – 1945); 2./s.Flak-Abt. 176 (Mar 44 – 1945); 1., 3./s.Flak-Abt. 185 (Jul 44 – 1945); s.Flak-Abt. 272 (Jul 44 – c.Jan 45); 4./s.Flak-Abt. 396 (Jul 44 – 1945); 4.-5./s.Flak-Abt. 413 (Jul 44 – 1945); s.Flak-Abt. 434 (Mar 44 – 1945); s.Flak-Abt. 435 (Aug 39 – 1939/40); 3./s.Flak-Abt. 443 (Jun-Sep 44); s.Flak-Abt. 464 (Mar 44 – 1945); part of s.Flak-Abt. 477 (Apr-Sep 44); 2./s.Flak-Abt. 539 (Jul 44 – 1945); 3./gem.Flak-Abt. 601 (Jul 44 – 1945); 8./s.Flak-Abt. 616 (Apr-Jul 44); s.Flak-Abt. 674 (Mar 44 – 1945); le.Flak-Abt. 727 (Jun 44 – 1945); Stab/le.Flak-Abt. 990 (Mar-Jul 44). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: Flakscheinw.Abt. 438 (Aug 39). Luftsperr-Abt.: part of Luftsperr-Abt. 104 (Apr 44 – 1945); 3./Luftsperr-Abt. 105 (Apr 44 – 1945); 5./Luftsperr-Abt. 210 (Apr-May 44). Heimat-Flak: le.Heimat-Flak-Battr. 57/IV (Nov 43 – c.Oct 44); s.Heimat-Flak-Battr. 208/IV (1943-45). Other Flak Units ((sonstige, verschiedene Flak): Flak-Waffenwerkstatt (o) 1/IV (1944-45). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Ln.-Abt. 162 (Mar 44 – c.Jan 45?); Fluko Dessau (n.d.). Dessau (GER) (51 50 00 N – 12 12 00 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) in Anhalt 56 km N of Leipzig and 50 km SE of Magdeburg; airfield 3.25 km W of Dessau town center. History: listed as a secondary airport (Flughafen II) in 1932. Wartime factory airfield (Industriehafen) for Junkers airframes and aero-engines. Dimensions: approx. 2100 x 1100 meters (2300 x 1200 yards) following the extension of the landing area in 1943/early 1944. Surface and Runways: flat, dry turf. Had 1 concrete runway measuring approx. 1280 meters (1400 yards) with an E/W alignment. Additionally, a 385 meter (420 yard) starting platform ran NE/SW from - 124 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 the S corner of the landing area and there were prepared takeoff/landing strips on either side of the W end of the runway. A wide, paved taxiway ran along the S boundary. Equipped with perimeter and obstruction lighting, runway and starting platform illumination, and a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the assembly hangars on the E side with underground bulk fuel storage reportedly in a small woods off the SW boundary. The nearest ammunition dump was 5 km S of the airfield on the edge of the Haideburg forest. Infrastructure: there were 3 large flight hangars on the S boundary and 4 large assembly buildings on the E side, all with paved hangar aprons. The extensive buildings of the Junkers airframe factory were off the E boundary, and the buildings of the Aero-engine factory were S of the airfield on the far side of the Dessau-Köthen railway line. A large barracks complex and group of accommodations huts were located 1.2 km N of the airfield. Factory offices, workshops, machine shops, wind tunnel, engine test beds and storage facilities were among the factory buildings off the E boundary, and additional offices and storage buildings were on the S boundary. A branch rail line served the airframe buildings on the E side of the field. Dispersal: there were 2 areas in Mar 44 – South and Southwest – with a total of 13 covered aircraft shelters, 16 open aircraft shelters and 2 aircraft parking sites. Further, a new dispersal site was under construction 2 km off the SW boundary that already consisted of 8 parking bays. Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Dessau-Kühnau (GER) (51 51 20 N – 12 09 00 E). Dummy c. 47 km SE of Magdeburg, 12 km NW of Dessau factory airfield and 2.5 km W of the village of Grosskühnau. The mock-up replicated the layout of Dessau factory airfield with phony runways, hangars and fake aircraft parked around the hangars. . [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.965 (1944)] Remarks: 28 May 44: airfield and factory bombed by 49 B-17 Fortresses. 30 May 44: airfield and factory bombed by 83 B-17s. 20 Jul 44: Dessau and environs bombed by 107 B-17s. 16 Aug 44: airfield and factory bombed by 99 B-24 Liberators. 16 Jan 45: Dessau marshaling yards bombed by 146 B-17s. 7/8 Mar 45: Dessau and environs bombed by 526 RAF Lancasters and 5 Mosquitoes. The Junkers plant was heavily hit with severe damage to 4 hangars, fuselage and motor assembly buildings and a number of other buildings; additionally, all electrical power was cut. (German reports) - 125 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 8/9 Apr 45: Dessau and environs attacked by 71 RAF Mosquitoes. 10/11 Apr 45: Dessau rail depot radar bombed by 13 8th AAF B-24s. 23 Apr 45: Dessau taken by U.S. 1st Army. Operational Units: II., III./KG 77 (Jun 41); 5./Gruppe Nord (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (May 43 – 1944/45). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Heimat-Flak-Battr. 57/IV (D-Marke, 1943-44); Heimat-Flak-Battr. 208/IV (D-Waldersee, 1943-44); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 1/IV (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.565-67 (10 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dethlingen (GER) (52 57 04 N – 10 06 53 E) General: landing ground of satellite field of Fassberg airfield in Lower Saxony 2 or 3 km NW of the village of Trauen. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Detmold (GER) (51 56 40 N – 08 54 15 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 26 km NNE of Paderborn in North Rhine – Westphalia and 25.6 km ESE of Bielefeld; airfield located 1.6 km NE of Detmold. History: constructed 1934-35 and began operating at the beginning of 1936. Officially established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Served as a recruit depot and flight training facility through 1941, then as a technical training school and replacement depot from 1943 and a an air signals school from 1944. Detmold’s extensive billeting capacity was a determining factor in its use. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 640 meters (1,200 x 700 yards). Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: full services were available including a compass swing and machine gun registration range. Had 4 large hangars fronted with paved hangar aprons offering multiple refueling points and interconnected with taxiways, separate workshop buildings around the hangars, a motor pool to the NW of the hangars, a flight control building (Flugleitung), admin and supply buildings, and a huge complex of barrack blocks all on the NW side of the field behind the hangars. The nearest rail connection was 1.6 km SW of the airfield. Dispersal: in Dec 44 the eastern dispersal area had 5 large open aircraft shelters and the northern area had 2 large and 2 small, these also being open. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: - 126 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 14 Jan 45: low-level attack by RAF Tempests – claimed 2 x Ju 52s destroyed and 2 x Fw 190s damaged. 4 Apr 45: Detmold was taken by U.S. forces. Operational Units: III./JG 3 (Mar-Apr 40); II./JG 27 (Nov 40 – Jan 41). School Units: elementary flight school Detmold (Jan 36 – Mar 39); Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 72 (1939-40); Schule/FAR 72 (Apr – Oct 39); Fliegertechnische Schule 7 (c. 1943-45); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 119 (Kassel-Rothwesten) (1941-43); Luftflottennachrichtenschule 8 “Prinz Eugen” (May 44 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Flieger-Ers.Abt. 24 (Oct 36 – Mar 37); Flieger-Ers.Abt. 14 (Oct 37 – Sep 38); Flieger-Ers.Btl. V (1943 – Aug 44). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. Detmold of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 213/XI Lippspringe (c.Oct 44 – c.Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Alfred Sturm (1 Jan 36 - 31 Mar 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 8./le.Flak-Abt. 941 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); 5./le.Flak-Abt. 986 (Nov 44)?; 6.Kp. and 10.Kp./Kw.Trsp.Rgt. 2 (Speer) d.Lw. (1945); Flieger-Ers.Btl. V (c.Jan 43 – Aug 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.116-18 (5 Dec 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dettingen (GER) (a.k.a. Dettingen unter Teck, Nabern/Teck) (48 36 49 N – 09 28 33 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 27 km SE of Stuttgart and 5 km S of Kirchheim unterTeck. History: prepared in the late 1930’s. Later in the war became a factory airfield (Industriehafen) used by the Wolf Hirth GmbH concern. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: unknown. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Deutsch-Buckow (GER) (c. 54 30 30 N – 17 07 10 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Pomerania c. 5 km NE of Stolp (Slupsk) and 3.6 km NNE of Stolp-Reitz airfield near the present-day village of Bukowa. History: possibly used as a satellite field by Stolp-Reitz. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 365 x 455 meters (400 x 500 yards) and irregular in shape.. Infrastructure: had an airship hangar off the W boundary, and barrack-type buildings on the S boundary. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.956 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 127 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Deutsch-Eylau (GER) (a.k.a. Ilawa) (53 35 30 N – 19 35 30 E) General: Einsatzhafen in East Prussia 104 km SE of Danzig and 66 km S of Elbing (Elblag). History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Diepholz (GER) (52 35 15 N – 08 20 45 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 42 km NNE of Osnabrück in Lower Saxony and 2.8 km SSW of Diepholz. History: construction began in fall 1934 and was carried out by Luftwaffe construction troops and the Reichsarbeitsdienst. Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. A Luftpark (air park) was located there since March 1936 and the first flying unit arrived in 1937. Used by bomber units to 1941, by a transport unit in 1942 and then by night fighters toward the end of the war. Dimensions: approx. 1070 x 860 meters (1,170 x 940 yards). Runway: had 1 paved runway measuring c. 1,070 meters, a laddertype servicing tarmac running along the length of the N boundary in front of the hangar area and a paved taxiway. Night landing facilities. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, water, ammunition, communications, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. Had 2 large, 3 medium and 2 small hangars with tarmac aprons along the N boundary, adjacent workshops and a motor pool with garages. Blocks of numerous storage buildings were located to the W, N and NE of the airfield, these dating to the period when Diepholz was home to a Luftpark. Admin buildings were behind the hangar area and a large barrack block at the NE corner. Munitions dumps at the NW and SW corners. A special branch rail line serviced the airfield. Dispersal: in 1941 there were 3 dispersal areas with at least 34 open aircraft shelters. Defenses: 2 large concrete Flak positions, one on a hillock 6 km to the NE near the village of Sankt Hülfe and the other 3 km SE of the airfield. Satellites and Decoys: Diepholz – Heeder Moor (GER) (53 37 30 N – 98 19 30 E). Dummy 11.3 km SSE of Vechta airfield and 4.5 km NW of Diepholz airfield. Mock-up included 3 dummy hangars with aprons and 9 small dummy buildings on the S boundary with decoy lighting surrounding the perimeter. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.610 (21 Apr 44)] Remarks: 1940-43: attacked 13 times by a few aircraft at a time with very little damage resulting. USAAF attacks on 21 Feb 44 and 30 May 44 - 128 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 destroyed the runway, runway drainage system and the hangars, and the repair work required many weeks with a maximum expenditure of labor and resources, according to a Luftgaukdo. XI report. 21 Feb 44: bombed – 1 x Fw 44 and 2 x He 177 A-1s from Erprobungskommando 25 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 6 Apr 45: captured by British troops and then used by the RAF for a short while. Operational Units: III./KG 254 (Apr 37 – Mar 38); II./KG 4 (Dec 39 – Feb 40); III./JG 27 (Nov 40); KGr. z.b.V. 5 (May-Jul 42); KGr. z.b.V. 106 (Nov 42 - Mar 43); KGr. z.b.V. 23 (Apr 43); Stab/TG 2 (Aug-Sep 43); Stab, I./TG 1 (c. Aug-Oct 43). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 33 (Quakenbrück) (1941-42). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Gr./Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (1943-44). Station Commands: Fliegerhorst Diepholz (to Jan 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 24/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Diepholz of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 17/XI Vechta (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Paul Neumann? (Apr 41 ? ); Maj. Paul Schneider, Kdt. Platzkdo. Diepholz (Sep 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftpark Diepholz (c. 1938-41); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 73/XI (1943-45); FliegerGeräteausgabe- und Sammelstelle 2/XI (1942-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.119-22 (14 Dec 43 updated to 24 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Dietersheim (GER) (48 17 35 N – 11 39 45 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 18 km NNE of München (Munich) and 9.7 km NE of Schleissheim airfield. History: still under construction in April 1945 and not yet in service. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1465 x 55 meters (1600 x 60 yards). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.15 (23 Apr 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dievenow (land and sea) (GER) (today: Dziwnów) (54 00 50 N – 14 45 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) and seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) 65 km NNE of Stettin, 58 km W of Kolberg (Kolobrzeg) and 5.25 km N of Cammin (Kamien Pomorski) on the Fritzower See (Lake Fritzower) near the Baltic coast of Pomerania. The airfield was laid out on reclaimed land and the seaplane station was immediately E of the landing area.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 History: planning and construction began in 1935. Ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Used primarily for training and maritime patrol. Dimensions: approx. 780 x 1145 meters (850 x 1250 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: poorly drained grass surface. There was no paved runway in Dec 43, but apparently one was constructed in 1944 (unconfirmed). Also had a paved starting platform at the NE corner and paved taxiways. Anchorage: take-off and landing areas in the Fritzower See afforded a N/S run of 2515 meters (2750 yards) and an E/W run of slightly less. The Camminer Bodden (Cammin Lake) provided ample room in all directions. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were located on the E boundary and a small ammunition dump was in a woods roughly 2 km W of the landing area. Infrastructure: by 1940 had 4 large hangars with paved aprons at the N end, 2 launching ramps (slipways) for seaplanes, admin buildings and barracks. After that, 3 more hangars with paved aprons were built at the N end along with communications facilities and Flak positions and emplacements. There were at least 6 separate workshop buildings behind the hangars. The infrastructure for servicing and supporting seaplane operations was also expanded. The main barracks complex with messes, station offices, etc., was off the NE corner. More barracks and barrack huts were located off the NW corner of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Aircraft were parked in an open area W of the landing area. Defenses: reported 103 heavy and light machine guns deployed to defend the station on 23 Oct 44. Remarks: 29 May 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Ar 196 and 1 x Do 18 destroyed, plus 8 x Do 18s damaged. 6 Oct 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – 4 x Do 18s and 4 x He 111s from Luftnachrichtenschule (See) 6 shot up and severely damaged (incomplete German sources). VIII Fighter Command claimed 3 x He 111s, 7 x He 115s, 7 x Do 18s, 3 x Ar 196s and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 3 x Do 18s and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 7 Oct 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x He 115 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x Ar 196 damaged. 19 Jan 45: partial evacuation ordered following the opening of the Soviet winter offensive in Poland on 12 Jan 45. - 130 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 4 May 45: Dievenow (Dziwnów) captured by Soviet and forces. Operational Units: Kü.Fl.Gr. 306 (Mar 37 – Sep 39); Kü.Fl.Gr. 506 (Jul 37 – Oct 39); Luftdienstkdo. 5 (Oct 38 – Jan 39); Luftdienstkdo. 65 (Jan 39 – Feb 44); 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 706 (1939 – Sep 39); Kü.Fl.Gr. 806 (Oct-Dec 39); Stab I., 1./Fliegerzielgeschwader 1 (Dec 43 – Sep 44); 2./Fliegerzielgeschwader 1 (Dec 43 – c. Apr/May 44); Dec 43 – Fliegerzielgruppe I (Sep 44 – 1945); 1. Minensuchstaffel (c. Oct 44 Feb/Mar 45). School Units: Fliegerwaffenschule (See) 3 (Nov 39 – Mar 40); Luftnachrichtenschule (See) 6 (Apr 40 – Sep 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/III (Apr 44 – 1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Führer der Luft Ost (Aug 39 – Apr 40); Koflug 10/XI (Feb-Apr 45); Flugmelde-Funk-Kp. z.b.V. 21 (c.Nov 44 – Jan 45 - refitting); II./Ln.-Ausb.Rgt. 4 (Sep 44 – Jan 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.568-70 (13 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dobberphul (GER) (a.k.a. Dobropole) (c. 53 51 N – 14 44 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania 35 km E of Swinemünde (Swinoujscie). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Döberitz (GER) (a.k.a. Döberitz-Elsgrund) (52 32 00 N – 12 59 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 26 km W of Berlin in Brandenburg, 4 km W of Döberitz Kaserne and immediately S of the village of Elstal. History: built in 1934 and established as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Served as an important fighter station throughout the pre-war and war years. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 870 meters (1000 x 950 yards). The W side of the landing area was being extended in mid-1944 and some of it was already completed and operational. Surface and Runways: flat and sandy grass surface. No paved runway but there were paved taxiways. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were most probably in front of the hangars at the SW corner as well as on the NW boundary. Bulk fuel storage was believed to be off the W boundary. An ammunition dump was in a small woods off the NW boundary. Infrastructure: there were 2 very large, 3 large and 1 medium hangar at the SW corner, and 1 large and 1 medium hangar at the NE corner. All were fronted with paved hangar aprons. Workshops were along the N boundary and adjacent to the hangars. Further, 4 engine test beds were located at the NE corner. A large complex to the N and NE of the landing area included admin offices, barracks, messes, quarters - 131 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 for officers and others, storage buildings, etc. The station flight control building was near the hangars at the SW corner. A branch rail line served the N side of the airfield and the Elstal marshaling yards was 2 km to the N. Dispersal: no organized dispersal - aircraft were parked in scrub land off the SE boundary. Defenses: layout details of Flak positions unknown. Remarks: bombed as part of the overall air campaign on Berlin and environs, but no specific bombing of Döberitz airfield has been found. Operational Units: I./JG 132 (May 34 – Oct 38); III./JG 134 (Jan-Feb 36); Stab/JG 132 (Apr 36 – Oct 38); Stab, I./JG 131 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); Stab, I./JG 2 (May-Nov 39); 10.(N)/JG 2 (May-Nov 39); I./JG 20 (Jul-Aug 39, Nov 39 – Feb 40); I./JG 77 (May-Jul 40); Stab/JG 77 (Jun-Nov 40); III./JG 26 (Jul 40); III./JG 77 (Jul-Nov 40); I./JG 27 (Dec 40 – Feb 41); Stab/JG 52 (Jan-Feb 41); II./JG 27 (Jul-Sep 41); III./JG 27 (Oct-Dec 41); Erprobungskdo. XI. Fliegerkorps (May-Dec 42?); Stab/NJG 5 (Sep 42 – Mar 44); 17./LLG 1 (Dec 42 – Jan 43); I./JG 3 (Feb-Apr 43); Stab/JG 302 (Jan-May 44); III./JG 11 (Apr 45); Flieger-Kp./Ln.-Rgt. Reich (1945). School Units: Stab/4. Fliegerschuldivision (D-Elsgrund, 1944 – c.Mar 45); Fallschirm-Oberjäger-Schule (1945). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (c. Nov 39 – Apr 42); Erg.Jagdstaffel 1 (Nov – Dec 39); Erg.Gr./JG 52 (Feb – May 41); IV./JG 1 (Apr 42)?; Stab/Erg.Nahaufkl.Gr. (Apr – Nov 42); 15./SG 151 (Feb 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Döberitz (to c. 11/43?); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 19/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Karl Viek (17 Oct 39 - Sep 40); Obstlt. Rudolf von Katte (Sep 40 - Jan 41); Obstlt. Julius Liebrecht (Sep 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/1. Jagddivision (Oct 43 – Feb 45); Stab/4. Jagddivision (Oct 42 – Oct 43); Stab/30. Jagddivision (D-Elsgrund, Oct 43 – Mar 44); Stab/Jagdfliegerführer Berlin-Mitteldeutschland (Sep 41 – Oct 43); Nachtjagdraumführer 105 (Jul 42 – c.May 44); Koflug 4/III (Apr 39 – c.Oct 40); Werft-Abt. d.Lw. 8/III (Sep/Oct 44); I./Flak-Rgt. 22 (gem. mot.) (Jul 38 – Aug 39); Res.Flak-Abt. 221 (Eisb.) (Aug 39 - ? ); schw.Flak-Abt. 221(o) (Aug 39 – 1940); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 3/III (1944-45); II.(Eis.Flum.)/Ln.Rgt. 42 (Aug 42 – May 43?); Stab and I.(Ln.Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 204 (early 43 – Sep 44); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 211 (Sep 44 – Apr 45); I.(Ln.-Betr.)/Ln.Rgt. 211 (Sep 44 – Apr 45); Stab II.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 211 (Falkenrehde, Sep 44 – Apr 45); Stab and I.(Ln.Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 214 (c.Apr-Jul 43); 7.(Flugm.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 3 (1939-40); - 132 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Verladestelle des Luftgaukdo. III (1944-45); Flieger-Ausb.Rgt. 23 (Nov 39 – Jul 40); Lw.-Feld-Btl. z.b.V. 100 (Dec 42 – Jan 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.571-74 (24 Mar 44 updated to 7 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dockendorf (GER) (49 55 30 N – 06 27 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 23 km NW of Trier and 7.3 km SW of Bitburg. History: used as an intermediate landing ground for single-engine aircraft engaged in the attack in the West May-Jun 40. Listed as still operational in Jan 45. Surface and Dimensions: fighter strip with a grass surface. Infrastructure: none. Nearest rail connection at Wolsfeld, 1.6 km SSE of Dockendorf. Operational Units: elements of I./JG 2 (May 40); elements of II./JG 53 (May 40); I./St.G. 76 (May 40). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.99 (21 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Donaueschingen/Nord (GER) (47 58 40 N – 08 31 20 E) General: dispersal field (Ausweichflugplatz), parking field for aircraft not in use (Abstellplatz) and satellite field (Schattenplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 106 km SSW of Stuttgart; airfield 5 km N of Donaueschingen/Süd airstrip and 3.25 km NNE of the town of Donaueschingen. History: dates from fall 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 685 x 365 meters (750 x 400 yards) and triangular in shape. Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar at the SW corner with a small shed adjoining it. Nearest rail connection in Donaueschingen. Dispersal: there were an undetermined number of aircraft bays cut into the edge of woods at the NE corner. Operational Units: 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 32 (May-Jun 40). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.102 (25 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Donaueschingen/Süd (GER) (47 56 00 N – 08 31 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 106 km SSW of Stuttgart; airfield 2.4 km SE of Donaueschingen. History: dates from the late 1930’s. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1190 x 1050 meters (1300 x 1150 yards) with an irregular shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: none within a kilometer of the landing area. Nearest rail connection at Donaueschingen. Dispersal: no organized dispersal. Woods along the S and SE sides provided natural cover. Remarks:

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 4 Mar 45: bombed – no aircraft hit, but flight control building destroyed, station HQ heavily damaged and landing area cratered. (German reports) Operational Units: 2./NAGr. 13 (Oct 44 – Apr 45); III./JG 76 (Oct 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 211/XII (c.Oct 44 – c.Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): elements of HeimatFlak-Bttr. 34/VII (Nov-Dec 44); 13.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 7 (1944); 2.(Flum.Leit)/Ln.-Rgt. 227 (Nov 44 – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.100 (6 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Donauwörth (GER) (48 30 30 N – 10 45 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Bavaria 38 km N of Augsberg; airfield 1.5 km NW of Donauwörth. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Heimat-Flak-Battr. 8/VII (1944). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Donebach (GER) (c. 49 34 04 N – 09 11 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Wurttemberg 40 km NE of Heidelberg and 3 km N of the town of Mudau. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dormettingen (GER) (48 15 00 N – 08 46 15 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 69 km SSW of Stuttgart, 14 km NE of Rottweil and 1 km NW of Dormettingen village. History: dates from fall 1944. Had no or very little use. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 960 x 550 meters (1050 x 600 yards). Landing area possibly obstructed in Dec 44. No paved runway. Infrastructure: a small group of buildings approx. 460 meters S of the SW corner may have been used as workshops. Nearest rail connection 2.4 km SE of the landing area. Dispersal: no organized dispersal, but woods on the N boundary could have been used to conceal parked aircraft. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 234/VII Hailfingen (c. Oct 44 – Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.101 (29 Dec 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Dörnberg (GER) (51 22 00 N – 09 20 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Hesse 5 km WNW of Kassel and 2.8 km S of Dörnberg. History: used mainly for glider training. Surface and Dimensions: irregular, rolling surface measuring approx. 915 x 460 meters (1000 x 500 yards). Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.584-638 (4 Sep 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dornberg (GER) (49 37 10 N – 09 25 15 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Baden-Württemberg 41 km WSW of Würzburg, 6 km NE of the village of Walldürn and immediately SW of Dornberg village. History: dates from the late 1930’s. Inactive following the May-Jun 1940 attack in the West and then reactivated in Sep 44 as an elementary flight training field. Dimensions: approx. 730 x 915 meters (800 x 1000 yards) and roughly square in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface in good condition. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: underground fuel storage tanks were likely on the S boundary. There were small ammunitions dumps on the N boundary and in a woods approx. 1370 meters to the W. Infrastructure: small buildings along the S boundary were probably used as workshops. Barrack huts were in the nearby village of Schleinpertshof and shorage sheds were on the S boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal. Defenses: none identified. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: practice field (Arbeitsplatz) for L.S.-Ausbildungsstaffel für Sturzkampfverbände (L.S.-Ausbildungsgruppe Wertheim) (194344); FFS A 2 (Sep 44 – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Dornberg (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 40/XIII (Mar-Apr 40); Flugplatzkdo. Dornberg of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 210/XII Wertheim (c.Oct 44 – Jan 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.103 (4 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dornstadt (GER): (see Ulm-Dornstadt. Dorsten-Freudenberg (GER) (51 33 25 N – 06 54 50 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) from at least 1927 to 1945 in North Rhine – Westphalia 22 km N of Essen in the Ruhr; airfield located 8 km NW of Dorsten. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: Grass surface on burned-off moorland. Infrastructure: none noted. Satellites and Decoys: Dorsten (GER) (51 43 35 N – 06 54 50 E). Dummy 31 km NNW of Essen, 12 km NE of Kirchhellen airfield and 7.7 km NNW of Dorsten. Mock-up included a c. 1100 x 460 meter landing area with dummy aircraft parked along the edge of woods on the NW boundary and the SE corner. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.607 (24 Dec 44)] Operational Units: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Heimat-Nebel-Kp. d.Lw. 3/VI (1943 - ? ). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dortmund (GER) (51 30 N – 07 27 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/Jagdfliegerführer 2 (Jan-May/Jun 40). Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/22. Flak-Div. (May 43 – Apr 45); Stab/Flak-Brig. X (Apr 41 – Dec 42); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 4 (Flakgruppe Dortmund) (Oct 36 – May/Jun 40); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 124 (Flakgruppe Dortmund) (Jun 40 – Mar 45); Stab/Flakscheinwerfer-Rgt. 146(o) (Flakscheinwerfergruppe Dortmund) (Jan 42 – Mar 45); II./Flak-Rgt. 4 (Oct 36 – Nov 38); III.(scheinw.)/Flak-Rgt. 4 (Nov 38 – 1940); schw.Flak-Abt. 112(o) (May-Nov 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 125 (Eisb.) (Sep 44 – 1945); part of schw.Flak-Abt. 133(o) (Jun-Jul 44); Stab/schw.Flak-Abt. 146(o) (1943 – Dec 43); Flakscheinw.Abt. 158(o) (1941-45); Flakscheinw.Abt. 170(o) (c.1942-45); Luftsperr-Abt. 209(o) (c.1943 – Jun 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 221(o) (mid-40 – 1945); Flakscheinw.Abt. 229(o) (1942 – Feb 44); Flakscheinw.Abt. 230(o) (c.1941-45); 6./schw.Flak-Abt. 321(o) (Dec 43 – Mar 44); 4./schw./Flak-Abt. 324(o) (Jul-Aug 44); Flakscheinw.Abt. 329(v) (Dec 43 – 1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 333(o) (1942-45); 1./schw.Flak-Abt. 335(o) (Jul-Aug 44); Flakscheinw.Abt. 358(v) (Jan-Feb 44); 6., 7./schw.Flak-Abt. 389(o) (Jul-Aug 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 401(o) (Aug 39 – 1940); gem.Flak-Abt. 402(v) (Aug 39 – 1940); Flakscheinw.Abt. 408(o) (Aug 39 – 1940); Flakscheinw.Abt. 409(o) (Aug 39 – 1930); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 416 (Eisb.) (May-Jun 44); 1./schw.Flak-Abt. 430 (Eisb.) (Apr-Jun 44); part of schw.Flak-Abt. 446(o) (Apr-Aug 44); 3./schw.Flak-Abt. 463(o) (Jul-Aug 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 466(o) (c.Aug - 136 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 41 – 1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 477(o) (Nov 43 – Apr 44, Oct 44 – 1945); Flakscheinw.Abt. 479(o) (Oct 43 – 1945); 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 524(o) (Jun-Aug 44); 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 536 (Eisb.) (May-Jul 44); le.Flak-Abt. 668(v) (c.May-Jul 42); le.Flak-Abt. 745(o) (mid-43 – 1945); le.FlakAbt. 840(o) (Jul 42 – 1945); 2./le.Flak-Abt. 849(v) (Jun-Jul 44); 2, 5, 6./le.Flak-Abt. 943(o) (Jun-Jul 44); Flak-Ers.Abt. 96 (Aug 39 – 1945); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 10/VI (1944-45). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 17 (1940-43); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 23 (Jan 40 – 1941); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 24 (D-Marten, c.1943-45); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 29 (1943-44); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 55 (1944-45); Luftschutz-Kp. z.b.V. 1/VI (c.1943-45). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Ln.-Abt. 142 (May 43 – Apr 45); Ln.-Kp. z.b.V. 20 (fall 44 – 1945); Fluko Dortmund. Dortmund-Brackel (GER) (51 32 30 N – 07 33 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 6 km ENE of Dortmund in the Ruhr area in North Rhine – Westphalia. Not to be confused with DortmundWickede, the name of Dortmund’s present day airport. History: first used as an occasional landing ground in 1914, developed as a civil airport that opened in May 1925, and then further developed with a terminal, hotel, restaurant, hangar, control tower and other modern buildings over the next several years. 1927 classified as a Verkehrslandeplatz. The first Luftwaffe flying unit was stationed there from March 1936 and shared Brackel with the civil airport until 26 August 1939 when it was fully militarized. Just about every type of Luftwaffe unit was stationed there at one time or another during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1600 x 970 meters (1,750 x 1,060 yards). Runway: had 1 paved runway measuring c.1,050 meters and a concrete perimeter road. A second concrete runway was started in 1940 but only some 400 meters was completed before it was abandoned. Night landing facilities. Infrastructure: fuel, water, ammunition, communications, compass swing and other amenities were available. Had 1 very large, 1 large and 8 medium hangars, all but two of these along the S boundary and all with paved hangar aprons. Behind the hangars were 5 motor pool garages, workshops, admin buildings, station HQ (Horstkommandantur), barrack blocks, messes, base gym, sports ground, swimming pool and other buildings. The flying control (Flugleitung) building was at the W end of the hangar line. Munitions dump off the E boundary. A main rail line parallels the N side of the airfield. Dispersal: there were four separate areas in June 1944 with a total of 51 large and small open aircraft shelters plus 8 additional hardstands. - 137 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: there were 3 heavy and several light Flak positions in the immediate vicinity of the field as well as further protection from the thick array of Flak defending the city of Dortmund. Remarks: although the city of Dortmund was bombed numerous times, the airfield seems to have escaped intentional heavy bombing. 24 Mar 45: strafed – 1 x Bf 110 destroyed; 2 KIA and 5 WIA. (German report) 26 Mar 45: strafed by 4 P-47s – 1 x Ju 88 destroyed. (German report) 28 Mar 45: the last flying unit departed Brackel. 70 men from the ground defense then destroyed the runway and demolished the hangars and the technical infrastructure. 12 Apr 45: U.S. tanks captured the airfield. Operational Units: I./JG 134 (Apr 34 – Oct 38); 7./JG 134 (Mar 36 – Mar 37); Stab/JG 134 (Apr 36 – Oct 38); IV./JG 134 (Jul-Oct 38); Stab, I./JG 142 (Nov-Dec 38); Stab, I./ZG 142 (Jan-Apr 39); Stab, I., III./ZG 26 (May 39 – 1940); Stab/JG 26 (Nov 39 – Jul 40); I./JG 26 (Nov 39 – Feb 40, Feb-Mar 41); II./JG 26 (Jan-Jul 40); II./KG z.b.V. 1 (May 40); Stab, III./JG 54 (Dec 40 – Jan 41); IV./JG 51 (Jun 41); I./JG 1 (Dec 43 – Feb 44); Sturmstaffel 1 (Dec 43 – Feb 44); II./JG 300 (Apr-Jun 44); I./JG 3 (Sep 44); Stab/JG 4 (Sep-Nov 44); III./JG 300 (Sep 44); Stab, IV./NJG 1 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); Gefechtsverband Michalski (Sep-Oct 44); Stab/JG 77 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); I./JG 77 (Dec 44 – Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. Dortmund-Brackel (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 15/VI (1943 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 4/VI (1 Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Max Krug ( ? - 23 Apr 42). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Frontfliegersammelgruppe Dortmund (1942); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./ZG 26. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.123-27 (17 Dec 43 updated to 13 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Dosse (GER): see Wittstock-Dosse. Dramburg (GER) (53 28 45 N – 15 43 30 E) General: Notlandeplatz (emergency landing ground) 47.5 km ENE of Stargard in Pomerania and 8.25 km SW of Dramburg (today: Drawsko Pomorskie). History: existed 1940 to Feb 45 under Koflug Stargard/Luftgaukdo. III. It was classified as a Notlandeplatz (emergency landing ground) with a grass runway. It was used as an Arbeitsplatz (practice field) for gliders by Flugzeugführerschule A/B

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 118 (Stettin) beginning in 1940. Infrastructure: had no hangars, buildings or services. School Units: Arbeitsplatz (gliders) for FFS A/B 118 then FFS A 118 (Stettin-Altdamm) (1940-44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.956 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dreisen-Göllheim (GER) (49 35 30 N – 08 01 20 E) General: satellite airfield or landing ground (Schattenplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz, 35.5 km WNW of Mannheim, 27 km WSW of Worms, 26 km NE of Kaiserslautern and 2 km WSW of Göllheim village adjacent to the Göllheimer Wald (Göllheim Woods). History: hurriedly laid out in mid-1944 for use by night fighters based in the Mainz-Wiesbaden area. Surface and Dimensions: located in open grain fields and measured approx. 1735 x 365 meters (1900 x 400 yards) with an irregular shape. A well-worn landing strip some 1500 x 120 meters ran along the S boundary. Infrastructure: no hangars or workshops, but a number of barrack huts were located to the WNW near the ammunition dump and the railway. Dispersal: ample concealed aircraft parking on the edge of woods to the S and W of the landing area. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 23/VII MainzFinthen (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.159 (13 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dresden (GER) (51 03 N – 13 44 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates and not specifically identified with the airfield): for Luftwaffe city garrison units and details, mainly Flak, go to Google and enter: Dresden site:ww2.dk. Some of the listed Flak and other ground units may have been in the immediate proximity of the airfield or airfields around the city. Also: Luftkreiskdo. III (Apr 34 – Mar 36?); Stab/Luftgaukdo. 7 (Apr 36 – Oct 37); Stab/Luftgaukdo. IV (D-Strehlen, Oct 37 – Nov 41); Befehlsstelle Dresden d.Luftgaukdo. III (Jan-Apr 45); Stab/2. Fliegerdivision (Aug 38 – Aug 39); Stab/4. Flak-Brig. (D-Mockritz, c.Sep 44 – Jan 45); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 30 (1941-42); 13. (le.Flum.)/Ln.-Rgt. 231 (Jan 45); Ln.-Abt. 32 (early 1940); Ln.-Abt. 164 (D-Mockritz, c.Nov 44 – Jan 45); Kdr.d.Kraftfahrinstandsetzung d.Lw. 2/III (1943 – 1944/45); Hauptgebührnisstelle d.Lw. 5/III (Oct 44). Dresden-Heller (GER) (51 05 30 N – 13 45 35 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Saxony 3.25 km N of Dresden city center and 4 km S of Dresden-Klotzsche airfield. History: established as a civil airport in the 1920’s but then closed about 1930 because of its bad surfaces and approaches and replaced by Dresden-Klotzsche as Dresden’s civil airport. Taken over by the Luftwaffe before the war began and used as a practice field for singleengine trainers to 1945. Dimensions: approx. 730 x 550 meters (800 x 600 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: inadequately drained grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel was available. Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar on the S boundary with a few adjacent sheds that may have been used as workshops, and a few buildings to the rear of the hangar that were used as offices and barracks, with the station motor pool and garages in the same area. The airfield flight control building was at the SE corner. Several barrack buildings were on the E boundary, and there was an extensive barracks complex to the S of the landing area. The Dresden-Cottbus rail line passed close to the E boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal area. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: the airfield is not known to have been intentional bombed by Allied aircraft during the war. Operational Units: Überführungskdo. Luftzeuggruppe 4 (1942); 3., 4./Gruppe Mitte (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (May 43 – 1944/45); 4. Minensuchstaffel (Oct 44 – 1945). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS Dresden-Klotzsche then LKS 1 (1936-45); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 61, FFS A/B 61 then FFS A 61 (Oschatz) (1939-44). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Heimat-Flak-Battr. 207/IV (1943). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.578-80 (31 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dresden-Kaditz (GER) (51 04 30 N – 13 26 00 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Saxony 4.8 km NW of the city. History: established in 1913 for aircraft, seaplanes and airships. Used very little during World War II. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dresden-Klotzsche (GER) (51 07 40 N – 13 46 20 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Saxony 9 km N of Dresden city center and 1.2 km N of the town of Klotzsche. History: construction began in July 1934 and the first flying unit moved in exactly a year later when Klotzsche was officially designated a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur on 11 July 1935. At the same time along the E boundary, Luftkriegsschule 1 with a total of 60 buildings was built and included school classrooms, admin offices, barracks, quarters, messes, etc., this opening on 16 April 1936. The airfield also served as a civil airport until April 1940. Klotzsche served as a major training field during the war and no combat units were based there until Feb 45. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 730 meters (1400 x 800 yards) and rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface on sandy sub-soil. No paved runway. Equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the hangars at the NE corner and in front of the hangar at the SW corner. Underground bulk fuel storage was in woods off the NE boundary. A small ammunition dump was located off the NW boundary. Infrastructure: had 1 large flight hangar formerly used by civil aircraft at the SW corner, and 5 large flight hangars and 1 large repair hangar plus adjacent workshops on the NE boundary. The hangars and workshops on the NE boundary were used exclusively by Luftkriegsschule 1. The civil airport terminal and buildings were all at the SW corner and included station offices and restaurants. A branch rail like served the buildings on the NE side. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: the airfield was not intentional bombed by Allied aircraft during the war. 17 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 9 x Fw 190s, 6 x Me 410s, 4 x Ju 88s and 7 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 6 x Fw 190s, 1 x Me 410, 1 x Ju 88 and 10 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 7 May 45: Soviet troops reached the outskirts of Dresden this date and entered the city the next day taking the airfield intact with only the telephone exchange and radio station having been demolished. Operational Units: Sanitäts-Flugbereitschaft 4 (Mar-Jun 41); 4. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Dec 41 – Apr 42)?; Stab, II., III./SG 4 (Feb-Apr 45); III./TG 2 (Mar 45); I./KG 4 (Mar-Apr 45); 14.(Eis.)/KG 55 (Apr 45). School Units: Kdo.d.Fliegerschule- u.FEA 3 (Apr 34 – Feb 37); Kdo.d.Fliegerschule- u.FEA 4 (Mar 37 – Feb 39); Höh.Fl.Ausb.Kdo. 4 (Mar 39 – Nov 41?); III.(Ausb.Abt.f.Ln.Helferinnen)/Luftgau- 141 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Nachr.Rgt. 3 (1942-43); III.(Funkmesswesen)/Ln.-Ausb.Rgt. 303 (c. Oct-Dec 42); Höh.Kdr.d.Luftkriegsschulen- u.Uffz.-Schulen (Jan 44 – Oct 44); Höh.Kdo.d.Luftkriegsschulen (Oct 44 – Apr 45); LKS DresdenKlotzsche (Apr 36 – Jan 40); LKS 1 (Jan 40 – Apr 45); Luftflottennachrichtenschule 7 (Sep 44 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: III.(Ers.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 4 (1940-42); II.(Ers.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 3 (1942-44); Ln.-Ers.u.Ausb.Rgt. 1 (c. Oct 43 – Feb 44); II./Ln.-Ers.-u.Ausb.Rgt. 1 (c. Mar 43 – Apr 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Dresden-Klotzsche (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 40/IV (1942-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 38/III (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftgaustab z.b.V. Russland bei der Heeresgruppe Nord (Apr-May 41); Koflug 7/III; Luftzeuggruppe 4 (c. 1939-42); Luftzeuggruppe 3 (c. 1942-45); schw.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 221/IV (Jan 43 – c.Feb 44); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 727 (Nov-Dec 43); schw.Flak-Bttr. z.b.V. 5584 (Aug 44); II.(Ln.Bau)/Ln.Rgt. 1 (Jul 38 – early 1940); 7./Ln.-Abt. 41 (Jul 41); Kw.Werkstatt-Kp. d.Lw. 103/IV (1944-45)?; Luftgaubereichswerkstatt (N) 1/III ( ? – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.575-77 (31 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Dresden-Nickern (GER) (51 00 13 N – 13 47 42 E) General: airfield (Flugplatz) in Saxony 7.3 km SE of the city. History: Luftwaffe use prior to 1944 not found. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Waffentechnische Schule für Fallschirmspringer (c. 1940-43); Fliegerwaffentechnische Schule 4 (1943 – Sep 44); Fliegertechnische Schule (W) 9 (Sep 44 – Apr 45). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Kfz.Beständebezirk d.Lw. 5/III (Sep 44); Kfz.Beständebezirk d.Lw. 12/III (Feb 44); Sanitäts-Ausbildungs-Abt. d.Lw. 4 (1939-42). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Drewitz (GER) (51 53 20 N – 14 31 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Brandenburg 20 km NE of Cottbus, 14 km WSW of Guben and 1.2 km SE of the village of Drewitz. History: dates from 1928-29 when it was first used as a civil landing ground. Developed for military use 1937-38. Used mainly as a practice field for elementary flight instruction. All training ended in September and the students were sent to Luftwaffe field units and to

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 the railway Flakartillerie. Fighters began using Drewitz in Jan 45 as Soviet forces approached the Oder. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 1280 meters (1050 x 1400 yards) and oval in shape. German sources give the wartime dimensions as 1000 x 1200 meters. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel was available as needed. The station ammunition dump was in the woods off the S boundary. Infrastructure: had 1 very large servicing and repair hangar with a paved hangar apron off the N boundary. Several station buildings used for admin offices and 3 long, wooden barrack buildings were off the N boundary behind the hangar. The nearest rail connection was the Cottbus-Guben line running 1.6 km SW of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: III., IV./JG 4 (Jan-Feb 45); 9./JG 6 (Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 41, FFS A/B 41 then FFS A 41 (Frankfurt/Oder) (1939-45); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 3 (Guben). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Drewitz (1938-41?); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 2/IV (1941? – Mar 44); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 23/III Guben (Apr 44 1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.581 (14 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Drewitz (GER) (a.k.a. Potsdam-Drewitz) (c. 52 22 08 N – 13 06 51 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 7 km ESE of Potsdam near Berlin. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Drope (GER) (52 35 40 N – 07 28 25 E) General: dispersal and satellite landing ground (Abstellplatz and Schattenplatz) in Lower Saxony 13.5 km ENE of Lingen near the border with Holland and 2.4 km NW of Drope. Came under or assigned to Quakenbrück airfield. History: no information, except that no evidence of use prior to November 1944 has been found. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 1190 meters (1,400 x 1,300 yards. Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: none. Nearest rail connection 1.6 km SSW of the field. Dispersal: in adjoining fields and hedges. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: - 143 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 26 Nov 44: reported plans to use hangars around the taxying area for parking 15 to 20 training aircraft. Operational Units: II./JG 1 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); Stab, I./JG 26 (MarApr 45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. Drope of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 104/XVII Plantlünne (Nov-Dec 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 219/VIII (Dec 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Feldwerft-Staffel 7/30 (c.24 Mar 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.128 (5 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Düdelsheim (GER) (50 18 13 N – 09 01 51 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Hesse 32 km NE of Frankfurt/M. History: listed as still operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Air Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) Düdelsheim had a normal station complement of no (zero) officers and officials (Beamten) with 120 NCOs and men in Aug 40. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Duisburg (GER) (51 25 N – 06 45 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/3. Jagddivision (Sep-Oct 44). Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/4. Flak-Div. (Jun 42 – Apr 45). Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 64(o) (as Flaggruppe Duisburg) (Sep 39 – 1945); Stab/Flakscheinw.Rgt. 74(o) as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Duisburg) (Jul 41 – 1945). Flak-Abt.: schw.112(o); schw.243(o); schw.244 (o); schw.263 (Eisb.); gem.282(v); schw.305(o); schw.337(o); schw.366(o); schw.389(o); schw.394(o); schw.401(o); schw.416 (Eisb.); schw.423 (Eisb.); schw.444 (Eisb.); schw.446(o); schw.447(o); schw.471(o); schw.472(o); schw.473 (Eisb.); gem.476(o); schw.514(o); schw.535 (Eisb.); schw.543 (Eisb.); schw.623(o); schw.625(o); schw.642(o); schw.643(o); schw.644(o); schw.703(o); le.718(o); le.748(o); le.821 (Eisb.); le.838(o); le.882(o); le.883(o); le.884(o); le.890(o); Kdr. d.Flakinstandsetzung 101/VI (1943-45); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 4/VI (1943-45); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 15/VI (1944-45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: III.(Scheinw.)/Flak-Rgt. 14; 250(o); 258(o); 330(o); 409(o); 468(v); 478(o); 479(o); 518(o); 581(o); III./FlakRgt. 611 (Sw. mot.); 648(o); 649(v). Luftsperr-Abt.: 106(o). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 52 (1944); Heimat-Nebel-Kp. d.Lw. 5/VI (1943 - ? ). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Ln.-Abt. 124 (1943 – Apr 45); Fluko Duisburg. Duisburg (GER) (a.k.a. Duisburg-Neuenkamp) (51 26 30 N – 06 43 40 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 3.2 km WNW of Duisburg/Ruhr and just W of Kasslerfeld. The landing ground was less than a kilometer from the rivers Rhein and Ruhr. History: the existing landing ground was enlarged during 1934-35 but remained mainly for civil use. In use during the campaign in France in 1940, then occasional use by air defense fighters protecting the Ruhr area. Dimensions: 850 x 850 meters. Runway: grass and sand surface. Infrastructure: had 1 medium hangar and a number of small buildings off the SW corner of the landing area. Nearest rail connection at Duisburg. Dispersal: none. Defenses: 2 heavy and 5 light Flak positions less than a kilometer of the landing ground in Oct 43, most of these with multiple guns and some of the light Flak mounted in towers, and many other positions farther out in defense of the city. Remarks: 1940-45: Duisburg heavily bombed by the RAF and to a lesser extent by the USAAF, but the airfield does not appear to have been targeted. 9 Mar 45: airfield ordered evacuated and destroyed immediately. 29 Mar 45: Duisburg taken by U.S. forces. Operational Units: IV.(Stuka)/LG 1 (Feb?-May 40). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Ln.-Abt. 359 (Velbert?, Aldekerk?, Mar 45); 5./Ln.-Funkaufklärungs-Abt. Reich (May-Nov 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.129-32 (7 Mar 44 updated to 22 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dülmen-Borkenberge (GER): see Borkenberge. Dumbach (GER) (today: Donebach) (49 33 35 N – 09 10 40 E) General: satellite or dispersal airfield (Ausweichflugplatz) and emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Hesse 54 km E of Mannheim and .8 km W of Dumbach village. History: in existence since 1940 but with little wartime activity, if any. Ordered rehabilitated has an alternative landing ground in Sep 44 but this

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 apparently not carried out. Surface and Dimensions: leveled grass surface measuring approx. 640 x 455 meters (700 x 500 yards) and irregular in shape. Infrastructure: none. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.32 and 107 (10 Oct 44 updated to 14 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dümmer Lake (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Diepholz, Vörden or Vechta airfield - see there. Dumröse (GER) (a.k.a. Domaradz) (c. 54 26 N – 17 15 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania 16 km E of Stolp (Slupsk). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Dünstekoven (GER) (50 41 40 N – 06 55 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 12 km WSW of Bonn and .8 km SSW of Dünstekoven. History: used Nov 39 - May 1940 but inactive after that. Observed to be permanently obstructed by rough plowing in 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 915 x 365 meters (1000 x 400 yards). Infrastructure: had a group of huts and 2 long sheds along the S boundary. Operational Units: II./JG 77 (Nov 39); I./JG 51 (May 40); 3./JG 3 (May 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 19/VI (May 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.584-638 (19 Sep 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Durlach (GER): see Karlsruhe-Durlach. Düsseldorf (GER) (51 14 09 N – 06 46 54 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/4. Fliegerdiv. (Oct 39); Stab/IV. Fliegerkorps (Oct 39 – May 40); Jagdabschnittsführer Ruhrgebiet (Jul 44). Antiaircraft (Flak): Luftverteidigungskdo. 4 (c.1940 – Aug 41); Stab/4. Flak-Div. (Düsseldorf-Ratingen, Sep 41 – 1943); Stab/1. FlakBrig. (Apr 45). Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 24 (mot.) (as Flakgruppe Düsseldorf) (1939-45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 40 (mot.); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 164 (mot.). Flak-Abt.: I./Flak-Rgt. 64 (gem. mot.); schw.133(o); gem.141(v); schw.151(o); schw.177(o); schw.231(o); schw.244(o); schw.262(o); schw.278 (Eisb.); schw.353(o); schw.381(o); gem.382(o); schw.383(o); schw.389(o); schw.394(o); schw.403(o); schw.404(o);

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 schw.405(o); schw.407(o); schw.416 (Eisb.); schw.430 (Eisb.); schw.446(o); schw.471(o); schw.474(o); schw.512(o); gem.641(v); schw.642(o); schw.646(v); le.748(o); le.826(o); le.837(o); le.883(o); le.886(o); le.890(o); le.941(o). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: III./Flak-Rgt. 64 (Sw. mot.); 648(o); 650(o); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 3/VI (1944-45); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 3/XI (D-Hilden, 1943); Flak-Sondergerätwerkstatt (mot) 3/IV (D-Hilden, May 43). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 26 (D-Hilden, 1939 – 1942/43). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 34 (May 40); Stab II./Ln.-Rgt. 53 (Dec 44 – 1945); Lv-Nachr.Abt. 4 (Apr 39 – c.Sep 41); Ln.-Abt. 124 (Sep 41 – 1943); Ln.-Kp. z.b.V. 15 (c.Nov 44 – 1945); Fluko Düsseldorf. Ground Transport (Transportkolonnen): Kfz.Instandsetzungszug d.Lw. 101/VI (May 44). Other (sonstige, verschiedene): Lw.-Festungs-Btl. XV (Sep 44). Düsseldorf (GER) (a.k.a. Düsseldorf-Lohausen) (51 16 40 N – 06 45 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) located at Lohausen 6 km N of the city in the Ruhr area in North Rhine – Westphalia with the airfield 1.6 km E of Lohausen. History: Düsseldorf’s airport since the 1920s. 1927 Verkehrslandeplatz. 1932 Flughafen II. Taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1936 and enlarged. In constant use since then. Dimensions: approx. 1465 x 1100 meters (1,600 x 1,200 yards). Runway: had 3 concrete runways in the form of a triangle, these measuring 1,280 meters, 1,280 meters and 760 meters, a paved hangar apron and a paved perimeter road. Night landing facilities. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, water, ammunition, communications, 2 compass swings, 2 machine gun registration ranges and other amenities were available. Had a large repair hangar plus 4 large and 1 medium hangar all at the SE corner, and 1 large and 1 medium hangar at the SW corner, all fronted by tarmac aprons. Barrack blocks, admin and supply buildings, messes, officers’ quarters, motor pool and other buildings were behind the hangar line at the SE corner. Flying control (Flugleitung) and the meteorological office were adjacent to the repair hangar. A branch rail line served the S end of the landing area. Dispersal: there were 4 dispersal areas in 1944 with a total of 59 open aircraft shelters and blast bays, 7 additional hardstands and 8 additional parking sites.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: had 2 heavy and 7 light Flak positions within 3.6 km of the airfield in Jan 44, most of these with multiple guns. The airfield was also protected by the Flak belt surrounding the city of Düsseldorf. Remarks: 1940-45: city heavily bombed by RAF Bomber Command and to a much lesser extent by the USAAF. 24 Dec 44: bombed by approx. half of 338 RAF bombers that attacked the airfields at Düsseldorf and Essen – 3 x Bf 109 K-4s from II. and III./JG 77 destroyed (2) or damaged (1); airfield reported unserviceable due to severe bomb damage including 600 craters on runway and taxiway; estimated repair time 4 weeks. 25 Dec 44: low-level attack by P-47s – 1 x Bf 109 K-4 from III./JG 77 damaged. Jan-Feb 45: airfield reported to be severely damaged. 9 Mar 45: airfield ordered evacuated and destroyed immediately. 17 Apr 45: Düsseldorf taken by U.S. 3rd Army. Operational Units: 7./JG 134 (Mar 36 – Mar 37); Stab, II./JG 132 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); Stab, II./JG 26 (May-Aug 39, Feb-Mar 41); Stab, II., III./KG 77 (Oct 39 – Jun 40); I./ZG 2 (Dec 39); I./ZG 52 (Dec 39 – Jan 40); 7.(F)/LG 2 (Feb-May 40); Transportstaffel IV. Fliegerkorps (Mar-May 40); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 14 (Mar-May 40); Stab, I., II., III./LG 1 (May-Jun 40); Zerstörerstaffel/KG 30 (Jun 40); II./NJG 1 (Jul-Sep 40, Sep 44 – Mar 45); III./NJG 1 (Jul-Dec 40); Jagdstaffel MünsterLoddenheide (May-Jul 41); Stab/JG 51 (Jun 41); 2./JG 1 (Jul 41); II./JG 27 (Dec 42); III./NJG 3 (Aug-Sep 44); III./JG 77 (Dec 44 – Jan 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./ZG 26 (Jul 41); Erg.Gr./JG 53 (Oct 41 – Jan 42); 3./Erg.JGr. Süd (Feb-Mar 42). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/VI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Ernest Gunczy (1939 - 1940); Obstlt. Paul Breidenbach (1 Aug 42 ? ) 6/44?; Oberst Karl Bode (12 Aug 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Düsseldorf (Jul 39 – c.Dec 40); Koflug 19/XI (Sep-Dec 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.133-40 (16 Jan 44 updated to 28 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

E Ebendorf-Seenwalde (GER): see Seenwalde. Ebingen (GER) (48 11 30 N – 09 03 00 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 65 km S of Stuttgart and 33 S of the TübingenReutlingen area. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Echterdingen (GER) (a.k.a. Stuttgart-Echterdingen, Stuttgart/Süd) (48 41 15 N – 09 12 15 E) General: Airfield (Fliegerhorst) 10 km S of Stuttgart city center in Baden-Württemberg and 2.5 km ESE of the town of Echterdingen (Leinfelden-Echterdingen). History: constructed 1937-39 as the new civil airport for Stuttgart, replacing Stuttgart-Böblingen. Wartime use was mainly as a night fighter station, both training and operational, although civil aircraft (Lufthansa) still flew in and out on occasion. Day fighters were also based there in 1944-45. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1370 meters (1100 x 1500 yards) with roughly an oval shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Had a single approx. 1370 meter (1500 yard) concrete runway aligned ENE/WSW. Two fanshaped starting platforms were at the NE and SW corners near both ends of the runway, and a wide perimeter road encircled the landing area. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, permanent runway illumination, a beam approach system and a visual Lorenz system for night operations. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstand and at the SE corner. Infrastructure: there were 2 very large hangars on the N boundary with 3 and 2 wings, respectively, projecting from the back of them and probably housed workshops. An engine testbed was to the rear of the hangar at the E end, and a very wide servicing hardstand covered the entire area in front of the hangars. The former airport terminal building at the NW corner was probably used for admin offices, meteorological and communications services. The control tower was in front of the terminal building, barracks and stores buildings were 180 meters behind the terminal and additional barrack huts were on the S boundary and off the NE corner. A branch rail line served the buildings and hangar area along the NW corner and N boundary. Dispersal: area West, South, Southwest and Southeast with a total of 25 aircraft shelters and 6 parking hardstands. Defenses: only 1 light Flak position with a single gun was detected on 30 Oct 43. The airfield relied instead on the heavy Flak defenses

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 around Stuttgart. Light Flak for the airfield was undoubtedly augmented in 1944. Remarks: industry, oil and transportation targets at Stuttgart were bombed frequently by both the RAF and the USAAF, beginning 24/25 August 1940. 15/16 Mar 44: Stuttgart area bombed by 863 heavy bombers from RAF Bomber Command – 4 x Bf 110s from NJG 102 and 1 x Si 204 A-1 from FFS B 20 destroyed on the ground. 13 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 1 x Fw 190, 1 x Bf 109, 1 x Bf 110, 4 x He 111s, 1 x Ju 88, 1 x Ju 52 and 3 x trainers destroyed, plus 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x He 111 damaged. 14 Aug 44: airfield bombed by 74 8th AAF B-17 Fortresses – 3 x Bf 110s and 1 x F- 156 from I./NJG 6 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 5 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Bf 110, 5 x He 111s, 1 x He 177, 1 x Ju 52 destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109, 1 x Me 410, 5 x He 111s, 1 x Ju 52, 1 x glider and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 9 Dec 44: airfield bombed by 25 8th AAF B-17s. 13 Mar 45: strafed by approx. 8 P-47s – 6 x Bf 109s, 3 x Fw 190s, 1 x Bf 110 and 1 x He 111 slightly damaged; buildings and barracks shot up, 1 x 3.7cm Flak gun hit; 2 KIA and 3 WIA. (German report) 19 Mar 45: strafed – 13 x Bf 109s, 2 x Fw 190s, 1 x Ju 188 and 2 x Bü 181s damaged. (German report) 23 Mar 45: bombed and strafed by 4 P-47s – 3 x Bf 109s damaged. (German report) 20 Apr 45: Stuttgart area taken by French troops. Operational Units: 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (1939-40)?; II./KG 51 (Jun 40); Stab, I./St.G. 3 (Dec 40 – Jan 41)?; I./St.G. 2 (Dec 41 – Jan 42); II./NJG 6 (Oct 43 – Sep 44); Luftbeobachtungsstaffel 7 (Oct 43 – Jul/Aug 44); Stab, IV./JG 53 (Dec 44 – Apr 45); I./NJG 11 (Jan-Apr 45); Kdo. Olga of I./KG 200 (Jan-Apr 45). School Units: Fliegerschule d.Lw. (S) (Jun – Oct 41); III./NJ-Schule 1 (Nov 42 – Mar 43); III./NJG 101 (Mar – Dec 43); II./NJG 102 (Dec 43 – Jun 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./NJG 1 (Mar – Oct 41); Erg.Gr./NJG 1 (Oct 41 – Oct 42). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Echterdingen (to Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 3/VII (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/VII (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Nachtjagdraumführer 108 (Jul 42 – c.May 44); Werft-Abt. 8/VII (1944); Werft-Abt.(v) 108/XII (1944-45); Stab IV.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Rgt. 205 (c.Apr 43 – 1943/44); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 1/XIII (summer 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 7/VII (Dec 41). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.376-80 (12 Dec 43 updated to 24 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Eckfeld (GER) (50 07 04 N – 06 50 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Rheinland-Pfalz 28 km NE of Bitburg and 15 km N of Wittlich. History: listed as operational in Jan 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Edelbeuren (GER) (48 06 06 N – 10 00 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Wurttemberg 33.5 km S of Ulm and 16.5 km E of Biberach. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Egelsbach (GER) (49 57 35 N – 08 39 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Hesse 11 km N of Darmstadt. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 25/VII RheinMain (1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werftkdo. (o) 103/XI (Dec 44); Werkstattwagenzug (Fl) 6/XIV (Dec 44). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Eggebek (GER) (54 37 00 N – 09 21 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 22.4 km NE of Husum in Schleswig-Holstein, 20 km SW of Flensburg, 17.6 km NW of Schleswig and just SW of Eggebek. History: believed to have been built after the war started and not operational until 1943. Dimensions: approx. 1510 x 1465 x 1325 meters (1,650 x 1,600 x 1,450 yards). Runways: had 3 paved runways in the form of a triangle measuring 1,280 meters, 1,190 meters and 1,190 meters. Had a beam

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 approach system and was equipped for night landings. All runways were interconnected by a network of taxiways. Infrastructure: servicing facilities were available. Had a medium hangar at the NE corner with a tarmac apron and a motor pool and garages behind the hangar. The entire N boundary was fronted by 26 ladder-type servicing platforms or tarmac slabs. Barracks, quarters and stores huts were off the NE corner on the outskirts of Eggebek. Several additional clusters of huts were on the S boundary and off the NW corner. In fact, the airfield had an unusually large number of small buildings, huts and sheds. There were two munition storage areas, the main one off the SE corner. A branch rail line ran to the N boundary and the main barrack area. Dispersal: 27 large blast bays off the NW corner in Mar 44, of which 10 had camouflage netting. Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Treia (GER) (54 32 35 N – 09 18 15 E). Dummy 16 km ENE of Husum airfield, 15.4 km WNW of Schleswig/Land airfield, 11.3 km N of Olderup airfield, 8.5 km SW of Eggebek airfield and 3.25 km N of the village of Treia. Mock-up included 4 dummy hangars in a row on the N side along with some dummy aircraft parked nearby. The field was probably illuminated. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.621 (1944)] Remarks: 18 Sep 44: low-level attack – 3 x Ar 96 B-7s and 4 x Bf 109 G-6s from JG 102 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 13 Apr 45: strafed by the 56th Fighter Group with P-47 Thunderbolts using the new T-48 .50-cal. ammunition – the group claimed 95 Luftwaffe aircraft destroyed and 82 more damaged at Eggebek for a total of 177. Most of the claims were for He 111s and Ju 88s, but there were also many Bf 110s,Bf 110s, Me 210s, Me 410s, Fw 190s and unidentified types. Also claimed a hangar. 8May 45: upon the surrender of German forces, the airfield was packed with 243 aircraft, mostly Fw 190s, He 111s, Ju 87s and Ju 88s. Operational Units: II./SG 3 (Apr-May 45); II./KG 4 (May 45); III./KG 200 (May 45); 1. Tiefangriffsgruppe Bücker 181 (May 45). School Units: 2., 5./JG 102 (Sep 44 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 2./Erg.JG 1 (Feb 45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 3/XI (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Maj. Emil Allmendinger ( ? ? ) 1/45. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Wetterberatungsstelle Eggebek (8 May 45); Werft-Abt.d.Lw.(v) 108/XI (1944-45); 14. Flugzeug-Wartungs-Kp. (half) (8 May 45); le.Flak- 152 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Battr. 38/XI (8 May 45); Schnellbau-Kp. d.Lw. 1 (8 May 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 487/IV (8 May 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 5/VII (8 May 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 126/VII (8 May 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 192/XIII (8 May 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.141-43 (23 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; Air Division Intelligence Summary No. 1; web site ww2.dk] Eggersdorf (GER) (52 28 50 N – 14 05 30 E) General: landing ground and practice field (Landeplatz and Arbeitsplatz) 47 km E of Berlin, 13 km N of Fürstenwalde and 1.2 km WNW of the village of Eggersdorf in Brandenburg. History: laid out during 1938-39. Used as a practice field for trainers to mid-1944 and then by fighters and ground-attack aircraft to Apr 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 825 x 685 meters (900 x 750 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: had 1 medium hangar with a paved apron off the N corner with a workshop building nearby. A building on the NE boundary may have been used for airfield flight control. The nearest rail connect was at Müncheberg, 4.5 km NE of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Remarks: none. Operational Units: II./JG 77 (Oct-Nov 44); 10.(Pz)/SG 1 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); 10.(Pz)/SG 3 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); I./SG 9 (Jan 45); Pz.Aufkl.Schwarm 1 (Mar-Apr 45); IV./JG 51 (Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 41, FFS A/B 41 then FFS A 41 (Frankfurt/Oder) (1939-45); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C Fürstenwalde (Nov 39 – Jan 40) then FFS C 10 (Jan 40 – Jul 44). Station Commands: Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 22/III Fürstenwalde (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.582 (14 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ehingen (GER) (c. 48 17 02 N – 09 43 52 E) General: tactical airstrip (Gefechtslandeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 23 km SW of Ulm. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: III./KG 55 (May 40). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 22.(Flum.Leit)/Ln.Rgt. 205 (Altbierlingen) (May 43 – Aug 44); Stab I.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.Rgt. 227 (Sep 44 – Apr 45). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 153 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Ehmen (GER) (52 24 04 N – 10 41 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Lower Saxony 18 km NE of Braunschweig and 7 km WSW of Wolfsburg. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ehringerfeld (GER) (a.k.a. Eringerfeld) (51 35 20 N – 08 27 05 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in North Rhine – Westphalia 12 km SE of Lippstadt. History: adjacent to Störmede airfield and able to use its runway. 1945 in construction. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Eichwalde (GER) (a.k.a. Labiau) (54 50 30 N – 21 08 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) 42 km NE of Königsberg (Kaliningrad) in the former East Prussia, 3.25 km SE of Labiau (today Polessk) and immediately W of the village of Eichwalde. History: laid out in 1939-40 and initially served as a practice field for trainers. Had some use in June 1941 as the Luftwaffe transferred units east for the attack on the USSR and then reverted to custodial status until mid1944 when it became an active base for tactical reconnaissance aircraft. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Dimensions unknown, but probably allowed for take-off and landing runs of approx. 915 meters (1000 yards). No paved runway. Infrastructure: there were a few buildings with a hangar, workshop and admin building probably among them. The nearest rail connection passed by the airfield approx. 1 km to the north. Remarks: 24 Jan 45: important facilities demolished, airfield rendered unserviceable and then abandoned. Operational Units: KGr.z.b.V. 9 (Aug 39); III./KG z.b.V. 2 (Aug-Sep 39); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Apr-Jul 41); III./KG 1 (Jun-Jul 41); elements of II./KG 26 (Jan-Jun 44); III./TG 1 (Jul 44); III./SG 4 (Oct-Nov 44); Stab/NAGr. 4 (Oct-Dec 44); 1./NAGr. 8 (Oct-Dec 44);4.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 31 (Oct-Dec 44); Nahaufkl.St. 11./12 (Oct-Dec 44). Other: part of Kroat. Jagdgruppe 1 (Jul-Oct 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS Fürstenfeldbruck/LKS 4 (Königsberg-Neuhausen) (Nov 39 – Aug 40).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Eichwalde (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 8/I (Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 28/IV (Apr 41 – May 42?); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 259/III (1944 – Jan 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): schw.Feldwerft-Abt. d.Lw. 5/VII (Sep/Oct 44); le.Zug 10/Feldwerftverband 10 (Dec 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 85/VI (Jun 41). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.583 (24 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Einhausen (GER) (a.k.a. Lorsch) (49 38 35 N – 08 35 05 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Hesse 16 km E of Worms and 1.6 km SE of Lorsch. History: no information, but possibly set up at the beginning of 1940. Briefly used by fighters in fall 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 870 x 730 meters (950 x 800 yards). No paved runway. Infrastructure: none. Nearest rail connection in Lorsch. Dispersal: small woods along the boundaries provided cover for parked aircraft. Remarks: none. Operational Units: II./JG 53 (Sep-Oct 44). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.256 (7 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Einswarden-See (GER) (53 30 50 N – 08 31 00 E) General: seaplane station and factory airfield (Seeflugstützpunkt und Industriehafen) 4.8 km SW of Bremerhaven on the west bank of the Weser. History: used by the Weser Flugzeugbau firm for the design, production and repair of Dornier and Blohm und Voss flying boats, Heinkel floatplanes and even land-based aircraft such as the Ju 52 and Ju 87. Listed as still operational in Feb 45. Anchorage: had an approx. 1100 meter (1200 yard) take-off and landing run. Runway: had one large launching ramp fronting on a sheltered anchorage that could become ice-bound during the winter months. Infrastructure: fuel, water, compass swing and communications were available. There were 2 large hangars with adjacent workshop buildings, and 2 cranes at the S end of the waterfront. The numerous buildings of the Weser factory were just SW of the hangars. No barracks. the station and the factory were both served by a branch railway. Dispersal: 2 Tshaped aircraft shelters at the N end of the station. Defenses: protected by the same Flak positions that protected Blexen (see there). Remarks: Bremerhaven and Weser Flugzeugbau were bombed numerous times during the war. 4 Aug 44: Einswarden bombed by 14 B-17 Fortresses as a target of opportunity. Operational Units: none. - 155 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. Einswarden-See of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XI Oldenburg (1944). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.144-45 (6 Jan 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Eisfeld (GER) (50 25 25 N – 10 53 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Bavaria 18.5 km NNW of Coburg. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Elbing (GER) (today: Elblag) (54 08 30 N – 19 26 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 55 km ESE of Danzig (Gdansk) in the former East Prussia; airfield located 3 km SE of Elbing. History: Elbing was an old pre-war civil landing ground that was taken over by the Luftwaffe in the mid-1930’s and developed into a major training field and transit stop-off for aircraft on long distance flights to and from the Eastern Front. Also, bomber units were based at Elbing in 1939 and fighters were there in spring and early summer 1941. Dimensions: approx. 1145 x 1050 meters (1250 x 1150 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling facilities were on the S and SE sides of the airfield; underground bulk fuel storage was in the N corner immediately S of the airfield buildings. Infrastructure: there were a total of 9 hangars and large workshop type buildings, including 4 long rectangular hangars and a repair hangar (these 5 dating from World War I), all with paved aprons and all along the N corner and NE boundary. The base motor pool and garages were off the N corner and a number of smaller workshop buildings were with the hangars on the NE boundary. The airfield buildings comprising admin offices, barracks (not all of which were occupied), stores warehouses, etc., were in a compact group to the rear of the hangars off the N corner. Additionally, on the NE boundary were separate quarters for signals servicewomen (Blitzmädels). The nearest rail connection ran close to the N side of the field. Dispersal: a West dispersal, the only one, had a total of 1 large open, 2 medium open and 3 small aircraft shelters. This West dispersal may have been known as Elbing/West satellite airfield. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: - 156 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 10 Feb 45: Elbing taken by Soviet forces. Operational Units: Stab/KG 3 (May-Oct 39); I./St.G. 1 (Sep 39); 3./NAGr. 12 (Apr-Aug 43). School Units: Schule/FAR 33 (Nov 39 – Mar 41); FFS A/B 123 (Mar – May 41); FFS A/B 51 (Jan 42 – Feb 43); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 125 then FFS A 125 (Neukuhren) (1941-44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 21 (Białystok) (Sep 41 – Nov 43). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Gr./JG 52 (May – Jul 41). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Elbing (1941); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 12/I (1943 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/I (Apr 44 – Feb 45); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 212/I (Jan 45)?. Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Christian Gross ( ? - 3 May 41). Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Koflug 5/VI (Apr-Jul 41); Koflug 2/I (1944); Werft-Abt. 11/I (Dec 44); Werft-Kp. 54 (Nov 43, Mar 44); Flieger-Werkstattzug (mot) 10 (May 41); Frontreparaturbetrieb GL 3751 (Mar 42); gem.Flak-Abt. 211(v) (1939); part of le.Flak-Abt. 93 (mot.) (1945); Stab/Hei.Flak-Abt. 24/I (1943-45); Stab/Hei.Flak-Abt. 316/I (1944-45); 2./Flak-Rgt. 21 (gem. mot.) (1939); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 1/I (1943-45)?; s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 207/I (1943-45)?; s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 214/I (1943-45)?; s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 217/I (1943-45)?; s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 232/I (1943-45)?; s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 233/I (1943-45)?; 3./Ln.Flugmelde-Rgt. 91 (Apr 44); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 102/VI (Jan 45)?; Kraftfahr-Ausb.Abt. 1 d.Lw. (1941-44); Flugzeug-Bergungstrupp 2/XII (May 41); Flugzeug-Bergungstrupp 11/XII (May 41); FlugzeugBergungstrupp 17/XII (May 41); Lw.-Sanitäts-Abt. 2/I. On 17 Dec 41: Werftzug z.b.V. 3; Traktorenzug 1/I; Kdr.d.Ldssch.Züge; 4.Zug of Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 2/I; Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 95/VI (Jun, Dec 41); Kraftfahr-Ausbildungs-Abt. d.Lw. 1 (1941-44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.584-86 (19 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ellrich (GER) (51 36 00 N – 10 40 40 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Thuringia 38 km SSE of Goslar, 14.5 km NW of Nordhausen and 1.6 km NNE of Ellrich village. History: in existence since at least 1937 and used exclusively by gliders. Deemed unsuitable for operational aircraft. Surface and Dimensions: uneven grass surface that was under cultivation in Sep 44. Measured approx. 730 x 365 meters (800 x 400 yards). Infrastructure: had 2 small hangars off the W boundary. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. - 157 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.588 (13 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Elsdorf (GER) (a.k.a. Elsdorf/Etzweiler) (50 54 00 N – 06 33 50 E). General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 22.7 km SW of Köln airfield, 4 km S of Elsdorf and immediately SE of Etzweiler. History: no evidence of use found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 730 x 825 meters (800 x 900 yards). Infrastructure: had a small group of buildings off the N boundary. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.628 (18 Jun 41); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Elvershausen (GER) (51 42 00 N – 10 06 00 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Lower Saxony 21 km NNE of Göttingen and 7.2 km E of Northeim. History: no known use prior to April 1944 or after that date either. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 915 meters (1,050 x 1,000 yards). Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: none known. Nearest rail connection 1.6 km S at Katlenburg-Duhm. Dispersal: none known. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.146 (1 Apr 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Emden (GER) (53 20 30 N – 07 07 43 E) General: airfield in Lower Saxony 5 km SW of Emden. History: 1927 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none of any significance noted. Station and Town Units (on various dates – not complete): 3. (Funkempf.)/Ln.-Funkhorch-Rgt. West (1942 – Oct 44). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Enkesen (GER) (51 34 15 N – 08 12 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 19 km SE of Hamm, 7.5 km E of Soest and 1.2 km WNW of Enkesen im Klei village. History: no evidence of use. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 640 x 230 meters (700 x 250 yards) Infrastructure: 8 blast bays for dispersed aircraft were cut into the edge of a woods to the NW of the landing area in 1944. No other structures. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.586 (19 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ensheim (GER) (49 13 00 N – 07 06 55 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Saarland 9 km ESE of Saarbrücken and 1.2 km NE of the village of Ensheim. History: built in 1936-37 as a civil landing ground. Luftwaffe aircraft were occasionally in and out but no units were stationed there. Surface and Dimensions: leveled grass surface with a circular shape and a diameter of approx. 777 meters (850 yards). Infrastructure: civil airport buildings were on the NW side. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.431 (4 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Erbenheim (GER): see Wiesbaden-Erbenheim. Erding (GER) (a.k.a. München-Erding) (48 19 10 N – 11 56 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 32 km NE of Munich in Bavaria and 3.25 km NE of Erding. History: identified as an emergency landing ground in the late 1920’s with work to build it out as a full airfield beginning in 1935. Ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. It was intended as an air equipment depot from its beginning and remained as such throughout the war. Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 1100 meters (1500 x 1200 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface on firm meadowland. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points on the S boundary. Ammunition dump not located. Infrastructure: had 3 large hangars off the S boundary plus 1 large repair hangar and 2 large regular hangars at the SW corner. A camp of huts used for accommodations was 2 km to the E on the SW outskirts of a small village. A cluster of storage sheds were off the SW corner and a square group of buildings 2.8 km NNW of the airfield probably belonged to the Luftzeugamt at Erding. A special rail line served the buildings off the SW corner of the airfield. Dispersal: had 3 small aircraft shelters off the NW boundary and 6 more were under construction in early 1944. Defenses: light Flak positions were on hangar roofs ond on the roofs of the buildings belonging to the Luftzeugamt. Remarks: 24 Apr 44: airfield bombed by 109 B-17 Fortresses.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 1 Mar 45: low-level attack by 10 VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – 7 x Bf 110s from Stabsstaffel/NJG 6 destroyed or damaged (German sources). 24 Mar 45: airfield bombed by 15th AAF heavy bombers – 4 x Bf 109s, 3 x Ar 96s, 1 x Ju 88, 1 x Bf 108 and 2 other aircraft slightly damaged; 5 KIA and 4 WIA. (German report) 16 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Bf 109s destroyed and 2 more damaged. 25 Apr 45: bombed by 296 9th Air Division medium bombers. Operational Units: Überführungsstelle Erding (1941-42); Überführungskdo. Luftzeuggruppe 3 (Aug 42); Gruppe Süd/Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (Sep 43 – 1944); Flugzeugschleuse Luftflottenkdo. 2 (1944); III./KG(J) 54 (Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 10./KG 51 (Apr-Dec 44); 13., 15., 17. and 3.(Eins.)/Erg.JG 1 (Feb – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. B Erding (1940); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 3/VII Neububerg (1944-45); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 4/VII (Nov 44). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftzeugamt Erding (later Luftzeugamt 1/VII); Werft-Abt. 17/VII (1944-45); FliegerGeräteausgabestelle (mot) 103/VII (summer 44); FliegerGeräteausgabestelle (Eis.) 52/XI (summer 44); Ln.Heimatreparaturbetrieb 3/VII ( ? – fall 44); Kfz.Beständelager d.Lw. 2/VII B (1943-45); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 121/VII (1944-45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 4/VII (summer 44); WehrersatzlagerAusbildungskdo. 1/VII (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.115-17 (20 Dec 43 updated to 1 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Erfurt-Bindersleben (GER) (50 58 40 N – 10 57 48 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 5 km W of Erfurt in Thuringia. History: construction began in 1933 and it was officially designated a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur on 1 October 1934 with the first aircraft arriving 8 days later. Aside from the training units there, it served mainly bomber formations until 1944 when it was taken over by fighter units. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 730 meters (1,000 x 800 yards). Surface and Runways: had 3 broad paved landing area approach tracks of 320, 290 and 210 meters in length respectively, paved hangar aprons and servicing hardstands, paved perimeter road and paved taxiways. Otherwise, grass surface. Fully equipped for night operations including a visual Lorenz system. Infrastructure: a major airfield with fuel, refueling points, communications, a small ammunition dump, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities available. Had 2 very - 160 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 large hangars along the SE boundary and 3 very large and 1 large hangar along the SW boundary. Separate workshops, admin and supply buildings were behind the hangars on the SW side. Numerous barrack blocks stretched along the entire S side of the airfield behind the hangar area. The motor pool and garages were off the center of the S boundary and the flying control (Flugleitung) building was between two of the hangars at the SW corner. Airfield served by a branch rail line. Dispersal: off the N boundary with 15 large open aircraft shelters and 34 small open shelters. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 20 Jul 44: bombed by 11 B-24 Liberators as a target of opportunity – 1 x C 445, 2 x Fw 58 B-2s and 2 x Ju 86Es from Ln.-Schule 5 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 20 Mar 45: strafed by approx. 15 P-47s – little damage to the airfield but 1 KIA and 15 WIA. (German report) Apr 45: German troops demolished much of what had not been destroyed in Allied air attacks. 12 Apr 45: airfield taken by U.S. forces where they found 60 wrecked or burned out aircraft strewn around the field, mostly Bf 109 and Fw 190 fighters. Operational Units: II./KG 253 (Apr 36 – Apr 39); Stab, II./KG 4 (May-Sep 39); I./KG 2 (Oct-Nov 39); II./KG 1 (Jan-May 40); parts of IV./NJG 5 (Aug 43 – May 44); Stab, II./JG 300 (Aug-Sep 44); 9./ZG 26 (Sep 44); Stab, I./JG 3 (Oct-Nov 44); JGr. 10 (Mar 45). School Units: Luftnachrichtenschule 5 (1940-44); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 51 (Weimar-Nohra) (1939-40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E z.b.V. Erfurt (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 16/IV (c. Feb – Mar 40); as Fl.H. Erfurt-Bindersleben (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 33/IV (Dec 43); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 31/III (1944-45); Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Wolfgang Erdmann ( ? - Jan 40) 9/39; Oberst Hermann Clauditz (c. May 41 - 14 Jan 43); Oberst Karl Hummel (14 Jan 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Erfurt (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 4/IV (Apr-Nov 41); Koflug 5/III (Dec 41 – Apr 45); 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 4 (1939); 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 4 (1939); WerftAbt. 10/III (Dec 44); Werft-Abt. 104/IV (Feb-Mar 45); schw.Flak-Abt. 225(o) (mid-1940)?; Fluko Erfurt; Lw.-Bau-Btl. Erfurt (1939-40); EHafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Erfurt; E-Hafen-AusrüstungsKolonne (mot) 35/VI; Lw.-San.Abt. 5/III; Lw.-Einstellkdo. 8. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.147-50 (3 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] - 161 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Erfurt/Nord (GER) (51 01 30 N – 11 02 00 E) General: operational airfield and factory airfield (Einsatzhafen and Industriehafen) in Thuringia 5 km N of Erfurt. History: dates from fall 1924 as the civil airport for Erfurt and by 1927 it had a very modern combination terminal, hangar and airport administrative offices. Additional office space was built in 1934. Civil operations ended on 26 August 1939 and the Luftwaffe took over the airfield that October and added even more buildings. During the war years it served training units and was a major repair facility for the firms Reparaturwerk Erfurt (later renamed Mitteldeutsche Metallwerke Erfurt) and Motorenfabrik Otto Schwade & Co. The principal aircraft repaired or otherwise worked on were the He 177, He 111, Bf 109 and the prototype Ta 154. The field was used for workshop test flights. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 915 meters (1100 x 1000 yards) and rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: firm, level and well-drained grass surface with a gravel sub-soil. No paved runway. A perimeter road encircles the landing area and there was a large rectangular servicing hardstand immediately N of the hangar at the SE corner. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstand. Infrastructure: had 1 medium flight hangar with paved apron at the SE corner that was used by Luftnachrichtenschule 5 at ErfurtBindersleben. A number of small sheds just S of the hangar were probably workshops. A broad taxi track connected the airfield with the hangars and shops of the repair facility located off the S boundary. The repair facility centered around a very large double hangar with Eshaped extensions containing technical offices and workshops. Other major buildings included a medium hangar, component stores, workshops, offices, garages, etc. A group of barrack huts were on the N boundary and a group of school buildings off the S boundary. A branch rail line served the repair facility buildings. Dispersal: there was just one – West dispersal is a small woods off the W boundary that had 22 aircraft parking stands. Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Erfurt-Mittelhausen (GER) (51 02 30 N – 11 02 10 E). Dummy 7.25 km N of Erfurt, 3 km NNE of Erfurt/Nord factory airfield and 2 km E of the village of Mittelhausen. Mock-up consisted of phony buildings and hangars with fake aircraft parked along the W boundary. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.965 (1944)] Remarks: 20 Jul 44: bombed by 123 B-24 Liberators. 12 Apr 45: taken by U.S. forces. - 162 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: Wetterflugstelle Erfurt/Nord (later Wetterflugstelle 1558) (1944-45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 7 (Plauen); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 122 (Jena-Rödigen) (1941-42); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 114 then FFS A 114 (Weimar-Nohra) (1943-45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 32/IV (Jun 40 - ? ); as Fl.H. ErfurtNord (to 1943); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 31/III Erfurt-Bindersleben (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.587-91 (13 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Ergolding (GER) (48 34 05 N – 12 10 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Bavaria 58 km NE of Munich (München), 3.6 km NE of Landshut and 1.6 km S of Ergolding. History: dates from the late 1930’s and was used as a practice field for elementary flight training during the war years. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 915 meters (1100 x 1000 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface subject to softness during rainy weather. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in the NE corner and 3 underground storage tanks were nearby. The station ammunition dump was approx. 1150 meters to the NE with a paved road connecting it to the landing area. Infrastructure: a medium hangar with a paved hangar apron was at the NE corner. A group of barracks was off the NE corner and a large stores building was W of the hangar. A branch rail line ran to the stores building at the NE corner. Dispersal: no organized dispersal. Aircraft were parked along the boundary near the hangar. Defenses: none identified. Remarks: 16 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 23 destroyed or damaged, mostly Bf 109s and Fw 190s. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 13 (Neubiberg); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 121 then FFS A 121 (Straubing) (1940-45); Arbeitsplatz for LKS 11 (Sep 44 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Ergolding (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 3/VII (1940); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 18/XII Straubing (AprJun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 34/VII Straubing (1944); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 208/VII Landau/Isar (Nov 44). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.119 (7 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Eringerfeld (GER) (51 35 20 N – 08 27 05 E) - 163 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 3.25 km SSW of Störmede and 1.2 km W of the village of Eringerfeld. It adjoined the Southwest dispersal of Störmede airfield and might have been considered a satellite of Störmede had it been completed. History: construction began in late February/early March 1945 and was still in the early phase of development at the end of March. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 90 meters (1400 x 100 yards) with a planned extension to approx. 1600 meters (1750 yards). Surface and Runways: grass with a prepared surface. No paved runway. Infrastructure: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A/p.153 (29 Mar 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Erkelenz (GER) (51 05 04 N – 06 18 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine Westphalia 15 km SSW of Mönchengladbach. Exact location of the landing ground unknown, but possibly 8 km NW of the town of Erkelenz on the site where RAF Station Wildenrath was located after the war. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Erlangen (GER) (49 35 20 N – 11 01 40 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 16 km N of Nürnberg; airfield located 4 km S of Erlangen. History: a pre-war sports ground used by gliders. No record of use by the Luftwaffe. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.452 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Erzhausen (GER) (49 57 04 N – 08 37 53 E) or (51 53 04 N – 09 55 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) either in Hesse 19.5 km S of Frankfurt/M. and 8.5 km N of Darmstadt, or in Lower Saxony 30.5 km S of Hildesheim and 34 km W of Goslar. History: listed as operational in Feb 45, but no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Eschborn (GER) (a.k.a. Frankfurt-Eschborn, FrankfurtSossenheim) (50 08 00 N – 08 33 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Hesse 10 km WNW of Frankfurt/M. and 1.6 km SW of Eschborn. History: construction began in 1937 and included 5 large hangars and a flight operations building (Flugleitung), all of which were built of

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 stone. Eschborn was used mainly for the training of combat glider crews and replacement crews during the war and this continued to 9 Sep 44. Day fighter units began using Eschborn in Mar 44. Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 1000 meters (1,500 x 1,100 yards). Runway: grass surface. Perimeter lighting. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, water, ammunition, communications and other amenities were available. All of the hangars (see above) were fronted by a continuous tarmac apron for servicing aircraft. A cluster of barrack huts and a few other buildings were on the W outskirts of Eschborn village. Nearest rail connections at Eschborn and Sulzbach, both less than 1 km from the field. Dispersal: a remote dispersal area was located c.1.5 km from the NW corner of the landing area. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 15 Aug 44: bombed by 65 B-17 Fortresses – the station HQ was completely destroyed, 2 hangers, the vehicle garages and the fuel tanks hit, and the runway cratered. 27 Mar 45: airfield ordered immediately evacuated and destroyed. 30 Mar 45: airfield taken by U.S. forces, quickly restored to serviceability, designated airfield Y-74 and on 8 April became home base to the 367th Fighter Group. Operational Units: 4. DFS 230 Staffel (Apr-Sep 42); 1. (DFS)/Lw.Kdo. Don (Apr-Sep 42); II./JG 27 (Aug-Sep 43); II./JG 53 (Mar-May 44); part of I./JG 301 (May-Jun 44); II./JG 2 (Sep 44). School Units: 1./JG 106 (Mar – Aug 43). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Gruppe (S) 1 (Apr 42 – Sep 44). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 4/XII (Jan 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Eschborn of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 4/XII Wiesbaden-Erbenheim (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. Eschborn of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 20/VII Wiesbaden-Erbenheim (Jun 44 – Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.176-77 (18 Dec 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Eschede (GER) (52 41 50 N – 10 09 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Lower Saxony 9.6 km NE of Celle and 6.8 km SW of Eschede. History: built in 1939. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 915 meters (1,000 x 1,000 yards). Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: none known. A main rail line paralleled the SE boundary of the landing area. Dispersal: no organized dispersal areas. Defenses: unknown. Remarks:

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 11 May 44: Allied intelligence deleted Eschede from the airfields directory for Germany after deciding that it did not exist. Does not appear in German directories and lists either. Included here for the sake of completeness. Operational Units: none. Station Commands: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.151-52 (11 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Eschwege (GER) (51 12 00 N – 10 01 40 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 41.6 km ESE of Kassel in Hesse and 2.4 km NW of Eschwege. History: construction began on 1 October 1935 and the airfield was officially opened on 30 March 1936. Officially designated a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur on 1 October 1936. Existed mainly for the air park (Luftpark) there, but also used by bomber and short-range reconnaissance units to 1940. Wartime role was storage, aircraft maintenance training and aircraft maintenance replacement. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 1050 meters (1,000 x 1,150 yards). Runway: grass surface with paved hangar apron and perimeter road surrounding the landing area. Infrastructure: fuel, oil, water, ammunitions and communications available. The building area was at the S end of the field and consisted of 5 hangars including a large repair hangar, additional workshop buildings adjacent to the hangars, a flight operations building (Flugleitung), a motor pool with garages, supply buildings, barrack blocks, messes, station HQ and dispensary. A sports ground and swimming pool were sited on the W side of the landing area. A branch railway ran to the rear of the hangars and to storage warehouses at the SW corner of the airfield. Dispersal: a small area with 4 open aircraft shelters at the SE corner of the field. Defenses: a single tower for light Flak off the SSE boundary. Remarks: repeatedly bombed and strafed during the war beginning the night of 18/19 July 1940. 19 Apr 44: bombed by 53 B-17 Fortresses. 27 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x Ju 88 destroyed. 22 Feb 45: town marshaling yards bombed by 30 B-24 Liberators but some of the bombs fell on the airfield. 3 Apr 45: airfield taken by U.S. forces and a USAAF tactical reconnaissance group moved in on 9 April after repair work was completed. May 45: a photo at: http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/fotostrecke54868-3.html . - 166 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: II./KG 254 (Apr 37 – Mar 38); Stab, 1.(H), 2.(H), 4.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 23 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); II./KG 1 (Nov 39 – Jan 40); 3. (H), 5.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 23 (Dec 40 – Apr 41); Stab, 1., 2., 3./NSGr. 2 (Mar-Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Eschwege (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 25/VI (c. Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/VI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Maj. Siebel (fall 36 - Aug 38). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftpark Eschwege (fall 1936 - 1940); Feldwerft-Ers.Abt. (c.1941-45); NSFK-Gruppe “Mitte”; Ln.-Techn.Kp. (Bord) 1 (Jan 45); Ln.-Heimatreparaturbetrieb 4/VI (Wanfried, c.1942-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.154-58 (10 Jan 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Esperstedt (GER) (a.k.a. Bad Frankenhausen, EsperstedtKyffhäuser) (51 20 20 N – 11 11 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Thuringia 41.5 km N of Erfurt, 40.5 km N of Weimar, 34 km SE or Nordhausen and 1.2 km SE of the village of Esperstedt. History: built 1938-39. Used as a practice field for trainers during the war, and then also as a fighter field in fall 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1100 x 1100 yards) and almost square in shape. Infrastructure: had 2 medium hangars with nearby workshops off the NW corner. Other workshop-type buildings were located off the NE corner and on the S and W boundaries. A small group of barracks was off the NW corner and the station ammunition dump was off the SE corner. A branch rail line served the NW and SE corners. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Remarks: 9 Feb 45: low-level attack by some 16 VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 33 x Fw 190s, 1 x Bf 109, 4 x Me 410s and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Fw 190s, 2 x Bf 110s and 1 x Me 410 damaged. According to German reports, 5 x Ju 188, 26 x Fw 190, 4 x Bf 110, 2 x Bü 181, 2 x Fw 44 and 1 x Fw 56 were destroyed, a hangar (Junkerhalle) hit and burned out, 1 KIA and 1 WIA. Operational Units: I./JG 300 (Aug-Sep 44); III./JG 3 (Sep-Nov 44); III./JG 4 (Nov 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 122 (Jena-Rödigen) (194142); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 42 (Langensalza) (1942-43); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 114 then FFS A 114 (Weimar-Nohra) (1943-45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stab and IV./Erg.JG 2 (Jan – Mar 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Esperstedt (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 13/IV (c. Feb – May 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 21/IV (1941); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 32/III Nordhausen (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Fliegerergänzungsdivision (Jan-Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.592 (14 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Esselbach (GER) (49 51 05 N – 09 31 55 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 30 km WNW of Würzburg and 10 km N of Wertheim. The landing ground may have been 2 km SSE of the village of Esselbach. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Essen (GER) (51 28 N – 07 00 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Commands: Luftverteidigungskdo. 4 (Dec 38 – 1940). Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 44(o) (as Flakgruppe Essen (Sep 39 – Apr 45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 144(o) (Aug 40)? Flak-Abt.: le.74 (mot.); le.93 (mot.); schw.134(o); schw.213(o); schw.227 (Eisb.); schw.233(o); schw.234(o); schw.278 (Eisb.); schw.321(o); gem.341(v); schw.353(o); schw.423 (Eisb.); schw.430 (Eisb.); gem.441(v); gem.442(v); schw.443(o); schw.444 (Eisb.); schw.462(o); schw.535 (Eisb.); schw.542(o); schw.623(o); schw.642(o); le.718(o); le.741(v); le.742(o); le.743(o); le.744(v); le.745(o); le.746(o); le.747(o); le.748(o); le.749(o); le.750(v); le.826(o); le.841 (mot.). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 248(o); 448(o). Luftsperr-Abt.: 103(o). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 14 (E-Kray, 1944); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 20 (E-Kray, 1942 – Aug 43); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 23 (1944-45); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 25 (Jan 40 – 1942); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 29 (1943-44). Medical Services (Sanitätsdienste): Lw.-Lazarett 8/XI (EKupferdreh, Aug 44 – Apr 45); Feldlaboratorium (mot) d.Lw. 5 (EKupferdreh, Dec 44 – Apr 45). Essen-Mülheim (GER) (51 24 29 N – 06 56 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in North Rhine – Westphalia 6 km SW of Essen in the Ruhr and 4.8 km SE of Mülheim.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 History: built in 1926 as the civil airport for Essen. Classified in 1932 as an international airport with a customs office. Extended to the SW in 1940. Used for training and by operational fighter and bomber units to mid-1940, and then once again beginning in fall 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1650 x 870 meters (1,800 x 950 yards). Runways: 4 paved runways measuring 1,600 meters (complete and serviceable), 1,280 meters (incomplete – 825 meters serviceable), 1,280 meters (incomplete – 1,190 meters serviceable) and 412 meters (incomplete and unserviceable) as of Dec 44. Otherwise, grass surface on clay subsoil. Equipped for night landings, including a visual Lorenz system. Infrastructure: fuel, water, ammunition, communications and other amenities were available. Had 1 very large and 2 medium hangars with separate workshop buildings behind them. All of the hangars had paved aprons in front. The flight control building (Flugleitung) with adjacent admin offices was on the NW side of the landing area. Nearest rail connection in Mülheim. Dispersal: areas along the E side of the airfield and off the SE boundary with a total of 16 open aircraft shelters plus 5 parking hardstands. Defenses: details on Flak positions not found. Remarks: 1940-45: Essen bombed many, many times at night by the RAF with some of the bombs invariably falling on the airfield. 23 Oct 44: bombed during the early evening – 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x Bf 110 destroyed, hangar and fire apparatus burned out by incendiaries. 24 Dec 44: bombed by approx. half of 338 RAF Bomber Command heavy bombers that staged a daylight attack on Essen-Mülheim and Düsseldorf-Lohausen – 4 x Bf 109Gs from II./JG 77 destroyed; airfield reported unserviceable due to severe bomb damage on runway and taxiway; estimated repair time 4 weeks. Feb 45: airfield reported to still be severely damaged and under repair. 20/21 Mar 45: bombed by 90 B-24 Liberators – runways, station HQ and barracks all hit, power and telephone service cut; at least 8 KIA and several wounded; airfield rendered unserviceable. (German reports) 24 Mar 45: airfield ordered immediately evacuated and destroyed. 10 Apr 45: city occupied by Allied forces. Operational Units: III./JG 26 (Nov 39 – May 40); 4./JG 27 (Apr-May 40); I.(Jagd)/LG 2 (May 40); II./KG 51 (Jan-Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Essen (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 10/VI (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 11/VI (1944-45); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 233/XI (c.Oct 44 – Mar 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): elements of schw.Flak-Abt. 233 (1942-43); elements of Ln.-Telegrafenbau-Abt. z.b.V. 8 (1945); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 185/VI (to Oct 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.159-62 (6 Dec 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ettinghausen (Ettingshausen?) (GER) (50 34 10 N – 08 52 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 15 km E of Giessen, 8.8 km WNW of Laubach and 2.4 km WNW of Ettingshausen. History: probably built in 1937, used by operational units during 193940, and then by trainers and gliders during the 1940 to 1944 period. Reactivated as a fighter field in Nov 44. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 825 meters (1,050 x 900 yards). Runway: grass surface with two paved starting platforms. Infrastructure: 2 small portable hangars off the SW boundary and a small cluster of workshops off the NE corner. A small group of barrack-type buildings was sited off the N corner and another off the SW corner. A munitions dump was probably located off the W boundary. A branch rail line served the NE and NW sides of the field. Dispersal: aircraft were parked in a woods off the SW boundary in June 1944. Defenses: details on Flak positions unknown. Remarks: 5 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-38s – claimed 5 x Ju 88s, 1 x Bf 109, 6 x Bf 110s, 5 x Me 410 and 11 x Do 217s destroyed. 25 Nov 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 88s shot up and damaged. 24 Dec 44: bombed by 43 B-17 Fortresses and heavily damaged; urgent repairs underway. 11 Mar 45: bombed – runway and landing area cratered, airfield unserviceable for at least 4 days. (German report) Operational Units: III./KG 1 (Feb-Jun 40); III./JG 2 (Dec 44 – Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 72, FFS A/B 72 then FFS A 72 (Markersdorf) (1940-44); Arbeitsplatz for Segelausbildungsstelle für Flugzeugführerschulen A/B (Gelnhausen) (1941-44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Ettinghausen (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 13/XII (Mar 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 21/VII Giessen (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): le.Feldwerft-Staffel 5/40 (1 Jan 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.163 (6 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Euba (GER): see Chemnitz-Euba.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Eudenbach (GER): see Asbach. Euskirchen-Odendorf (GER) (50 39 00 N – 06 52 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in North Rhine – Westphalia 33.5 km SSW of Köln; airfield located 5.2 km ESE of Euskirchen and 1 km W of Odendorf. History: built in the late 1930s. Active during the 1940 campaign in the West. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 825 meters (1,200 x 900 yards). Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: fuel and munitions either on site or brought in as needed. Had 1 medium hangar off the SE corner with a tawiway to the landing area. Another building adjacent to the hangar was probably a workshop. There was a munitions dump between the N boundary and a railway track. A small barracks camp was located just E of the field on the outskirts of Odendorf. Nearest rail connect at Odendorf. Dispersal: no organized areas in January 1944, but there was ample aircraft parking space in fields surrounding the landing ground. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: Fall 44: rail and communications at Euskirchen bombed several times by USAAF heavy bombers. 8 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 3 x Ju 88s, 1 x Bf 109, 1 x Bf 110 and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 3 Jan 45: dispersal stands under construction along the edge of the landing area and a concrete runway at satellite field Ollheim (see there), about 3 km to the north, mentioned. 10 Jan 45: airfield bombed by 98 B-17 Fortresses. 5 Mar 45: Euskirchen taken by U.S. forces. Operational Units: 3.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 13 (Mar-May 40)?; 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 31 (Mar-May 40)? Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. B 27/VI (22 Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 228/XI (c.Dec 44 – Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.165 (9 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Eutingen (GER) (a.k.a. Thalheim, Talheim) (48 29 10 N – 08 46 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Baden-Württemberg 46.5 km SW of Stuttgart, 22 km WSW of Tübingen and 2 km ENE of the village of Eutingen. History: built in 1937 and was an operational base for units from the general mobilization on 26 Aug 39 through the attack in the West in May-Jun 40. Used as a practice field for flight school students after summer 1940.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1100 x 1100 yards) aligned ENE/WSW. Surface and Runways: grass surface with a hardened runway of 1000 meters that is probably not paved. Equipped with a flare path, perimeter and obstruction lighting for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: there were refueling points at the NE and SE corners of the landing area. The ammunition dump with a servicing track was approx. 1200 meters NE of the field. Infrastructure: had 1 medium hangar with a paved apron off the NW corner with adjoining buildings, some of which were probably workshops and others admin buildings. Groups of barrack huts were on both sides of the road to Göttelfingen beyond the NW corner. A light rail line served the buildings at the NW corner and continued along the N boundary. Dispersal: a North dispersal and a East dispersal had a total of 3 large open aircraft shelters at the end of Jan 44. Defenses: none identified in Jan 44. Satellites and Decoys: Dornhan (GER) (48 20 00 N – 08 30 45 E). Dummy 26 km SW of Eutingen airfield and 2 km S of Dornhan village. Mock-up included a c. 915 x 730 meter (1000 x 800 yards) landing area enclosed by boundary lighting with dummy aircraft parked towards the center of the area. Thought to be only a night decoy. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.437 (19 Feb 44)] Remarks: 24 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – 5 x Bü 181s and 4 x Fw 58Cs from FFS A 112 destroyed or damaged on the ground. VIII Fighter Command had a different score for this attack, claiming 5 x Bf 109s, 1 x Fw 190, 1 x Bf 110, 2 x Me 210s, 1 x Ju 87, 2 x Do 217s destroyed, plus 3 x Bf 109s, 1 x Bf 110, 1 x Me 210, 1 x Ju 87, 3 x Do 217s and 2 unidentified aircraft damaged. 19 Jul 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 4 x Do 217s, 1 x Ju 188, 1 x Bf 110, 1 x Me 410 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Do 217s and 1 x Ju 87 damaged. 22 Mar 45: strafed by fighters – 1 x Ar 96 destroyed and 1 x Ar 96 and 3 x Fw 190s slightly damaged. (German report) Operational Units: part of I./JG 51 (Sep-Nov 39); II./ZG 76 (Oct-Dec 39); II./JG 51 (Nov-Dec 39); I./JG 54 (Mar-May 40); III./KG 55 (MayJun 40). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 112 (Böblingen then Nellingen) (1941-44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 15 (Gablingen) (Oct 40 – Jan 43). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Eutingen (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 14/VII (1940); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/VII (c.Apr-Sep 44); - 172 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 216/XII (Sep-Oct 44)?; Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 234/VII Hailfingen (c. Oct 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Heimat-Flak-Battr. 29/IV (1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.118, 120-22 (30 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Eynern (GER) (a.k.a. Haus Eynern) (c. 51 18 N – 07 11 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 3 km N of Barmen (2.5 km NE of Wuppertal), which is 24.5 km SE of Essen/Ruhr. History: 1927 listed as a Notlandeplatz on a plateau and was used for that purpose until the end of the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

F Fallingbostel (GER) (52 50 10 N – 09 43 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Lower Saxony 37 km NW of Celle and 4 km S of Fallingbostel. History: used by civil aircraft in 1939 but no record of use by Luftwaffe flying units. Airfield listed as still operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 365 x 500 meters (400 x 550 yards). Infrastructure: none noted. Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): 18.(Flum.Leit)/Ln.-Rgt. 202 (Oct 42 – Aug 44); Lw.Feld-Div. 13 (Truppenübungsplatz Fallingbostel Nov-Dec 42); Fluko Fallingbostel/Ln.-Rgt. 232 (Sep 44 – Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.631 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fassberg (GER) (52 55 10 N – 10 11 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 32 km NNE of Celle in Lower Saxony. History: construction began at the end of 1933 with (initially) 3 hangars and a barracks camp. A bomber Gruppe and a bomber flying school began operating there in 1934 and in 1935 the airfield was enlarged, 9 more hangars build along with a large fuel storage tanks. Training at Fassberg was expanded to include observer/navigators, radio operators and gunners. A bombing range was set up in 1935-36 at Lutterloh, 10 km S of the airfield. A number of additional barracks were built in 1942 to accommodate personnel from FliegerTechn.Schule 2 who were soon to arrive, most of this work being done by 200 Russian POWs. Fassberg was extremely active right through to the end of the war as a station for refitting and resting operational - 173 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 units, re-equipping He 177 bomber Gruppen and carrying out conversion training. Dimensions: approx. 1510 x 1100 meters (1,650 x 1,200 yards). Runway: Grass surface with two parallel grass take-off and landing strips, one measuring 1,235 meters and the other 1,370 meters. Full night landing facilities including a beam approach system and visual Lorenz. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications, ammunition, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities available. Hangars (12) and numerous barrack blocks as noted above. A branch rail line served the W side of the airfield. Dispersal: areas East, Southwest and Northwest with a total of 1 covered aircraft shelter, 8 open aircraft shelters and 28+ aircraft blast bays in December 1944. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: Jan-Feb 44: a repair training and testing facility for Junkers JUMO and BMW jet engines was built 4 km NW of the airfield near the village of Dethlingen and camouflaged as a barn. Technical students previously billeted at the airfield were moved to new barracks in Dethlingen which were disguised as an agricultural equipment dealership. A similar offfield site for Me 163 rocket engine training was set up in Trauen, 4 km WNW of Fassberg. 15 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 2 x He 177s destroyed. 18 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 3 x He 177s and 1 He 111 destroyed, plus 2 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 22 Oct 44: Fassberg airfield personnel strength this date Flugplatzkdo. (908), Flieger-Techn.Schule 2 (1310), schw.FeldwerftAbt. z.b.V. (228), 6./KG 100 (246), le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 71/XI (143), I./FFS A 125 (610), I./SG 103 (395) for a total of 3,840. 4 Apr 45: 149 B-17 Fortresses unloaded 384 tons of bombs on Fassberg airfield. 7 Apr 45: bombed by 12 B-17s. 10 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Me 410s and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed. 13 Apr 45: demolition of what remained of the airfield and all of the 160 aircraft there commenced. 16 Apr 45: taken by advancing British troops. Operational Units: I./KG 154 (May 34 – Mar 36); KGr. z.b.V. 5 (AugOct 38); Schlachtfliegergruppe 30 (Aug-Sep 38); Schlachtfliegergruppe 40 (Aug-Sep 38); I./KG 1 (Oct-Nov 39); Stab, II./KG 1 (Oct 39 – Feb 40); Stab, II./KG 4 (Oct 39, Feb-Jun 40); - 174 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 III./KG 4 (Dec 41 – Jul 42); I./KG 40 (Jan-Dec 43, Jan-May 44); 8./KG 40 (Mar-Oct 43); 11./KG 40 (Dec 43 – Jan 44); II./NJG 4 (Jan-Feb 44); I./ZG 26 (Apr 44); I./KG 100 (May 44); part of III./KG 1 (JunAug 44); 1./NJG 11 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); I./LG 1 (Nov-Dec 44); Stab/NAGr. 6 (Apr 45). School Units: Bombenschule Fassberg (Jan – Apr 35); Kampffliegerschule Fassberg (May 35 – Sep 39); Flieger-Techn.Schule 2 (1943 – Apr 45); I./FFS A 125 (Aug 44 – Jan 45); I./SG 103 (Oct 44 – Apr 45); II./SG 103 (Apr 45); 5./SG 111 (Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Ergänzungs-Kampfstaffel Fliegerdivision 9 (Mar-Jun 40); Erg.St./KG 4 (Jun – Nov 40); Ausb.St./KG 4 (Dec 40 – Mar 41); IV./KG 4 (Apr – Jul 41). Station Commands: Fliegerhorstkommandantur Fassberg ( to Jan 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 29/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Fassberg (Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 205/XI) of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 21/XI Lüneburg (1944 – Feb 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Martin Fiebig (1 Mar 37 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 10. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 4 (Mar-Jul 41); schw.Feldwerft-Abt. z.b.V. 2 (Sep 44 – 1945); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 55/XI (1943-44); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 71/XI (1944-45); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 79/XI (1943-45); Lw.San.Staffel Fassberg. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.166-68 (13 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fehmarn (Land) (GER): see Puttgarden. Fehmarn (See) (GER) (a.k.a. Fehmarn-Marienleuchte) (54 29 40 N – 11 14 00 E) General: seaplane anchorage in Schleswig-Holstein located in the harbor 3 km S of the village of Burg on Fehmarn Island, which is located at the entrance to Kiel Bay. History: 1927 listed as an emergency alighting area (Notlandeplatz) for seaplanes. Either rare or no use by the Luftwaffe during the war. Anchorage: ample. Infrastructure: no information. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.968 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fehmarn-Staberhof (GER) (54 24 45 N – 11 18 30 E). General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 2 km E of the village of Staberhof near the SE corner of Fehmarn Island. History: no record of use by the Luftwaffe. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 455 x 175 meters (500 x 190 yards). Infrastructure: no information found.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.968 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Feldkirchen (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Riem airfield near München (Munich) - see there. Ferdinandshof (GER) (53 40 05 N – 13 54 04 E) General: practice field (Arbeitsplatz) in Mecklenburg 23-24 km SE of Anklam and 38 km N of Prenzlau. History: listed as still operational in Feb 45. Not believed to have been used by operational units. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 120 (Prenzlau) (1940-42). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ferschweiler (GER) (49 52 20 N – 06 23 25 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 22 km NW of Trier. History: built late 1939/early 1940 as a forward fighter strip for the attack in the West in May 1940 and then not used again until summer 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1145 x 410 meters (1250 x 450 yards) with a rectangular shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: none. Nearest rail connection 3.6 km SSW of the field. Dispersal: by mid-Aug 44, at least 20 aircraft bays had been cut into the woods along the N boundary of the landing area. Remarks: 14 Aug 44: being used by transport aircraft. Operational Units: III./JG 2 (May 40); I./JG 53 (May 40); I./Trägergruppe 186 (May 40); II./TG 1 (Aug-Sep 44). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.125 (5 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Finkenwerder (GER): see Hamburg-Finkenwerder. Finow (GER) (a.k.a. Finow-Mark) (52 49 30 N – 13 42 30 E) General: Fliegerhorst in Brandenburg 40.5 km NNE of Berlin, 6 km W of Eberswalde and 1.6 km SW of the village of Finow. History: airfield construction began after the war started and was still underway in 1941. It was home to a Luftzeugamt (main equipment depot) and flying units were not station there until early 1944 when unit of all types began using Finow. Dimensions: approx. 1785 x 915 meters (1950 x 1000 yards) and irregular in shape. It was being extended along the E boundary in Jul 44. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Had 2 concrete runways, 1050 meters (1150 yards) aligned E/W, and 960 meters (1050 yards) aligned NE/SW. A third paved runway that paralleled the E/W runway

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 was under construction in summer 1944. A perimeter road ran along the N boundary. Equipped with perimeter lighting and runway illumination. Fuel and Ammunition: both were available as needed. Infrastructure: on the N boundary were 3 large flight hangars, 1 medium flight hangar and 1 large repair hangar, all with paved aprons and interconnected by a broad taxi-track. Another hangar was under construction off the N boundary in summer 1944. Workshops were at the E end of the N boundary. A large storage hangar and numerous storage sheds were off the N boundary and the NW corner. There were 3 barrack complexes within 1 to 2.5 km of the airfield on the NW, N and NE sides. A branch rail line served the airfield buildings. Dispersal: had 14 open aircraft shelters along the perimeter of the landing area. A new Southeast dispersal area was under construction along the Finow-Biesenthal road in summer 1944. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: 2./NJGr. 10 (Jan 44); I./KG 200 (Mar 44 – Apr 45); Kampfstaffel/Erprobungskdo. 25 (Jul-Aug 44); 5.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); Stab/FAGr. 2 (Jan-Apr 45); 1./NAGr. 8 (Jan-Apr 45); Stab, II./SG 3 (Feb-Apr 45); Verbindungsstaffel II. Fliegerkorps (Mar 45); Stab, III./JG 3 (Apr 45); 1. Tiefangriffsgruppe Bücker 181 (Apr 45). School Units: FFS B 3 (Aug 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./KG 76 (Feb – Aug 44); Erg.-u.Ausb.St./KG 200 (Feb 44 - ? ); 13./SG 151 (Feb – Mar 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Finow (to c. Sep 43); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 24/III Jüterbog-Waldlager (1944); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 28/III Werneuchen (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/II. Fliegerkorps (Biesenthal, Feb-Mar 45); Luftzeugamt 1/III (c. 1939-45); Werft-Abt. 11/III (1944-45); le.Feldwerft-Zug 6/70 (Feb 45); mittl.FlakBttr.z.b.V. 6540 (Jun-Dec 44); Flak-Bttr.z.b.V. 14080 (Feb 45); Startbahnbau-Ers.Abt. (c.1942-44); Lw.-Festungs-Btl. VII (Sep 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.593-98 (1 May 44 updated to 7 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Finsterwalde (GER) (51 36 30 N – 13 44 20 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 104 km SSE of Berlin, 45 km WSW of Cottbus in Brandenburg; airfield located 3.6 km SSE of Finsterwalde. History: construction began in late 1934 or early 1935 and it was named a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Home station for pre-war bomber units and then became a training station for multi-engine schools. Fighter and ground-attack units used Finsterwalde from mid-1944 to the end of the war. - 177 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 915 meters (1100 x 1000 yards) and roughly square in shape. Surface and Runways: level grass surface. No paved runway, but had paved taxiways and a large servicing hardstand in front of the hangars on the S side of the airfield. Equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstand, inside the N boundary and at the NW corner. A small ammunition dump was at the NE corner and connected to the landing area by a loop road. Infrastructure: had 7 large hangars arranged in a curved row along the S edge of the landing area and all with paved hangar aprons. Close to the eastern-most hangar at the SE corner were 3 or 4 workshop buildings. A large concentration of admin offices, barracks and other station buildings were in a woods immediately behind the hangars off the S boundary. A small cluster of huts, possibly used for storage, was off the SW boundary. The flight control building was almost certainly at the SE corner. A branch rail line served the hangar area on the S boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities in Mar 44. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: no evidence of Allied bomber raids on Finsterwalde airfield found. 11 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – 5 x Ju 86Es and Gs from Ln.-Schule Halle destroyed or damaged on the ground. 20 Apr 45: reached by forward elements of Soviet 13th Army. Operational Units: II./KG 153 (Oct 35 – Apr 39); II./KG 3 (May 39); II./KG z.b.V. 1 (May 41); 3./NJGr. 10 (Jan 44 - ? ); I./KG 200 (FebSep 44); Stab/JG 11 (Aug-Sep 44); Stab, II./JG 300 (Sep-Oct 44); II./JG 27 (Sep 44); II./JG 5 (Oct 44); IV./JG 4 (Oct-Nov 44); 12. (Pz.)/SG 9 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); Stab, II., III./SG 2 (Jan 45); 10. (Pz.)/SG 2 (Jan 45); I./JG 301 (Jan-Feb 45); 1.(Pz.)/SG 9 (Feb 45); III./TG 3 (Feb-Mar/Apr 45). School Units: FFS C Finsterwalde (Nov 39 – Jan 40) then FFS C 7 (Jan 40 – Apr 43); Arbeitsplatz for Bordfunker from LNS Halle/Saale (Jul 43 – 1945). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 3.(Erg.)KG 200 (Feb – Jul 44); Stab and II./SG 151 (Feb 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 42/IV (Oct 42 – Jan 43); as Fl.H. Finsterwalde (to c. Sep 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 31/IV (Dec 43, Mar 44); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 22/III Fürstenwalde (1944); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 24/III (1944); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 101/I (c. Nov 44 – Feb 45). - 178 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Finsterwalde (Jul 39 – Dec 40); Werft-Abt. 12/III (1944-45); Werft-Abt. 14/III (1944-45); elements of Werft-Abt. 102/IV (1945); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 200 (Feb 44 - ? ); schw.Feldwerft-Abt. IV/20 (Mar 45); Werft-Kp. 40/IV (n.d.); Lw.-Bau-Btl. Finsterwalde (1939-40); E-HafenAusrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Finsterwalde; Stab/Lw.-Berge-Btl. II (MarApr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.599-601 (27 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Finsterwalde-Heinrichsruh (GER) (51 38 15 N – 13 14 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Brandenburg 2.5 km W of Finsterwalde and 1.2 km SW of the village of Heinrichsruh. History: used for glider training during the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 640 x 775 meters (700 x 850 yards) and roughly square in shape. Infrastructure: had a shed on the E boundary that was fronted with a small servicing hardstand. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.957 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Finthen (GER): see Mainz-Finthen. Fischbeker Heide (GER) (53 27 45 N – 09 49 20 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) and glider field 16 km SW of Hamburg city center between the villages of Wulmstorf and Neugraben-Fischbek. History: a Hitler Youth glider training school since 1935. Surface and Dimensions: uneven heathland with a diagonal run of approx. 550 meters (600 yards). The field was unsuitable for operational aircraft. Infrastructure: had workshops, classrooms and a single small hangar. Several clusters of barracks lying close to the landing area were probably used by the school. Operational Units: none. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.588 (7 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fischhausen (GER/RUSS) (a.k.a. Primorsk) (54 44 N – 20 00 E) General: landing ground or seaplane anchorage in the former East Prussia 12 km NNE of Pillau (Baltiysk). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Flacht (GER) (50 21 03 N – 08 02 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 4 km SSW of Limburg and possibly a satellite of Limburg-Linter airfield. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Flamersheimerswald (GER) (50 37 N – 06 50 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in W Germany c.7 km SE of Euskirchen that was under construction on 3 January 1945 with the development of aircraft parking sites and fuel storage installations. Probably never completed or used as this area was taken by U.S. forces about 5 March 1945. [Sources: chronologies; AFHRA, BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Flammersfeld (GER): see Asbach/Eudenbach. Flatow (GER) (a.k.a. Zlotow) (c. 53 21 N – 17 02 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania 32 km NE of Schneidemühl (Pila). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Flechum (GER) (52 42 11 N – 07 32 48 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Lower Saxony 27 km W of Quakenbrück, 15 km NNW of Vechtel and 13 km NNE of Drope airfield. Possibly an alternate landing ground for these other three airfields. History: listed as operational in Oct 43 but not of the lists for 1944 or 1945. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: note noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Flensburg (GER) (54 47 33 N – 09 25 43 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 66(o) (as Flakgruppe SchleswigHolstein) (mid-43 – Jun 44). Flak-Abt.: schw.306(o); le.742(o); le.755(v); le.828(v); le.876(o). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 208(o); 609(o). Flensburg-Mürwik (GER) (c. 54 49 03 N – 09 27 22 E) General: seaplane anchorage in Schleswig-Holstein 3.2 km (or 7 km?) NNE of Flensburg. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing place (Notlandeplatz) for seaplanes. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 180 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Flensburg-Weiche (GER) (a.k.a. Flensburg-Schäferhaus) (54 46 30 N – 09 22 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 4 km SW of Flensburg in SchleswigHolstein. History: dates from 1911 and used as a military airfield during World War I. It became a civil airport in 1926 with a single hangar and was then taken over by the Luftwaffen in the mid-1930’s and built out to a well-equipped air base with numerous hangars, barracks and other buildings. An important and active airfield during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 1005 meters (1,400 x 1,100 yards). Runway: had 3 intersecting concrete runways in the form of a triangle, all of which measured 1,190 meters in length. Otherwise, grass on gravel subsoil. Additionally, there were 3 separate ladder-type aircraft servicing areas with a total of 42 tarmac hardstands. Equipped for night landings. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications, ammunition dump, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. Hangars and barracks as noted above. A branch rail line ran to the S side of the airfield. Dispersal: had a North area and a South area with a total of 43 open aircraft shelters in December 1943, of which 20 in the South area were covered with camouflage netting. Defenses: 5 heavy and 9 light Flak positions within 5 km of the airfield in Dec 43. All of the heavy positions had 4 to 6 guns and some of the light Flak positions had multiple guns and some were mounted in Flak towers. Satellites and Decoys: Flensburg-Wallsbüll (GER) (54 48 30 N – 09 15 30 E). Dummy 12 km WNW of Flensburg and 8.5 km WNW of Flensburg airfield. Mock-up included 2 dummy hangars on the N boundary, a group of long narrow sheds on the S boundary with a large letter “V” in front. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.610 (11 Nov 44)] Remarks: Flensburg city was bombed several times in fall 1942 by the RAF but the airfield apparently made it through to the end of the war without being targeted by the bombers. 15 Apr 44: low-level attack by 4 VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – 9 x He 111s from I./KG 26 shot up and destroyed on the ground. 13 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 6 x Bf 109s, 14 x Fw 190s, 1 x Bf 110, 2 x He 111s, 1 x Ju 88, 1 x Do 217, 21 Ju 52s and 1 x Fi 156 destroyed, plus 11 x Bf 109s, 11 x Fw 190s, 1 x Bf 110, 1 x Do 217, 10 x Ju 52s and 1 x Fi 156 damaged. 8May 45: upon the surrender of German forces, the airfield had an occupancy of 66 aircraft, mostly Bf 109s and Fw 190s.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: 2.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 10 (Apr 40); III./KG 1 (Nov 43 – Mar 44); Einsatzstaffel/KG 26 (Apr 44); II./KG 54 (Apr 44); 3., 4., 5./KG 66 (May-Jun 44); 3./KG 200 (Mar 45); Stab, II., III./SG 1 (AprMay 45); III./SG 3 (Apr-May 45); part of Fliegerstaffel des Führers (Apr-May 45); Kurierstaffel OKW (Apr-May 45); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Apr 45); I./SG 1 (May 45); Stab, I./JG 26 (May 45); I., II./JG 54 (May 45); NSGr. 3 (May 45)?; II./TG 3 (May 45). School Units: Ln.-Schule 6 (See) ( to – 1939); Fliegerschule d.Lw. (S) 2 (Jan 40 – Jul 41); Stab/JG 102 (Jul 44 – Mar 45); 4./JG 102 (Sep – Dec 44); II./JG 102 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); Luftdienstlehrkommando Flensburg (1942/43 – 1945). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Einsatzkommando Ju 88 (Pz.) (Aug 43)?; elements of I./Erg.JG 1 (Feb – May 45). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 20/XI (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 2/XI Leck (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Wetterberatungsstelle A(o) Flensburg (8 May 45); Stab III and 8/Feldwerftverband 30 (8 May 45); Stab II, Stab IV, 4, 5, 6, 10 and 11/Feldwerftverband 40 (8 May 45); Stab I, 2 and 3/Feldwerftverband 60 (8 May 45); Waffenprüfungszug 1/20 (8 May 45); Werft-Kdo.d.Lw. (o) 1/XI (8 May 45); 1. Flugzeug-Wartungs-Kp. (8 May 45); Lufttorpedo-Zug 12 ( ? – Jun 44); elements of Res.Flak-Abt. 613 (Sep 41); 1./le.Res.Flak-Abt. 762 (Sep 41); elements of le.Flak-Abt. 755 (1943-45); le.Heimat-Flak-Battr. 37/XI and an unnumbered le.FlakBattr. (8 May 45); 17./Ln.-Rgt. 351 (8 May 45); Lw.-Bau-Kp. 9/XI (Dec 39 - ? ); Flieger-Geräteausgabestelle (Eis) 51/IV (8 May 45); Ldssch.Zug 149/VII (8 May 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 120/XIII (8 May 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.169-75 (6 Feb 44 updated to 27 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; Air Division Intelligence Summary No. 1; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Forchheim (GER) (c. 49 43 33 N – 11 03 37 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Bavaria 30 km N of Nürnberg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Frankenhausen (GER): see Esperstedt. Frankenstein (GER) (a.k.a. Zabkowice Slaskie) (50 34 20 N – 16 50 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Silesia 61 km SSW of Breslau (Wroclaw) and 38 km WNW of Neisse (Nysa); landing

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 ground 2.5 km SE of Frankenstein. History: In use from at least 1927 to the end of the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 550 x 365 meters (600 x 400 yards). Infrastructure: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.968 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Frankfurt/Main (GER) (50 07 27 N – 08 40 31) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/II. Fliegerkorps (c.Oct 39 – May 40); Stab/6. Fliegerdivision (Feb-Sep 39); Stab/2. Fliegerdivision (Sep-Oct 39); Koluft Heeresgruppe C (Sep 39 – 1940). Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: Stab/II. Flakkorps (c.Oct-Dec 39); Stab/19. Flak-Brig. (Mar 45); Luftverteidigungskdo. 5 (Aug 39 – 1940). Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 29(o) (as Flakgruppe Frankfurt/Main) (1939 – 1945); Stab/Flakscheinwerfer-Rgt. 119(o) (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Frankfurt/Main) (Oct 41 – 1943); Stab/FlakRgt. 129 (mot.) (Jun 40); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 229 (mot.) (Dec 40 – Mar 41); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 652 (mot.) (Jun 42). Flak-Abt.: le.95 (mot.); schw.255(o); I./Flak-Rgt. 291 (Sep 39 - ? ); schw.291(v); gem.292(o); gem.293(v); gem.294(v); gem.295(v); schw.396(o); schw.435(o); schw.495(o); schw.631(v); gem.640(o); schw.681(o); le.685(v); le.715(o); le.856(o); le.857(o); schw.905(o); le.972 (ETr.); le.976(o); le.986(o)?; le.987(o). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 298(v); 519(o). Flak-Ers./Flak-Ausb.: Flak-Ers.Rgt. 2 (1942-43); Flak-Ers.Abt. 29 (Aug-Oct 39); Flak-Ers.Abt. 95 (Aug 39 – 1945); Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 15 (Sep 44 - ? ); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 31 (Jan 40 – 1941/42). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): parts of Ln.-Rgt. 102 (Oct 39 – May 40); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 13 (Königstein im Taunus, Nov-Dec 44); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 32 (May 40); 6.(Ers.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 12 (Jul 38 - ? ); 11.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 12 (1939-45); Lv-Nachr.Abt. 5 (Feb 40 – c.Sep 41); 2./Ln.-Abt. 141 (Frankfurt-Höchst, c.1943-45); Fluko Frankfurt/Main. Supply Services (Nachschubdienste): Munitionsausgabestelle d.Lw. (Oberhöchstadt – 1944); Nachschubbezirk d.Lw. 2/XII (May 43). Ground Transport (Transportkolonnen): Kfz.Ausgabe- und Sammelstelle d.Lw. 1/XII (Apr 42). Ground Defense and Security, etc. (Landesschützen, usw.): Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 167/XI (Oberursel, summer 44); Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 14/XVII (Oberursel, 1943-44).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Medical Services (Sanitätsdienste): Lw.-Lazarett 2/XII (c.193945); Lw.-Lazarett 3/XII (Hofheim am Taunus, c.1939-45); FliegerUntersuchungsstelle 2/XII (1944-45); Flieger-Untersuchungsstelle 2/XIII (Sep 43); Kleine Zahnstation d.Lw. 1/XII (Oct 44). Other (sonstige, verschiedene): KriegsgefangenendurchgangsLager d.Lw. Oberursel (Jan 40 – Apr 45); Lw.-Auskunftsstelle 1/XII (1943-45); Annahme- und Entlassungsstelle d.Lw. 2/VII (F-Höchst, 1944-45). Frankfurt/Oder (GER) (52 20 49 N – 14 32 06 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Stab/4. Flieger-Div. (Jan-Feb 45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 7 (mot.) (1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 35 (mot.) (1945); I./Flak-Rgt. 16(o) (1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 495(o) (Feb 45); I. (Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 231 (Sep 44 – spring 45); 13. (Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 3 (Jul 42); Flugmelde-Funk-Kp. z.b.V. 23 (Feb 45)?; Ln.-Kp. z.b.V. 4 (Feb-Apr 45). Frankfurt/Oder (GER) (52 20 15 N – 14 37 15 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Brandenburg 89 km ESE of Berlin, 5 km E of Frankfurt a.d. Oder and 2 km SSW of the village of Kunersdorf. History: a commercial airfield since 1928, it was taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1936. Airfield used for flight training from its inception to Jan 45, by operational aircraft during the attack on Poland in Sep 39, and as a repair and equipment center for Ju 52 transports during the mid-war years. In Jan 45, as Soviet forces advanced toward the Oder, ground-attack units began using the airfield. Dimensions: approx.. 1025 x 870 meters (1120 x 950 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. There was a rectangular hardstand located more or less in the middle of the landing area that measured approx. 410 x 260 meters (450 x 285 yards) and had narrow concrete extensions projecting outward from all four sides. This rather unique configuration provided take-off and landing runs of approx. 800 meters (880 yards) NW/SE and 775 meters (850 yards) NE/SW. Night flying capability probably existed. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were along the servicing hardstand in the S corner and in the E corner. Infrastructure: had 4 large and 1 medium hangar off the S corner together with adjacent workshop buildings, and 1 large repair hangar set back from the SW boundary. The main station buildings comprising admin offices, barracks, classrooms, etc., were located off the W corner. A second group of buildings that included the station HQ was situated off the SW boundary, and a small group of huts was off the E corner. A light rail spur off the Frankfurt/O. – Reppen line - 184 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 served the N, E and S sides of the field and terminated at the repair hangar. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities in Apr 44. Aircraft were parked along the E boundary and on the N side of the landing area. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 15/16 Feb 44: Frankfurt/O. bombed by 24 RAF Lancasters, but the airfield was not hit. 23 Apr 45: Frankfurt/O. taken by Soviet forces. Operational Units: II./ZG 1 (Aug 39); KGr. z.b.V. 102 (Jun 41); NSGr. 8 (Jan-Apr 45); III./SG 2 (Jan-Feb 45); II./SG 2 (Feb 45). School Units: elementary flight school Frankfurt/Oder (Jan 34 – Mar 39); Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 41 (1939-42); Schule/FAR 41, FFS A/B 41 then FFS A 41 (Apr 39 – Jan 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Flieger-Ers.Abt. 41 (Mar 39); Flieger-Ers.Btl. III (Apr 42 – 1945?). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Frankfurt/Oder (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 33/III (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 21/III (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates at or near the airfield or in the city – not complete): Werft-Abt. 13/III (1944-45); [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.602-03 (13 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Frankfurt-Rebstock (GER) (50 06 40 N – 08 37 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 5 km W of Frankfurt/M. city center. History: pre-war civil airport (Verhehrsflughafen) since long before the war and also a factory airfield (Industriehafen) from 1938, accommodating the Gerner-Flugzeugbau firm. Very limited Luftwaffe use between mid-1940 and mid-1942. Dimensions: approx. 1500 x 890 meters (1,640 x 970 yards). Runway: well-drained grass surface on loam subsoil. Entire landing area surrounded by a perimeter track. Infrastructure: fuel, water, ammunition, compass swing, communications and other amenities were available. Had 2 medium hangars along the S boundary with a long workshop-type building between them, and 1 medium hangar at the SE corner, all of these with tarmac hangar aprons. The admin buildings were grouped together at the center of the S boundary with the control tower at the E end. A barrack camp was S of the airfield and there was a cluster of huts at the SW end. The main Frankfurt – Mainz rail line paralleled the S boundary of the field. Dispersal: at the edge of woods on the E boundary with 6 covered and 14 open aircraft shelters (Feb 44).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: 2 heavy Flak positions with 6 guns each and 5 light Flak positions and towers, all within 2 km of the airfield (Feb 44). Remarks: 27 Mar 45: airfield ordered immediately evacuated and destroyed. Operational Units: Stab, I./JG 334 (Mar-May 37); 2.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Sep-Nov 39); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Aug 39 – May 40); Stab, I./JG 2 (Nov 39 – May 40); III./JG 2 (Apr-May 40); 4./Gruppe Süd (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (1943). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Rebstock (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 17/XII (Mar 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 9/XII Fhein-Main (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 25/VII Rhein-Main (1944). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 3./le.Flak-Abt. 987 (Mar 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.178-81 (11 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Frankfurt – Rhein-Main (GER) (50 02 40 N – 08 35 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 10.4 km SW of Frankfurt/M. city center. History: classified in 1932 as an international airport with customs office. In 1939-40 the two civil airship hangars were dismantled and the field taken over by the Luftwaffe. After the 1940 campaign in the West, consistent wartime use by bomber and transport units and then by fighter units from 1943. Became a USAF base and a large international airport again after the war. Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 1190 meters (1,500 x 1,300 yards). Runway: grass surface with sand surroundings. The landing area was equipped with beam approach, perimeter and obstruction lighting. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, water, ammunition, machine gun registration range, communications and other amenities were available. Had 1 very large hangar at NW corner, workshops adjacent to the hangar with more workshops and engine testing beds at the SE corner. A 2-story airport terminal building, a 6-story control tower and a building formerly used by customs and the police were at the NW corner. A small group of barrack-type huts and other buildings were just off the SE corner. A special branch rail line ran to the E boundary. Dispersal: 3 open aircraft shelters along the perimeter (May 44). Defenses: 1 x 6-gun heavy Flak position and 2 light Flak positions and towers were in the immediate vicinity of the airfield (Jan 44). Remarks: 10/11 Apr 43: bombed by RAF (target Frankfurt) – 300 incendary bombs hit the airfield causing considerable damage to a building.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 24 Dec 44: bombed by 143 B-17 Fortresses and heavily damaged; urgent repairs underway; 2 x Bf 109Gs from IV./JG 4 destroyed on the ground. 16 Mar 45: bombed – 5 x Fw 190s slightly damaged. (German report) 22 Mar 45: bombed by 109 B-17s – landing area and infrastructure severely damaged, RAD camp hit; 1 KIA and 2 WIA; airfield unserviceable. (German report) 23 Mar 45: airfield ordered evacuated and destroyed. 26 Mar 45: Frankfurt/M. entered by U.S. 3rd Army units and resistance ceased on 29 March. Operational Units: Wetterflugstelle Rhein-Main (c. 1939-44); Kurierstaffel 9 (Sep 39 - ? ); I./JG 77 (Oct-Nov 39); I./JG 76 (Oct 39 – Apr 40); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Oct 39 – May 40); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 31 (Jan-Jun 40)?; III./KG 53 (May-Jul 40); Stab/JG 301 (Oct 43 – Jan 44); Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 1/13 ( ? – Feb 44); part of Wekusta 1 Ob.d.L. (1944); 2./Fl.Zielgeschwader 3 (Feb 44 - ?); Behelfsbeleuchterstaffel 1 (Mar-Jun 44); part of 2./KG 200 (1944); II./NJG 4 (Aug-Nov 44); Kdo. Olga/KG 200 (Nov-Dec 44); IV./JG 4 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); Stab/JG 4 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); III./KG 200 (Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for BFS 3 (Strassburg-Entzheim) (Jun – Oct 41); Einsatzstaffel/KG 101 (Aug – Sep 44); 6./NJG 101 (Dec 44 – Feb 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Rhein-Main (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 18/XII (Mar-Aug 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 41/XI (May 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 6/XII (Jan 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 9/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 25/VII (Jun 44 – Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt.(v) 119/XII (1 Jan 45); Werkstattwagenzug (Fl) 9/XIV (1 Jan 45); Sauerstoffwerk (1 Jan 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 23/VII (summer 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.182-85 (22 Dec 43 updated to 27 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Frauenburg (GER) (a.k.a. Frombork) (54 21 30 N – 19 41 30 E) General: Feldflugplatz in the former East Prussia 30 km NE of Elbing (Elblag). History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Freiburg i.Br. (GER) (48 01 32 N – 07 50 15 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 3 km N of Freiburg/BadenWürttemberg in SW Germany. History: 1928 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). 1932 upgraded and now listed as secondary airport (Flughafen II). - 187 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1937. Wartime use was mainly for flight training and for parachute training. Airfield used occasionally as an Industriehafen by Klemm-Flugzeugbau. Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 915 meters (1500 x 1000 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: well-drained grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: both available. Infrastructure: had 4 large and 1 medium hangar with pave aprons at the SW corner with separate workshop buildings to the rear of some of them. The medium hangar had 2 long sheds adjacent to it, these possibly used to garage motor vehicles. There was a large group of barracks off the SW corner and an additional cluster of barrack huts off the E boundary. Admin buildings were adjacent to the hangars and near the main entrance on the SE boundary. Just S of the airfield was a group of hospital buildings. Nearest rail connect along the SE and SW boundaries. Dispersal: a North and a North-Northwest dispersal had a total of 2 medium open aircraft shelters and 3+ aircraft parking bays. Defenses: airfield protected by 2 light Flak positions in Jan 44. Remarks: transportation targets, e.g. the marshaling yard, in and around the city were bombed a number of times during the war but there were no attacks on the airfield by heavy bombers. 9 Sep 44: low-level attack – 1 x Go 145 and 6 x He 111Bs from Erg.Gruppe für Fallschirmjägerkampfbeobachter shot up and damaged on the ground. 20 Apr 45: Freiburg taken by French troops. Operational Units: I./ZG 52 (Jun 40); II./ZG 2 (Jun-Jul 40); Erprobungskdo. Charlotte (c. Jul 44 – Mar/Apr 45); Stab/JG 76 (AugOct 44); Sonderstaffel Kaatsch (Sep 44); 2./NAGr. 13 (Sep 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 23, FFS A/B 23 then FFS A 23 (Kaufbeuren) (1939-45); Fliegerschule d.Lw. (S) 2 (Jul 41 – Oct 42); Erg.Gruppe für Fallschirmjägerkampfbeobachter (Oct 42 – Sep 44); Fallschirmschule 4 (1943-44). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 2/VII (1943 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 7/VII (Apr-Dec 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 211/XII Donaueschingen (c.Dec 44 – c.Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Maj. Arnold Willerding (Aug 41 - c. summer 42). Station Units (on various dates on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Stab/13.Flak-Div. (Nov-Dec 44); Flugh.Betr.Kp. Freiburg (1940?); Werft-Abt. 7/VII (1944); Werft-Abt.(v) 113/XII (Sep 44 - 1945); Flugh.Betr.Kp./Erg.Gruppe für FallschirmjägerKampfbeobachter (Aug 44); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 19(o) (Oct 39 – 1940); - 188 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Stab/Hei.Flak-Abt. 71/VII (1943-45); Flakscheinw.Abt. 258(o) (1940); Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 217/VII (1943); 3./schw.Flak-Abt. 681 (1945); III. (Funkh.)/Ln.-Rgt. 3 (Sep-Nov 44); Stab III./Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. Westfrankreich (Sep 44 – Jan 45); Ln.-Abt. 133 (Nov-Dec 44); Ln.Flugmelde-Funk-Kp. z.b.V. 23 (Oct-Nov 44); Flugmelde-Funk-Kp. z.b.V. 44 (Nov 44); Institut für Luftfahrtmedizinische Pathologen ( ? – c.1944). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.126-28 (Jan 44 and updated); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Freienwalde (GER) (a.k.a. Bad Freienwalde, Chociwel) (53 27 40 N – 15 20 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Pomerania 52 km E of Stettin (Szczecin), 24 km NE of Stargard and just outside the present day village of Chociwel (formerly Freienwalde). History: wartime use, if any, unknown. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none known. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.957 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Freiwaldau (GER) (a.k.a. Gozdnica) (51 27 40 N – 15 06 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Silesia 109 km NE of Dresden, 32 km NNE of Görlitz and 2.5 km N of the village of Freiwaldau. History: built in 1936 and used before and during the war as a practice field for single-engine and twin-engine trainers. Used by operational units during the Sep 39 attack on Poland, and then again in 1945 when fighters and ground-attack aircraft used it. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 960 x 960 meters (1050 x 1050 yards) and almost square shaped. No paved runway. A perimeter road skirted the N, E and S boundaries. Equipped with perimeter lighting. Infrastructure: there was 1 medium portable hangar and 2 workshop huts at the NW corner. Limited barrack and office accommodations were off the N boundary. The nearest rail connection was in Freiwaldau. Dispersal: a single open aircraft shelter existed in the NW corner. Operational Units: II., III./KG z.b.V. 2 (Aug-Sep 39); III./KG 53 (Feb-Jun 41)?; 3.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 12 (May 41); I./JG 6 (Feb 45); Stab, II./SG 2 (Feb 45); 10.(Pz)/SG 2 (Feb 45); 1.(Pz)/SG 9 (Feb 45). Remarks: none. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for elementary flight school then twinengined conversion school Alt-Lönnewitz (1936 – Jan 40), FFS C 3 then FFS B 3 (Jan 40 – Jul 44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 1 (Görlitz); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 1 (Pyritz) (1938-42). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) 48 Freiwaldau (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 19/IV c. Feb - Apr 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 25/IV (Apr – May 40)?; Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 9/IV (1941). - 189 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Heinrich Apfel (31 Mar 42 - 9 May 42). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Lw.-Bau-Btl. 24/XI (Feb 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.604 (29 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fretsch (GER): not found. Probable misspelling of Pretzsch. Freudenstadt (GER) (48 28 30 N – 08 24 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 69 km SW of Stuttgart and 38 km SSE of Baden-Baden; airfield located 1 km N of the village. History: listed as a grass surfaced Notlandeplatz in 1927. No record of use by the Luftwaffe. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.453 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Friedeberg (GER) (a.k.a. Strzelce Krajenskie) (52 52 30 N – 15 31 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in eastern Brandenburg 26-27 km NE of Landsberg/Warthe (Gorzów Wielkopolski). History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Friedersdorf (GER) (52 17 00 N – 13 48 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) and Arbeitsplatz in Brandenburg 37.5 km SE of Berlin, 37 km NNW of Lubben, 20 km WSW of Fürstenwalde and 1.6 km SSE of the village of Friedersdorf. History: in use by 1941 as a practice field for single-engine trainers. No evidence of use by operational units until Dec 44 when a tactical reconnaissance Staffel arrived. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 775 x 1000 meters (850 x 1100 yards) and irregular in shape. No paved runway Infrastructure: had 3 medium hangar-type buildings and 2 small portable hangars on the S boundary with 1 long workshop at the W end of the hangars. A few small huts provided accommodations at the SE corner. The nearest rail connection was at Friedersdorf. Dispersal: no organized dispersal in Feb 44. Aircraft usually parked off the W boundary. Remarks: none. Operational Units: Nahaufkl.St. 11./11 (Dec 44 – Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 11 and FFS A/B 11 (Schönwalde). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.605-06 (22 Mar 44 updated to 12 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Friedrichshafen (GER) (47 39 42 N – 09 28 48 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfields, in the city or nearby – not complete): Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 96(o) (as Flakgruppe Friedrichshafen) (Jul 43 – Jun 44); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 130(o) (as Flakgruppe Friedrichshafen) (Jul-Dec 44). Flak-Abt.: I./Flak-Rgt. 9 (gem. mot.); schw.241(o); schw.290(o); schw.351(o); schw.444 (Eisb.); schw.455(o); schw.458(o); schw.462(o); schw.472(o); schw.506(o); schw.625(o); le.674(v); schw.681(o); schw.705(o); gem.807(o); le.825 (Eisb.); schw.902 (Eisb.); le.932(v); le.987(o); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 3/VII (1944-45). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: III./Flak-Rgt. 25 (sw. mot.); 360(v); 508(o). Flak-Ers./Flak-Ausb.: Flak-Ers.Abt. 97 (1941-45). Other (sonstige, verschiedene): Flieger-Rgt. 94 (Jul 44 – Jan 45); Ausb.Btl.(OB) d.Lw. 3 (Jan 45). Friedrichshafen-Löwenthal (GER) (47 40 15 N – 09 30 15 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) and factory airfield (Industriehafen) in Baden-Württemberg 2.4 km NE of Friedrichshafen on the Bodensee (Lake Constance). History: dates from 1913 when it was established to train Zeppelin airship crews, the airships being made nearby. 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Nortlandeplatz). 1933 listed as a secondary airport (Flughafen II). Industriehafen for DornierFlugzeugbau since 1933. During the war, Dornier manufactured components and assembled aircraft here. Work to enlarge the airfield began in 1940. Dimensions: approx. 1650 x 640 meters (1,800 x 700 yards). Surface and Runway: had 1 paved runway of 1,000 x 80 meters built in 1942 and completed in May 1943. The rest of the field consisted of good turf on clay soil. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel, oil, water, ammunition and communications available. Infrastructure: there were 3 very large aircraft assembly hangars belonging to Dornier located at the W and S corners of the field and along the SE boundary. Along the NW boundary were 2 more large hangars with paved aprons and with adjacent workshop buildings. Admin and supply buildings were grouped with the two hangars and a separate barracks camp with 10 to 12 buildings was located 1.2 km to the NW. A rail line paralleled the SE boundary. Dispersal: 10 open aircraft shelters located along the SE perimeter.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: heavily defended by Flak – in Jan 44 there were 13 heavy Flak positions within 4 km of the airfield, each with 4 to 6 guns, and 16 light Flak positions, of which 22 or 23 were mounted on Flak towers and 2 or 3 on rooftops. Satellites and Decoys: Tettnang (GER) (47 39 25 N – 09 34 20 E). Dummy 7.3 km E of Friedrichshafen/Bodensee, 5.25 km ESE of FriedrichshafenLöwenthal airfield and 2 km SSW of Tettnang village. Mock-up included a rectangular landing area measuring approx. 730 x 550 meters (800 x 600 yards) on which were parked 6 or 7 light-colored aircraft replicas. There were was no infrastructure. AFHRA A5258 p.445 (1944)] Remarks: 16 Mar 44: Friedrichshafen bombed by 210 B-24 Liberators. 18 Mar 44: Löwenthal airfield bombed by 77 B-24s. 24 Apr 44: Löwenthal airfield bombed by 98 B-17 Fortresses. Jun 44: construction underway to extend the landing area to the NE and SW and an additional large hangar was being built along the NW boundary. 20 Jul 44: aircraft factories at Friedrichshafen bombed by 15th AAF B24s. 3 Aug 44: 15th AAF B-17s and B-24s bombed steel, chemical and fabrics plants at Friedrichshafen. 25 Feb 45: tank factory at Friedrichshafen bombed by 63 8th AAF B17s. Operational Units: II./JG 51 (Jan-Feb 40); I./JG 54 (Feb-Mar 40); Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 2/7 (c.Jun 40 – Aug 42?); Erprobungskdo. Do 335 (Sep-Nov 44). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Munitionsausgabestelle d.Lw. 3/VII (1944-45); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 107/VII (1944). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.129-33 (9 Jan 44 updated to 13 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Friedrichshafen-Manzell (GER) (47 39 50 N – 09 25 50 E) General: seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) in Baden-Württemberg 3.6 km WNW of Friedrichshafen on the Bodensee (Lake Constance) and adjacent to the village of Manzell on its south side. History: dates from 1912 when the firm Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen GmbH was founded and built military aircraft during World War I. The original factory was at Friedrichshafen-Seemoos before it was moved to a new complex at Manzell less than a kilometer to the NW. A factory airfield (Industriehafen) for Dornier-Flugzeugbau since 1933-34 - 192 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 where it manufactured and assembled seaplanes and carried out experimental research. Dimensions: the Bodensee provided unlimited take-off and landing space. Anchorage: 1 slipway (launch ramp) near the main buildings and a second under construction in Oct 43. Fuel and Ammunition: full services were available, including fuel and ammunition. Infrastructure: the extensive buildings of the Dornier factory were situated between the rail lin on the north and the shore of the Bodensee on the south and consisted of 3 hangars, assembly and repair shops, admin buildings, supply buildings and billeting. There was a curved jetty at the NW end. Defenses: in Jan 44 there were 4 heavy Flak positions within 3.6 km of the station, three of these with 6 guns and one with 4 guns. There were 7 light Flak positions within 2 km, including 5 Flak towers and several rooftop emplacements. Remarks: 3 Aug 44: airfield damaged and Flak positions destroyed in heavy attack by 15th AAF B-17s and B-24s. Operational Units: Seetransportstaffel 2 (Sep 43); 2./SAGr. 128 (Aug 44); 1. Seenotstaffel (Aug 44); 3. Seenotstaffel (Aug 44); Seekommando He 115 (Oct 44 – Feb 45). School Units: Flieger-Technischevorschule Friedrichshafen (1939-44). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 215/VII (to Sep 44); Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 230/VII (to Sep 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.134-35 (17 Jan 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Friedrichshafen-Seemoos (See) (GER) (47 39 30 N – 09 26 10 E) General: seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) in Baden-Württemberg 3 km W of Friedrichshafen on the Bodensee (Lake Constance) and .8 km SE of Friedrichshafen-Manzell seaplane station. History: factory airfield (Industriehafen) for Dornier-Flugzeugbau and an satellite field (Ausweichflugplatz) for Friedrichshafen-Manzell. Dornier had its original factory here prior to World War I. Dimensions: Lake Constance (Bodensee) provided ample take-off and landing room. Anchorage: slipway (launch ramp) in front of the hangar. Infrastructure: 1 large hangar with a few small buildings adjacent. Personnel were accommodated at Friedrichshafen-Manzell. A rail line passed just N of the station. Defenses: protected by the Flak defenses at Friedrichshafen-Manzell. Remarks: none. - 193 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Air Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.136 (17 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Friedrichshafen-Zeppelindorf (GER): see FriedrichshafenLöwenthal. Fristringen (GER) (not located) General: tactical airstrip (Gefechtslandeplatz) in Bavaria 33 km NW of Augsburg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: Grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fritzlar (GER) (51 07 00 N – 09 17 00 E) General: controlling air base (Leithorst) 29 km SW of Kassel/Hesse in C Germany; airfield located on the south bank of the Eder River 2 km SSE of Fritzlar. History: built September 1935 - 1937 and used by bomber units before the war. The Junkers aircraft firm took over the hangars in August 1941 for maintenance and production work using forced labor. The Ju 352 was designed at Fritzlar and 44 manufactured before the line was shut down about October 1944 due to a lack of material. Airfield rendered unserviceable for several weeks on 17 May 1943 when RAF Bomber Command breached the Eder Dam and flooded the Eder Valley. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 915 meters (1,300 x 1,000 yards). Runway: grass surface. Equipped with a beam approach system Infrastructure: fuel, water, ammunition, compass swing, machine gun registration range, communications and other amenities were available. Had 6 large hangars and 1 large repair hangar with tarmac aprons along the N boundary. The station buildings and barrack blocks, including control tower, messes, dispensary, sports complex, etc., were all together behind the hangar area. A light rail branch line served the hangar area and the munitions dump. Dispersal: consisted of 8 small and medium open aircraft shelter in May 44. Defenses: at least 1 light Flak position existed on the roof of one of the hangars in Feb 44. Satellites and Decoys: Fritzlar-Werkel (GER) (51 08 50 N – 09 20 15 E). Dummy 5 km NE of Fritzlar airfield and 2 km ESE of the village of Werkel. Mock-up included 2 dummy buildings at the S end and dummy aircraft

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 were at times parked on the E and W boundaries. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.612 (1944)] Remarks: 15 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 1 x Ju 52 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed. 2 Oct 44: bombed by 12 B-17 Fortresses as a target of opportunity. 7 Oct 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 5 x Bf 110s, 3 x Ju 88s and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 7 x Bf 110s, 1 x Me 410, 11 x Ju 88s and 1 x Hs 123 damaged. 22 Feb 45: strafed by 13 P-38 Lightnings – 1 x Ju 88 destroyed. 22 Mar 45: a satellite landing ground called Fritzlar/North One by the Allies was under construction 4 km NE of Fritzlar airfield. A 1,650 meter prepared strip was being leveled adjacent to an existing taxi track that was connected to Fritzlar/North emergency landing ground. 29 Mar 45: airfield ordered immediately evacuated and destroyed. 30 Mar 45: captured by elements of the U.S. 9th Infantry Div. and USAAF P-47 Thunderbolt units moved in 12-13 April. Operational Units: Stab, I./KG 254 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); Stab, I./KG 54 (May-Aug 39); Stab, I./KG 4 (Oct-Nov 39); Stab, III./KG 3 (Oct-Dec 39); Stab/Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (Dec 39 – Apr 40); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (Dec 39 - Jun 40); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 124 (May 40); I./LG 1 (Oct-Nov 41); III./LG 1 (Dec 41 – Mar 42); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Apr 42); III./NJG 1 (Sep 44 – Jan 45); 6./NJG 101 (Feb-Mar 45); Stab/NAGr. 1 (Mar 45); Nahaufkl.St. 13./14 (Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Fritzlar (1940); Sonderabteilung Fl.H.Kdtr. Fritzlar formed Fall 1940 with FpN L 41150 (disbanded fall 1941); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 217/XI (c.Oct 44 – Mar 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Otto Höhne ( ? - 21 Jun 40); Obstlt. Heinrich Lorenz (Nov 42 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Fritzlar (Jul 39 0 Mar 41); Koflug 4/XII (Apr 41 – Jan 42); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 54 (May-Oct 39); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 54 (May-Oct 39); Werft-Kdo. (o) 15/VI (1944-45)?; one Zug from 2./le.Flak-Abt. 936 (May 44 – Mar 45); 2./le.Flak-Abt. 986 (Feb 45); Stab/Lw.-Bau-Rgt. Fritzlar (193940); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Fritzlar. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.186-89 (22 Feb 44 updated to 28 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fritzlar/Nord (GER) (51 08 40 N – 09 15 30 E) (51 08 30 N – 09 17 50 E )? General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Hesse 23 km SSW pf Kassel and 3 km NE of Fritzlar. History: in existence since at least 1927 as part of a military exercise/training ground. Surface and - 195 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dimensions: had a prepared airstrip measuring 1650 meters (1800 yards) aligned E by NW that was still under construction on 22 Mar 45 and not yet operational. Infrastructure: had a small cluster of barrack huts off the NW corner, a rifle range and probable aircraft dispersal in an adjacent woods. Operational Units: Stab, 1./NAGr 1 (Mar 45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 1/VI KasselRothwesten (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.192 (1 Apr 45) and p.590 (23 Dec 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fritzow (GER) (a.k.a. Wrzosowo?) (c. 54 06 N – 15 49 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania 25 km WSW of Köslin (Koszalin). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Füchtorf (GER) (52 03 07 N – 08 01 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine Westphalia 25 km S of Osnabrück and 11.5 km NNE of Warendorf. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fuhlsbüttel (GER): see Hamburg-Fuhlsbüttel. Fulda (GER) (a.k.a. Fulda-Sickels) (50 32 30 N – 09 38 20 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Hesse 86 km NE of Frankfurt/Main; airfield 4 km SW of Fulda on an old military exercise ground. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground Notlandeplatz. Later upgraded to a field airstrip (Feldflugplatz). Surface and Dimensions: hardened grass surface. Luftpark located there? Remarks: 10 Nov 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 4 x Bü 133s destroyed. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.631 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fürstenau (GER): see Vechtel. Fürstenberg (GER) (52 08 40 N – 14 39 15 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 23 km S of Frankfurt/Oder, 22 km NNW of Guben and immediately W of the village of Fürstenberg. - 196 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 History: in existence by 1937. Still listed as operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1145 x 500 meters (1250 x 550 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: there were no hangars, but a small group of buildings on the W boundary may have comprised a few workshops and barrack accommodations. The Fürstenberg – Frankfurt/O. rail line formed the E boundary of the landing ground. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.607 (14 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fürstenfeldbruck (GER) (48 12 30 N – 11 16 45 E) General: Fliegerhorst in Bavaria 23.5 km WNW of Munich in Bavaria and 3.6 km NNE of Fürstenfeldbruck. History: construction began in 1935 and it was ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936 and on 10 October 1936 it was officially hand over to the Luftwaffe. From its inception, it was the intended home of Luftwaffe Air Cadet College (Luftkriegsschule) Fürstenfeldbruck and remained so until Jan 45. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 1100 meters (1150 x 1200 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. An E/W hardened runway (concrete?) was in the early stages of construction in Jun-Jul 44 and measured approx. 1000 meters (1100 yards) with a planned length of approx. 1550 meters (1700 yards). Unverified information suggests the runway was completed in Oct 44. A perimeter track encircled the landing area. Equipped with a flare path, boundary and obstruction lighting, and a beam approach system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the N boundary as well as on the S boundary in front of the hangars. A small ammunition dump was at the NW corner. Infrastructure: had 6 hangars of various sizes with paved hangar aprons on the S boundary and off the SW corner, including a very large repair hangar. Numerous stores buildings, barracks, officers’ quarters and admin buildings were in a woods to the rear of the hangars, and the station motor pool and garages were behind the repair hangar. The airfield control tower was in front of the repair hangar at the SW corner. A branch rail line served the buildings and hangars along the S boundary and continued around the E and N sides of the airfield. Dispersal: there were 2 dispersal areas in Jul 44: Northeast and Northwest with a total of 6 large open aircraft shelters and 1 parking - 197 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 site. A Southwest (remote) dispersal approx. 1370 meters (1500 yards) off the SW corner was under construction and the taxiway from there to the landing area had already been completed. Defenses: unknown but well-protected by 1944-45. Remarks: 11 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s with a number of aircraft claimed on the ground. 9 Apr 45: bombed for the first and only time by 139 B-17 Fortresses and strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – the fighters claimed 3 x Bf 109s, 1 x Do 217 and 1 x He 177 destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109 damaged. Fifty (50) direct hits on the airfield did extensive damage to the runway, taxiways and workshop area knocked it out for the remainder of the war. 29 Apr 45: airfield captured by advancing U.S. forces. Operational Units: JG 71 (Aug-Oct 39); II./JG 51 (Oct 39); III./KG 27 (Oct 39 – Feb 40); I./KG 55 (Mar-Apr 40); Erprobungskdo. Kolb (Nov 44 – Apr 45); II./KG(J) 54 (Mar-Apr 45); III./JG 53 (Apr 45); Sonderkommando “Bienenstock” (16-28 Apr 45). School Units: LKS Fürstenfeldbruck (Oct 37 – Nov 39) then LKS 4 (Aug 40 – Jan 45); Lehrgang für Fliegerhorst- und FlughafenbereichsKommandanten (1945). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 3./Erg.Jagdgruppe Merseburg (Sep-Nov 39). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Fürstenfeldbruck (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 10/VII (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/VII (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 12/VII (1944); Werft-Abt. (v) 115/XII (c.Sep 44 – 1945); Feldwerft-Abt. (mot) z.b.V. 1 (Nov 44 – Apr 45); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 118/VII (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.137-40 (7 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fürstenwalde (GER) (a.k.a. Fürstenwalde/Spree) (52 23 20 N – 14 05 45 E) General: controlling airfield and operational airfield (Leithorst and Einsatzhafen) 50 km SE of Berlin, 30 km W of Frankfurt/O. in Brandenburg; airfield 4 km NE of Fürstenwalde. History: Fürstenwalde/Spree was established in 1936-37 as a Leithorst (main or controlling airfield) but its status declined during the next few years because by 1940/41 it had not been built out beyond a few hangars with a concrete apron. On 1 November 1939 Flugzeugführerschule C Fürstenwalde was established there (name changed to FFS C 10 on 16 January 1940, to FFS B 10 on 15 October 1943, and to Luftkriegsschule 10 on 1 August 1944). This large multi-engine pilot training school was the only permanent unit there. - 198 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 On 24 January 1945 LKS 10 departed for Straubing as forward elements of the Red Army reached the Oder. From then on the airfield went to a war-footing and it was used by many fighter and ground-attack units as a forward airfield. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 915 meters (1100 x 1000 yards) and roughly pear shaped. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Had two intersecting concrete runways measuring 1280 meters (1400 yards) aligned E/W and 520 meters (570 yards) aligned NE/SW. A servicing hardstand fronted the hangars on the S boundary. Equipped with perimeter and obstruction lighting, flare paths and the short form of the visual Lorenz system for night operations. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstand. A small ammunition dump was off the NW corner of the landing area. Infrastructure: by 1944 there were 3 large flight hangars and 1 large repair hangar on the S boundary, and 2 large flight hangars off the N boundary. All of the hangars had paved aprons. Workshop buildings were at the SW corner near the repair hangar. The main station buildings with admin offices, barracks, stores, etc., were off the S boundary to the rear of the hangars. There was also a small group of barrack-type huts in a woods off the SE corner. The station flight control building was in the center of the S boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities in early 1944. Defenses: unknown, but heavy Flak defenses were set up around the airfield in 1945. Remarks: 7 Feb 45: airfield’s light Flak defenses ordered reinforced by OKL due to increased occupancy by operational units. Operational Units: IV./KG 152 (May-Sep 37); KGr. z.b.V. 1 (Oct 37 – Sep 38); III./JG 132 (Aug-Oct 38); II./JG 141 (Nov 38); II./ZG 1 (May-Aug 39); Stab, I./JG 2 (Aug 39); Stab, 2./NAGr. 8 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); 2./NAGr. 3 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); Stab, II., III., 10.(Pz)/SG 2 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); II./TG 3 (Jan 45); Stab, I./SG 1 (Feb-Apr 45). School Units: FFS C Fürstenwalde (Nov 39 – Jan 40) then FFS C 10 (Jan 40 – Jul 44); LKS 10 (Jul – Dec 44); Ausbildungskdo./Fluglehrerschule d.Lw. Reserve Training & Replacement Units: II./SG 151 (Feb-Mar 45); Station Commands: as Fl.H. Fürstenwalde (to c. Sep 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 34/III (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 22/III (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/4. Fliegerdivision (Feb 45); Koflug 10/III (Jul 39 – c.May 41); le.II/Feldwerftverband 10 (Feb-Apr 45); Werft-Kp. 26 (n.d.); II./FlakRgt. 14 (c.Feb-Apr 45); schw.Flak-Abt. 321 (1945); elements of - 199 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 le.Flak-Abt. 755 (Mar-Apr 45); Stab/le.Flak-Abt. 990(v) (Feb 45); le.Flak-Bttr.z.b.V. 14090 (1945); 24.(Flum.Leit)/Ln.-Rgt. 214 (AltMadlitz, May 43 – Aug 44); 4.(m.Flum.Leit)/Ln.-Rgt. 221 (Sep 44 – Apr 45); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Fürstenwalde; Kfz.Instandsetzungszug d.Lw. 16/XI (Feb-Apr 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 57/XI (Mar 45)? [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.608- (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Fürth (GER) (a.k.a. Fürth-Atzenhof) (49 30 10 N – 10 57 30 E) General: principal or controlling airfield (Leithorst and Fliegerhorst) 5 km WNW of Nürnberg in Bavaria; airfield located near the village of Atzenhof 4 km NW of Fürth. History: dates back to 1915/16 when it was used to train World War I pilots. During the 1920s and until August 1933, Fürth-Atzenhof was a civil airport and a Junkers aircraft maintenance center. It was first in use by the Luftwaffe in 1933 and became a full Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935 following significant additional construction. The Junkers aircraft firm had a branch there and it was also used as a test site for prototypes. Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 825 meters (1500 x 900 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: well-drained grass surface on light soil. No paved runway but had a long paved servicing and refueling platform on the S boundary as well as a paved taxiway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the S boundary, at the SW corner and the NW corner. A large underground fuel dump was outside the S boundary. The ammunition dump was off the N boundary by the machine gun range. Infrastructure: there were 7 hangars of various sizes along the E and S boundaries, including 3 large ones, and all had paved hangar aprons. Some or all of the hangars were said to be air conditioned. Station vehicle garages were at the SE corner. Barracks were behind the most northerly hangar, officers’ quarters and mess near the NW corner, flight control between two of the hangars and base stores buildings at the SE corner. Most of the buildings were carefully camouflaged. A special branch rail line served the airfield. Dispersal: had a Northwest dispersal and a Southwest dispersal with a total of 17 small aircraft shelters in Dec 43. By May 44 the small shelters had been removed and replaced with 3 large open aircraft shelters. Defenses: no details found. Remarks: 11 Aug 43: bombed – 1 x Fw 56 and 1 x Kl 32 from III./JG 104 destroyed on the ground. - 200 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 20 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 88s destroyed and 3 more damaged. 2 Apr 45: base personnel began mobilizing as “Luftwaffen-Rgt. 104” with orders to help defend Nürnberg. 5 Apr 45: 67 B-17s bombed an electrical industry target and a munitions dump at Fürth. 16-17 Apr 45: Fürth taken by U.S. 42nd Infantry Div. (Nürnberg fell on 20 April). Fürth-Atzenhof airfield survived the war relatively intact and undamaged. Operational Units: II./KG 2 (Nov 39 – Feb 40); 15.(kroat.)/JG 52 (Jul-Sep 41); I./KG(J) 30 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); II./KG 51 (Apr 45). School Units: FFS B/FFS C Fürth-Atzenhof (1933 – Sep 39); JFS 4 (1939 – Mar 43); Stab and I./JG 104 (Mar 43 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Fürth (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 7/XIII (Nov 42 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 32/VII (Jun 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Hptm. Rudolf Trautvetter (1 Apr 35 - 30 Jun 35); Hptm. Johannes Hackbarth (1 Aug 35 - 12 Mar 36); Maj. Franz Prantner ( ? ? ) 7/43. In addition to those noted, the Kommandeur of the FFS or the JFS located at Fürth concurrently held the position of base Kommandant. Station Units (on various dates on, in or near the Fürth airfields and town – not complete): Koflug Fürth (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 1/XIII (Apr 41 – Feb 43); Koflug 11/XII (Feb 43 – Jun 44); Koflug 14/VII (Jun-Dec 44); 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 2; Werft-Abt.(o) 2/XII (1944-45); schw.Feldwerft-Abt. IV/70 (Mar 45); Flak-Abt. Fürth (1933-35); I./Flak-Rgt. 8 (Apr 35 – Nov 38?); I./Flak-Rgt. 9 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); Flakscheinw.Abt. 686(v) (May 42); schw.Flak-Abt. 697(v) (May 43 – Feb 44); gem.Flak-Abt. 901(v) (Aug 39); Res.Flak-Abt. 902 (Aug 39 – 1940); schw.Flak-Abt. 903(o) (Aug 39); Res.Flak-Abt. 905 (Apr, Nov 40); Flakscheinw.Abt. 908(o) (Aug 39); 2./le.Flak-Abt. 951 (Sep 44 – 1945); Flak-Ers.Abt. 5 (1940-42); Flak-Scheinwerfer-Ausb.Abt. 5 (1942-43); Flak-Ers.Abt. 9 ((1942-45); Flak-Geräteausgabestelle Fürth (1940); Flak-Trsp.Abt. 13 (1939-40); III. (Ausb.Abt.f.Ln.Helferinnen)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 12 (Unterfürberg – 1943-45); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 7/XIII (Apr 40); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 13/XIII (Apr 40); Munitionsausgabestelle d.Lw. 2/XIII (Fürth-Bernbach – 1944); EHafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Fürth; Traktorenzug d.Lw. 11/XII (1944); Lw.-San.Abt. 14/VII (Jun-Dec 44); Flieger-Ers.Btl. XII (c.Oct/Nov 44 – 1945).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.141-43 (23 Dec 43 updated to 9 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Fürth-Industrie (GER) (a.k.a. Fürth-Hardhöhe) (49 28 55 N – 10 57 30 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) located 2 km WNW of Fürth town center in Bavaria. History: the airfield dates from 1919-20 when Gothaer Waggon- und Flugzeugfabrik established an aircraft manufacturing plant there. Gothaer was later renamed Bachmann, Blumenthal & Co. but continued producing aircraft and components. During the war years, those components were for the Ju 87, Bf 110 and the Me 262, while overhaul and repair work was carried out on Bf 110s. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 730 meters (1050 x 800 yards) with an oval shape. Surface and Runway: extensive work was underway in late 1943 to improve the landing area around the runway. Had one approx. 1190 meter (1300 yards) concrete runway aligned ESE/WNW that was completed in Sep 43. Infrastructure: factory assembly shop, offices, major components shop, transformer house, flight hangar with a paved hangar apron, boiler house, metal treatment shops, machine shop, forge, stores and light machine shops formed a compact group at the E boundary. An additional group of stores huts was off the N boundary. A special branch rail line served the factory buildings. Dispersal: no organized dispersals. Defenses: protected by 4 heavy Flak positions (three of them with 6 guns each) and 10 light Flak positions. Satellites and Decoys: Fürth-Veitsbronn (GER) (49 31 00 N – 10 54 15 E). Dummy 5.7 km NW of Fürth factory airfield, 4.5 km WNW of Fürth airfield and 1.2 km NE of the village of Veitsbronn. Mock-up included a group of stage-prop buildings simulating a factory airfield with dummy aircraft parked nearby. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.438 (19 Feb 44)] Remarks: 25 Feb 44: Fürth aircraft components plant bombed by 172 B-24 Liberators. Post raid photos showed extensive damage and destruction to the factory buildings along the E boundary of the airfield. 10 Sep 44: 60 B-17s bombed the Fürth aircraft components factory. By April 1945, the airfield had been heavily damaged and largely bombed out. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XII Fürth (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 32/VII Fürth (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): see under FürthAtzenhof airfield. - 202 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.144-48 (24 Dec 43 updated to 25 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Füssen (GER) (47 34 30 N – 10 40 16 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Bavaria 92 km SSW of München (Munich), 30 km WNW of Garmisch-Partenkirchen and 2 km WNW of Füssen village. History: listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in 1927, but by 1939 had been upgraded to a field airstrip (Feldflugplatz). Glider training activity here during the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 550 x 460 meters (600 x 500 yards). Infrastructure: none. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.431 (25 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

G Gabbert (GER) (53 18 40 N – 15 42 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Pomerania 73 km E of Stettin, 44 km E of Stargard (Stargard Szczecinski) and 1.6 km SE of Gabbert that is the present-day village of Jaworze. History: operational and in use by late August 1939. Listed as still operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 870 x 345 meters (950 x 375 yards) and pear-shaped. No paved runway. Infrastructure: there was 1 large repair hangar off the NW corner and several barracks in the woods behind the hangar. The nearest rail connection was 3.25 km WSW in Hassendorf. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities in March 1944. Remarks: none. Operational Units: Stab, II./KG 26 (Aug-Sep 39); I./ZG 26 (Apr-May 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 12 then FFS A/B 12 (Königsberg/Neumark); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 120 (Prenzlau) (194042); FFS B 38 (Jul – Dec 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Kommodore der Ergänzungsjagdgruppen (May – Jun 44); 1. and 2./(Erg.) JGr. West (Jun – Jul 44); 2./(Erg.) JGr. Süd (May-Jun 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Gabbert (to Aug 39); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 43/III (Sep 39 – May 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 6/III (1940); as Fl.H. Gabbert (to 1943); Platzkdo. of A(o) 6/III Stettin-Altdamm (1944). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.609 (14 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gäbersdorf (GER) (51 02 20 N – 16 27 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Silesia 42 km W of Breslau (Wroclaw), 22 km N of Schweidnitz (Swidnica) and adjacent to the present-day village of Udanin. History: built during the late 1930’s. May have been returned to cultivation during the war and then reactivated in fall 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface of unknown dimensions. Infrastructure: no information found. Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stab and elements of Erg.JG 1 (Nov 44 – Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.968 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gablingen (GER) (48 27 00 N – 10 51 50 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Bavaria 8-10 km N of Augsburg; airfield 3 km ENE of Gablingen and adjacent to the village of Stettenhofen. History: built 1934-35 and a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Used as an aviation depot (Luftpark) from 1936 to the end of the war, handling parts, components right up to complete aircraft. Also home to flight schools from Oct 40 to the end. Further, bomber units were rested, refitted and re-equipped here during 1943. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 915 meters (1200 x 1000 yards). Surface and Runways: Grass surface. Fuel and Ammunition: both available. Infrastructure: had 5 or 6 hangars, a large repair hangar and adjacent workshop buildings ranged along the N side of the airfield. Station buildings, including barracks and numerous storage buildings, were also on the N side of the field. A branch rail line served the N and E boundaries. Dispersal: aircraft were widely dispersed in fields off the SW corner. Defenses: on 1 Nov 43, there were 3 heavy Flak batteries with a total of 16 guns with 1.2 and 5.25 km of the airfield, and 7 light Flak positions around the perimeter of the field or in Flak towers or on the roof of buildings. Remarks: Nov 42: troop occupancy consisted of the station’s Stabskompanie and Horstkompanie, and FFS C 15’s Schulerkompanie and Technische Kompanie. 24 Apr 44: bombed by 120 B-24 Liberators. According to German reports, 2 hangars and the control tower were completely burned out, another hangar lightly damaged, 50% of the other infrastructure in the hangar area destroyed, the majority of the 44 aircraft on the airfield - 204 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 were damaged, 18 barrack huts in the branch camp of Dachau concentration camp as well as other accommodations were destroyed, 13 killed and 61 injured. The house of the Kommandant, Oberst Alfred Traeger, was destroyed, his 4 young children killed and his wife badly injured. 24 Jul 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – 1 x C 445 A-1 and 1 x Junkers W 34 Hi from FFS B 5 destroyed on the ground (incomplete German sources). VIII Fighter Command claimed 3 x Do 217s, 4 x Ju 88s and 1 x Fw 190 destroyed, plus 4 x Do 217s and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 10 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 3 x He 111s, 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x Bf 109 destroyed, plus 1 x He 111 damaged. 21 Mar 45: bombed – heavy damage to airfield infrastructure. (German report) 16 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 65 destroyed or damaged, mostly Bf 109s, Fw 190s, Me 410s and several He 177s, Ju 88s and Ju 52s. Operational Units: Stab, I./KG 355 (Apr 37 – Jun 38); I./JG 144 (Nov-Dec 38); I./ZG 144 (Jan-Apr 39); II./ZG 76 (May-Jun and Sep 39); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Oct 39 – May 40); I./KG 27 (Nov 39 – Feb 40); III./KG 55 (Mar-May 40); I./KG 53 (Mar-Apr 43); II./KG 53 (AprJul 43); III./KG 53 (Jul-Dec 43); NSGr. 1 (Süd) (Apr 45); Nahaufkl.St. 13./14 (Apr 45). School Units: FFS C 15 (Oct 40 – Jan 43); FFS B 7 (Apr – Jul 44); FFS A 5 (Jul 44 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: II./EKG(J) (Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Gablingen (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 36/VII (Nov 43 – Feb 44); Fl.Pl.Kdo. B 39/VII (Jan-Feb 44); Flugplatzkdo. Gablingen of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/VII Lechfeld (1944-45); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 233/VII (Jan 45); Fl.H.Kdtr. A 102/XVII (Dec 44 - Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftpark Gablingen (later Luftpark 1/VII) (c. 1935-45); Werft-Abt.(v) 107/XII (1944-45); Instandsetzungswerkstatt für Flieger-Bodengerät 1/VII (1944); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 13/VII (1943-44); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 38/VII (Nov 44); elements of Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 38 (1942 – Apr 45); Kfz.Beständebezirk d.Lw. 2/VII (1943-45); Kfz.Beständelager d.Lw. 2/VII A (1943-45); Kfz.Beständelager d.Lw. 2/VII C (1943-45); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 123/VII (1944-45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 85/VII (summer 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.149-51 (4 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site www.amerika-inaugsburg.de/index.php?id=1418] - 205 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Gager (GER) (54 18 55 N – 13 41 10 E) General: seaplane anchorage on the island of Rügen in the Baltic off Stralsund; Gager, a small port with a sheltered harbor, located on the hook-shaped eastern tip of the island. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Anchorage: had ample take-off and landing space just off the entrance to the harbor. Mooring facilities were available in the small harbor. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.962 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gahlendorf (GER) (c. 54 27 13 N – 11 14 50 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Schleswig-Holstein on the island of Fehmarn and located 4 km ENE of the village of Burg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gahro (GER) (a.k.a. Dabern) (51 43 45 N – 13 41 20 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Brandenburg 43 km W of Cottbus, 10 km N of Finsterwalde and on the SW edge of the village of Gahro, just 2 km NNE of the village of Dabern. History: built 1937-38 and used as a practice field for trainers to summer 1944 and then by single-engine fighters and ground attack aircraft to Apr 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 960 x 1100 meters (1050 x 1200 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points at the NW corner. The ammunition dump was off the NE corner. Infrastructure: there were no hangars, but 2 workshop buildings were located off the N boundary. A few barrack huts were off the SE boundary. The nearest rail connection was the Finsterwalde-Luckau line 2.5 km E of the landing area. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Remarks: none. Operational Units: I./JG 76 (Aug-Sep 44); I./JG 300 (Sep-Oct 44); II./JG 11 (Oct 44); I./JG 4 (Oct-Nov 44); IV./JG 301 (Feb 45); II./SG 77 (Feb-Mar 45); 10.(Pz)/SG 77 (Feb-Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for elementary flight school then twinengined conversion school Alt-Lönnewitz (1936 – Jan 40), FFS C 3 then FFS B 3 (Jan 40 – Jul 44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 7 (Finisterwalde (1940-43). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Gahro (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 4/IV (Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 27/IV (Nov 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 6/IV (1941); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 101/I Finsterwalde (c. Nov 44 – Feb 45); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 270/III (Mar 45)? Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 6./le.Flak-Abt. 733 (Mar-Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.555 (13 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Galtgarben (GER) (e. Kruglovo) (c. 54 49 03 N – 20 02 48 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 32 km WNW of Königsberg in East Prussia and located in the west-central part of the Samland Peninsula. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 10/I (1940)? [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ganacker (GER): see Landau/Isar. Gandau (GER): see Breslau-Gandau. Ganschendorf (GER) (53 49 04 N – 13 05 52 E) History: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Mechlenburg – Western Pomerania 31 km NNW of Neubrandenburg and 10 km SSE of Demmin. May have consisted of a Ganschendorf/Ost and a Ganschendorf/West. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ganshorn (GER) (??) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in East Prussia near Osterode. Not located. History: used by tactical reconnaissance aircraft during the Polish Campaign but no evidence found of any use after that. Operational Units: 2.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 10 (Aug-Sep 39). [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gardelegen (GER) (52 32 20 N – 11 26 20 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 47 km NNW of Magdeburg in Altmark; airfield located 3 km ENE of Gardelegen on the north side of the Gardelegen-Stendal road. History: construction began in 1938 and was completed in 1940 and was used mainly as a station for Fallschirmjäger (parachute troops) air transport groups and flight training schools to the end of 1942. From the beginning of 1943, it was increasingly used by reserve training/replacement units and by operational fighter groups to the end of the war. Dimensions: c.1,600 x 1,600 meters. - 207 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Surface and Runways: grass surface. Equipped for night landings with lighting, flarepath, a beam approach system and the short version of the visual Lorenz system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were along the SE boundary and bulk fuel storage off the SE boundary. The bomb dump was in a woods about 1 km NE of the landing area. Infrastructure: communications, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. Had 7 hangars along the S boundary, all but one large or very large, numerous workshops and storage buildings to the rear of the hangars, two separate motor pool and garage yards, and clusters of admin buildings and barrack blocks off the S and SE boundaries. Gardelegen airfield was home to a Luftpark and accordingly had a large complex of storage buildings served by a branch rail line off the main GardelegenStendal line. The main storage complex was at the SW corner of the field and a smaller one was hidden in woods 1.6 km E of the field. Dispersal: there were 3 dispersal areas – North, Northeast and East – with a total of 13 open aircraft shelters and 19 aircraft blast bays (11 Apr 44). Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 29 Jun 44: airfield bombed by 9 B-24 Liberators as a secondary target. 15 Mar 45: town and a cavalry remount center bombed by 31 B-24s as a target of opportunity. Operational Units: KGr. z.b.V. 1 (1937 - Aug 39); I./KG z.b.V. 1 (Aug 39 – Mar 40); elements of JG 25 (Jul-Dec 43); I./JG 301 (Nov-Dec 43); 6./TG 5 (Jan-Feb 44); II./JG 3 (Mar-Jun 44); II./JG 5 (Jun 44); IV./JG 301 (Nov 44 – Mar 45); II./KG(J) 54 (Jan 45); IV./JG 54 (JanFeb 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 11 and FFS A/B 11 (Schönwalde); Arbeitsplatz for BFS 6 then FFS B 36 (Wesendorf) (Mar 41 – Jul 44); Stab/KG 101 (Feb 43 – Oct 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 12./KG 30 (Feb 43 – Feb/Mar 44); IV./KG 54 (Dec 43 – Dec 44); II./KG(J) 54 (Jan 45); IV./LG 1 (Jan 45); Stab and I./EKG 1 (Jan – Feb 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Gardelegen ( - to Mar 44?); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 25/XI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Bruno Wustrau ( ? ? ) 4/41; Oberst Gerhard Berlin ( ? - May 43); Oberst Emil Clemens (May 43 ? ); Oberst Walter Milz ( ? - 13 Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/XI. Fliegerkorps (Nov 43 – c.Feb 44); Werft-Abt. d.Lw. 11/XI (Dec 44 - ? ); Werft-Abt. (o) 25/XI (spring 44 – 1945); 135. Flughafen- 208 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Dec 44 - ? ); Luftpark Gardelegen (Later Luftpark 2/XI) (c. 1938-45); Ln.-Heimatreparaturbetrieb 3/XI (c.1942-45); I./Fallschirmjäger-Rgt. 2 (Aug 39 - ? ); Genesenden-Btl./FallschirmAOK 1 (1945); elements of 11. Fallschirmjäger-Div. (Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.610-12 (4 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Garder-See (GER) (53 41 07 N – 12 03 57 E) General: seaplane anchorage (Seeflugstützpunkt) on a lake in Mecklinburg – Western Pomerania 44 km E of Schwerin and 14.5 km SSW of Güstrow. History: listed as still operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Anchorage: no information. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Garz (Land) (GER) (a.k.a. Garz/Usedom) (53 52 40 N – 14 09 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) on Usedom Island 57 km NNW of Stettin, 6 km SW of Swinemünde (Swinoujscie) and immediately SW of the village of Garz. History: a civil landing ground in 1928, Garz was taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1935 and developed into a military airfield. Inaugurated as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Garz was home to single-engine and twin-engine fighter units at the beginning of the war, then to experimental units using air-launched guided bombs from 1942-44, and finally as a busy fighter interceptor station in 1945. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 730 meters (1050 x 800 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: flat grass surface. Had 4 paved runways in the form of a modified letter “A” measuring approx: (1) 900 meters (980 yards) aligned NW/SE; (2) 660 meters (720 yards) aligned NE/SW; (3) 840 meters (920 yards) aligned WNW/ESE; and, (4) 550 meters (600 yards) aligned NNE/SSW. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the S boundary and in front of the hangar at the SW corner. A small ammunition dump was off the NW corner. Infrastructure: had 1 repair hangar and 3 medium flight hangars, all along the S and SW side of the airfield. Workshops, motor pool with garages, base construction office and the fire station were grouped in the same area. The main station buildings were in the woods off the SW corner and included admin offices, barracks, messhalls, etc., while the officers’ quarters and mess, operations and communications center and female auxiliary quarters were off the S boundary. A branch off the Usedom-Swinemünde rail line served the hangar area. - 209 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities in March 1944. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none - no evidence found of attacks by Allied heavy bombers. Operational Units: I.(J)/Lehrgeschwader Greifswald (Feb-Oct 38); Stab, I.(J)/LG 2 (Nov 38 – Sep 39); I./ZG 52 (Jan-Mar 40); II./ZG 76 (Feb-Mar 40); II./ZG 1 (Mar-Apr 40); II./SKG 210 (May-Jun 41); Versuchsstaffel d.Lw. 293 (Nov 41 – Feb 42); Lehr- und Erprobungskdo. 15 (Mar 42 – Apr 43); Lehr- und Erprobungskdo. 21 (Aug 42 – Jan 43); Stab, II./KG 100 (Apr-Jul 43); Lehr- und Erprobungskdo. 36 (Aug 43 – Dec 44); III./KG 100 (Aug-Sep 44); Versuchskdo./KG 200 (Dec 44 – Apr 45); Stab, II./JG 1 (Feb-Apr 45); II./JG 3 (Feb-Apr 45); IV./JG 51 (Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 120 (Prenzlau) (1940-42); Jagdlehrerüberprüfungsgruppe (May 44); II./JG 110 (Jun 44 – Feb 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Garz (1939 – Jan 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 19/III (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 1/III (Apr 44 – 1945). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Erich Hill ( ? ? ) 4/41; Obstlt. Joachim von Ziegesar (Oct 42 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 15/III (1944-45); Flugh.Betr.Kp. (FK) 1 (Feb 45); Flugh.Betr.Kp. (FK) 5 (Nov 43 – Feb 44, Sep-Nov 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.613-15 (15 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Garz (See) (GER) (c. 53 52 40 N – 14 09 30 E) General: seaplane station on Usedom Is. on the Baltic coast 96 km NNW of Stettin. History: No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Anchorage: no information. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: chronologies; AFHRA, BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gatow (GER): see Berlin-Gatow. Gaukönigshofen (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Giebelstadt airfield - see there. Gaulsheim (GER) (49 58 04 N – 07 57 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 21.5 km W of Mainz and 3.5 km E of Bingen. History: listed as operational in Dec 39. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Geilenkirchen-Gillrath (GER): see Gillrath. Geilenkirchen-Puffendorf (GER): see Puffendorf. Geilenkirchen-Tripsrath (GER): see Tripsrath. Geinsheim (GER) (a.k.a. Hessenaue) (49 54 10 N – 08 22 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 22 km W of Darmstadt, 10 km SE of Mainz and 3.25 km NNW of Geinsheim village. History: established in the late 1930’s. Little or no activity after the conclusion of the campaign in the West in Jun 40. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 915 x 915 meters (1000 x 1000 yards) and square in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: no hangars, but there were small groups of buildings at the SE corner, along the S boundary and at the NW corner. Nearest rail connection at Gross Gerau, 8 km to the NE of the field. Dispersal: no organized dispersal. Remarks: Jan 45: listed as still operational. Operational Units: I./KG 2 (Mar-Apr 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Geinsheim (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 24/XII (Mar 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 20/VII Wiesbaden-Erbenheim (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 1. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.152 (15 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Geithain (GER) (51 02 30 N – 12 40 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Thuringia 40 km SSE of Leipzig and 19-20 km ENE of Altenburg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gelchsheim (GER) (49 34 30 N – 10 02 45 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Bavaria 26 km SSE of Würzburg and 2 km ENE of the village of Gelchsheim. History: built in 1936 and received only limited use after the end of the 1940 air campaign in the West. Reportedly used by some transport aircraft during mid-1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 730 x 1100 meters (800 x 1200 yards) and rectangular in shape. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: there were 2 sets of refueling points inside the N boundary and 1 set in the SW corner. The ammunition dump was of the NW boundary. Infrastructure: had - 211 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 1 medium hangar with a paved hangar apron and 4 small hangars off the N boundary. Additional workshops and stores were S of the medium hangar. All of the hangars, workshops and stores buildings were serviced by railway sidings. A small barracks complex was located on the W outskirts of Ollingen village near the airfield and additional personnel were probably billeted in nearby villages. Dispersal: on the N side of the landing area were 13 “Dutch barn” type aircraft shelters, 2 very large, 9 large and 2 medium. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 13 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 9 x Hs 123s and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. Feb 45: airfield listed as still operational. Operational Units: I./KG 53 (May 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Gelchsheim (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 41/XIII (Mar-Apr 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): FeldLuftmunitionslager 4/XIII (Oct 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.153-54 (7 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gelnhausen (GER) (a.k.a. Gelnhausen-Rothenbergen) (50 11 54 N – 09 07 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) located 32.4 km E of Frankfurt/M.; airfield 5 km west of the town. History land taken over by the Luftwaffe on 28 March 1935 and construction began shortly after that and continued until the airfield was completed about May 1937. Occupied pre-war by bomber units using the nearby bombing range at Lettgenbrunn-Villbach. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 730 meters (1,100 x 800 yards). Runway: grass surface with two fan-shaped paved starting platforms, one on the NW side of the landing area and the other on the E boundary. Infrastructure: had 1 large hangar, workshops, motor pool and admin buildings grouped together on the W boundary, and a smaller cluster of buildings on the S boundary. A block of barracks was immediately behind the hangar and more barrack accommodations were just NE of the airfield on the western outskirts of Gelnhausen. Also had fuel tanks, refueling points and munitions bunkers. A branch rail line served the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal areas (Dec 44). Defenses: location of Flak positions not identified. Remarks:

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 5 Sep 44: two low-level attacks by VIII Fighter Command P-38 Lightnings and P-47 Thunderbolts - 26 x Fw 190As (all from I./JG 11), 5 x He 72D, 2 x Fw 58, 1 x Fw 56, 5 x Fw 44, 1x Bü 181, 1 x Ar 65, 1 x Bf 108 and 1 x Fi 156, plus 24 gliders of various types all reportedly destroyed on the ground; all but the Fw 190s belonged to Segelflugausbildungsstelle d.Lw. Gelnhausen which was put out of business and disbanded a short time later (German sources). The Allies reported 38 destroyed and 21 damaged in this attack, almost all Fw 190s. 8 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 190A from I./JG 11 and 3 x Ju 52s destroyed, plus 1 x Ju 52 damaged. 12 Dec 44: bombed by 17 B-24 Liberators as a secondary target. 30 Mar 45: airfield captured by advancing U.S. forces after being partially destroyed by the retreating Germans. Operational Units: 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Oct 39 – May 40); II./ZG 26 (Jan-May 40); Stab/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Mar-May 40); I./JG 11 (Sep 44). School Units: Segelausbildungsstelle für Flugzeugführerschulen A/B (1941-44); Segelflugausbildungsstelle der Luftwaffe Gelnhausen/Ausb.Kdo. 330 (1942-44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. C Gelnhausen (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 7/XII (Jan 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Gelnhausen of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 6/XII Langendiebach (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. Gelnhausen of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 22/VII Langendiebach (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Hptm. Emil Wehinger (May 37 – May 38?); Obstlt. Ulrich Lademann (May 38 – c. Jul 39); Maj. Walter Geimecke (1939); Maj. Arthur Trost (1939 – Jun 40); Hptm. Bethke (Jun 40 - ? ); Maj. Bäumlein ( 1945 ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug 2/XII (May 43 – Jun 44); Koflug 13/VII (Jun 44 – Apr 45); 3. (Fspr.u.Fschr.Betr.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Abt. 14 (Meerholz, c.Nov 44 – 1945); Ln.-Kp. z.b.V. 2 (Feb-Mar 45); Ln.-Kp. z.b.V. 40 (Somborn, Sep 44 – 1945); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 11/VII (Oct, Dec 44); Traktorenzug d.Lw. 10/XII (1944). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.193-95 (7 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Gelsdorf (GER) (50 35 04 N – 07 01 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 18 km SSW of Bonn and 17 km W of Remegen. History: listed as operational in Dec 39. May have been used during the May 1940 attack into Belgium, but no further information or mention of wartime

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gelsenkirchen-Buer (GER) (c. 51 33 20 N – 07 04 05 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in North Rhine – Westphalia 11.5 km NNE of Essen and 4 km NNW of Gelsenkirchen/Ruhr. History: a civil landing ground in 1927 (Verkehrslandeplatz). Upgraded to a class II civil airport (Flughafen II) by 1932. Taken over by the Luftwaffe and built out as an airfield in 1936-37. Little wartime activity after mid-1940. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 915 meters (1,000 x 1,000 yards). Runway: grass surface. Taxi tracks from the hangar area to the landing area. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications, ammunition dump, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. Had 5 medium hangars with paved aprons in a line at the N end of the airfield with small workshop buildings near the two hangars in the center. The station admin offices were in a semi-circular building between the hangars and barrack blocks were located behind the hangars. Nearest rail connection in Gelsenkirchen. Dispersal: none identified (Feb 44). Defenses: in mid-Aug 43 there were 8 heavy Flak positions of 6 guns each within a few hundred meters and 5 km of the airfield, 25 light Flak positions around the perimeter plus 7 barrage balloons. Remarks: 1941-45: Gelsenkirchen bombed many times by both the RAF and USAAF due to oil and other targets located there, but the airfield does not appear to have been intentionally attacked prior to March 1945. 23 Mar 45: bombed and strafed by approx. 8 P-47 Thunderbolts – minor damage to landing area and a few buildings. (German report) 10 Apr 45: Gelsenkirchen taken by U.S. 9th Army. Operational Units: II./ZG 1 (Apr-May 40); 5.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (SepNov 44); 3./NAGr. 1 (Nov 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Buer (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 14/VI (1940); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 4/VI Dortmund-Brackel (Apr 44 – 1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): elements of schw.Flak-Abt. 112(o) (1942-43)?; elements of le.Flak-Abt. 718 (Jan 43); 1./Luftsperr-Abt. 103(o) (1942); Luftschutz-Rgt. z.b.V. 1 (fall 42 – Apr 45); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 23 (Oct 42); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 24 (Lenkerbeck, 1940 - c.1942). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.196-99 (15 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 214 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Gelsenkirchen-Rotthausen (GER) (c. 51 30 30 N – 07 03 40 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 5.7 km S of Gelsenkirchen-Buer airfield. History: had limited use in spring 1940 but by 1941 had been abandoned and turned into a slag dump for a nearby industrial plant. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 915 x 460 meters (1000 x 500 yards). Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.632 (2 Sep 41); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gera (GER) (50 54 52 N – 12 04 28 E) General: airfield in Thuringia 55 km SW of Leipzig. History: 1927 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). 1932 now listed as a secondary airport (Flughafen II). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gerdauen (GER) (a.k.a. Zheleznodorozhnyy) (54 23 50 N – 21 17 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) 65 km SE of Königsberg (Kaliningrad), 42 km SW of Insterburg (Chernyakhovsk), 13 km SE of Allenburg and 4 km N of Gerdauen in the former East Prussia. History: laid out in 1938-39 and in use by August 1939. Operationally active for the attack on Poland and then again for the attack on Russia in Jun 41. Served as a practice field for trainers during the mid-war years and then became an active airfield for fighters and groundattack aircraft as the Russians approached East Prussia in fall 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface with unknown dimensions but a take-off and landing run of some 1370 meters (1500 yards) was said to be possible. Infrastructure: probably no more than a few sheds used as workshops. Nearest rail connection in Gerdauen. Operational Units: I./KG 2 (Aug-Sep 39); Stab, I./KG 76 (Jun-Jul 41); elements of I./NJG 100 (Aug-Nov 44); Stab, I./SG 3 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); 10.(Pz.)/SG 3 (Oct-Nov 44); II./SG 1 (Oct-Dec 44); I., II./SG 4 (Nov 44); II./JG 1 (Jan 45); School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 125 then FFS A 125 (Neukuhren) (1941-44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 13./KG 55 (Mar 44).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Gerdauen (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 1/I (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. Gerdauen (1941); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 44/XI (Mar-Jun 41); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 104/I (c. fall 44 – Jan 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Jagdfliegerführer Ostpreussen (Sep-Oct 44); le.Feldwerft-Staffel 5/10 (mot) (Dec 41); schw.Feldwerft-Abt. IV/50 (Dec 41); elements of le.Feldwerft-Abt. I/60 (Jan 45); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 227/XI (Lett) (Sep 44 - ? ); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 185/XI (Feb 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.620 (29 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Germersheim (GER) (49 13 30 N – 08 20 55 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland – Pfalz 24 km N of Karlsruhe, 12 km SSW of Speyer and 2 km NW of Germersheim. History: probably laid out in late 1939 but not used to any extent until 1944 when it became an alternative landing ground for night fighters. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1100 x 275 meters (1200 x 300 yards). No paved runway. Equipped with a flare path for night landings. Infrastructure: no hangars or other buildings, but there was a military barracks 900 meters SE of the landing area, and a barracks complex some 1800 meters to the NW that was still under construction in Aug 44. Nearest rail connection at Germersheim. Dispersal: a West (remote) dispersal was under construction some 2375 meters from the W boundary in late Aug 44 and already had 18 aircraft bays that had been cut into woods. Remarks: 24 Mar 45: Germersheim taken by U.S. armor. Operational Units: I./JG 4 (Sep 44); III./JG 53 (Nov-Dec 44); IV./KG 200 (Jan 45); NSGr. 20 (Jan-Mar 45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 3/XII LachenSpeyersdorf (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 19/VII Lachen-Speyerdorf (Jun-Sep 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 204/XII (c.Oct 44 – Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.155 (3 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gerolzhofen (GER) (49 54 00 N – 10 21 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Bavaria 20 km SE of Schweinfurt. History: used as a practice field for trainers and a few night fighters were stationed here from Sep 44 to early 1945. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface that afforded a take-off and landing run of approx. 915 meters (1000 yards). Infrastructure: little if any. Remarks:

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 6 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Me 410 and 1 x Ju 88 destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 110 damaged. Operational Units: part of IV./NJG 6 (Sep 44 – Jan 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 1 then FFS B 1 (1943-44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A 7 (1944-45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Gerolzhofen (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 60/XIII (Mar-Apr 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.453 (24 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gerslinden (GER/RUSS) (e. Gerslinden) (a.k.a. Ganovka, Gannovka) (54 55 N – 22 07 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in the former East Prussia 23 km SE of Tilsit and near Liebenfelde and the tiny village (400 pop.) of Gerslinden. History: listed as operational in Sep 41. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gerstungen (GER) (50 57 48 N – 10 04 02 E) General: an unimproved dispersal strip in the Gotha-Erfurt area where bombers were parked when no further operations were possible owing to the fuel shortage, specifically 68 km W of Erfurt, 17.5 km W of Eisenach and 2.75 km NE of the town of Wildeck. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: farm land and grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Remarks: 27-30 Sep 44: strafed by USAAF P-51 Mustangs – 3 x Ju 188s from I./KG 6 destroyed or damaged on the ground. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Geseke (GER) (51 37 05 N – 08 33 15 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 19.5 km SW of Paderborn, 16 km SE of Lippstadt and 3.6 km SE of Geseke. History: inactive after mid-1940 but rehabilitated in 1944 and commenced operation in September 1944. Dimensions: 1,075 x 850 meters. Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: none identified (Nov 44). Dispersal: in a woods SW of the landing area. Defenses: Flak positions not identified. Remarks: 2 Oct 44: bombed by 9 B-17 Fortresses.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 5 Oct 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 3 x Bf 109s, 1 x Fw 190, 3 x Bf 110s, 3 x Me 210s, 3 x Ju 88s destroyed, plus 3 x Bf 109s, 3 x Me 210s and 2 x He 111s damaged. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 72 (Detmold) (1939). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stuka-Erg.St./VIII. Fliegerkorps (Feb – May 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.200 (27 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Giebelstadt (GER) (49 39 10 N – 09 58 30 E) General: Fliegerhorst in Bavaria 15 km S of Würzburg and 1.6 km E of the village of Giebelstadt. History construction began in late summer 1934 and was completed June 1935. The infrastructure, especially the housing area, was designed to reflect a so-called “Luftwaffe Modern” style and on completion the base was considered one of the most attractive in Germany. Officially designated a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Hitler visited the airfield on 17 September 1936. From June 1940 to 1944, Giebelstadt was used by the Ergänzungsgruppe (reserve training group) of several bomber units and briefly by other units that arrived to rest and refit or to convert from one type of aircraft to another. In 1944 Giebelstadt was selected as an active base for jet aircraft and a great deal of hurried construction took place. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 915 meters (1,000 x 1,000 yards). Runway: had one 2,500 meter concrete runway just completed (Sep 44) and a paved taxiway. A 600 meter runway extension was under construction. Starting platforms have been built along the E and W boundaries at the N end of the runway. Obstruction lighting, flare path, beam approach and visual Lorenz for night landings. Infrastructure: multiple refueling points, munitions dump and communications facilities. One very large, 5 large and 1 medium hangar in three clusters on the N and E boundaries and at the SE corner, all with paved aprons. Additional workshop buildings around the hangars. The very large hangar was probably for repairs. Station HQ, flight control and supply buildings located on the N side of the field among the hangars. Barracks, quarters, messes and canteens/clubs were in a wooded area at the NE corner. A singletrack branch rail line was run to the airfield. Dispersal: two remote areas to the N and E of the field were under construction in Sep 44. Defenses: Flak positions were located about 1 km off the N boundary and at the SW corner. - 218 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Remarks: 9 Aug 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 5 x Bf 109s, 5 x Bf 110s and 4 x Me 210s destroyed, plus 10 x Bf 110s, 1 x Me 210 and 1 x Fw 200 damaged. 10 Sep 44: bombed by 112 B-17 Fortresses. 3 Oct 44: bombed by 49 B-17s. 6 Jan 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 9 x Ju 88s, 2 x Do 217s and 3 x unidentified aircraft destroyed. 13 Jan 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Me 262, 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x Do 217 destroyed, plus 1 x Ju 88 damaged. 16 Jan 45: low-level attack – 1 x Me 262 A-1 from II./KG(J) 54 destroyed on the ground. 6 Feb 45: low-level attack by 9th AAF P-47 fighter-bombers – 1 x Fw 190 from I./KG(J) 54 damaged. 11 Feb 45: low-level attack by 9th AAF P-47 fighter-bombers – 1 x Fw 190 claimed destroyed. 20 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – 1 x Me 262 A-1 from I./KG(J) 54 damaged and 1 x He 177 damaged. (German report). The Allied fighters claimed 2 x Bf 109s and 1 x Ju 88 destroyed. 21 Feb 45: low-level attack by approx. 11 P-51s – 1 x Me 262 A-1 and 1 x Bü 181 C-3 from I./KG(J) 54 destroyed or damaged. (German report) 23 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x He 177 destroyed and another damaged. 25 Feb 45: bombed by 96 B-24 Liberators – 4 Me 262 A-1s and 2 x Bü 181 C-3s from I./KG(J) 54 destroyed or damaged; 1 KIA and 2 WIA. 19 Mar 45: low-level attack by approx. 8 P-51s – 3 x Me 262 A-1 from KG(J) 54 destroyed or damaged. (German report) 21 Mar 45: strafed by 36 P-51 Mustangs – German accounts state there was little damage aside from a single Me 262 shot down while attempting to land. 22 Mar 45: bombed by 75 B-24s – 11 x Me 262 A-1s and 2 x Bf 109s from KG(J) 54 destroyed or damaged plus 2 x Ju 88s destroyed; runway and the western third of the landing area heavily cratered; Me 262 operations no longer possible. (German report) 1 Apr 45: airfield taken by elements of the U.S. 12th Armored Div. The landing area was heavily cratered and many buildings had been destroyed. Airfield Units: Operational Units: Fliegergruppe Giebelstadt (Oct 35 – Apr 36); I./KG 155 (Apr 36 – Feb 38); III./KG 355 (Jul 38 – May 39); III./KG 53 (May 39 – Feb 40); I./KG 2 (Feb-May 40); I./KG 76 (Oct 40 – Mar 41); - 219 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 III./KG 1 (Jun 41); Stab, I./KG 77 (Dec 41 – Jan 42); II./KG 76 (AprMay 42); III./KG 100 (Aug-Sep 44); Stab and I./KG(J) 54 (Aug 44 – Mar 45); Stab, I./KG 51 (Mar 45). School Units: Verkehrsfliegerschule Giebelstadt (Jun-Sep 35). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Schulstaffel/KG 53 (Jun – Sep 40); IV./KG 76 (Apr 41 – Sep 42); IV./KG 100 (May 43 – Sep 44)?; Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Giebelstadt (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 26/VII (Jun 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Heinrich Christenn ( ? ? ) 9/39; Oberst Johann Gehfink ( ? - Aug 43) 3/43; Obstlt. Georg Kugel (Aug 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete) Stab/2. Fliegerdivision (Sep 44); Koflug Giebelstadt (Jul 39 – c.Aug 40); 8. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 53; Werft-Abt. (v) 117/XII (1944-45); schw.Feldwerft-Abt. V/30 (Mar 45); 118. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Sep 44); 129. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Sep 44); 136. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Sep 44); 3. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (S) (Sep 44); 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (S) (Sep 44); Flugh.Betr.Kp. (FK) 3 (Sep 44); Lufttorpedo-Betr.Kp. 2 (Sep 44); Lufttorpedo-Betr.Kp. 7 (Sep 44); Lufttorpedo-Betr.Kp. 8 (Sep 44); Lufttorpedo-Betr.Kp. 9 (Sep 44); D 1 R – Nachschublager d.Lw. 1/XII (1944-45); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 6/XIII (Apr 40); Startbahnbauzug 1 (summer 44); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Giebelstadt. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.156-58 (17 Nov 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Gieboldehausen (GER) (51 36 27 N – 10 13 13 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Lower Saxony 21 km NE of Göttingen and 9.5 km SW of Herzberg am Harz. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Giessen (GER) (50 35 40 N – 08 43 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 50 km N of Frankfurt/M. in Hesse and 3.6 km ENE of the town center of Giessen. History: 1928 classified as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). In military service from 1932 and then built out as a full Luftwaffe air base 1936-37. Used almost exclusively by bomber units to mid-1940. Dimensions: approx. 1145 x 915 meters (1,250 x 1,000 yards). Runway: grass surface with concrete starting platforms on the E and W boundaries, paved hangar aprons and a perimeter road that

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 connected the hangars with the starting platforms. Equipped for night landings. Infrastructure: fuel, numerous refueling points, communications, ammunition dump, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. Had 7 hangars along the S boundary, including 1 large repair hangar, with workshops and stores buildings off the SW corner of the airfield. Control tower between the hangars and barrack blocks behind the hangars. Airfield served by a branch rail line. Dispersal: 7 open aircraft shelters and 4 or 5 blast bays off the SW corner (Apr 44); later, 5 large open shelters were built off the NE corner. Defenses: none identified in Dec 43. Satellites and Decoys: Giessen-Daubringen (GER) (50 38 10 N – 08 44 45 E). Dummy 5 km NNE of Giessen airfield. Mock-up included representations of 4 hangars plus station buildings at the edge of a woods on the E boundary with dummy aircraft parked near the buildings. Believed to have been equipped with a lighting system. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.612 (11 Nov 44)] Remarks: 20 Jul 44: bombed by 12 B-17 Fortresses. 9 Sep 44: attacked by 9th AAF P-47 Thunderbolts with claims for 3 aircraft destroyed on the ground and several more damaged. Also attacked same date by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 1 x Bf 109 and 1 x Ju 88 destroyed. 24 Dec 44: bombed by 74 B-17s and heavily damaged; urgent repairs underway. 28-29 Mar 45: Giessen taken by U.S. 7th Armored Div. Operational Units: II./KG 254 (Apr-Nov 38); Stab, II./KG 155 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); Stab, II./KG 55 (May-Aug 39); I./KG 53 (Sep 39); I./KG 4 (Oct-Nov 39); Stab, I./KG 1 (Jan-Jun 40); 1./JG 3 (Feb 40); 2./JG 3 (Mar 40); I./LLG 1 (Sep 44); Staffel z.b.V. Reich (Oct-Nov 44); Flieger-Kp./Ln.-Rgt. 3 (c.Nov 44 – Mar 45). School Units: Flieger-Techn.Schule 1 (c. 1940-45); Lehrwerft Giessen (Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Giessen (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 32/VII (c.Jan 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 5/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 21/VII (Jun 44 – Mar 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Oberst Dipl.Ing. Rudolph Schmock (22 Mar 42 - 1 Jan 43). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Luftgaukdo. 11 (Apr-Oct 37); Stab/Luftgaukdo. XII (Oct 37 – Mar 38); Koflug Giessen - 221 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (Jul 39 – c.Aug 40); Flugzeugschleuse (aircraft routing center); 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 55 (May-Aug 39); 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 55 (MayAug 39); Werft-Kp. 9 (n.d.); I./Flak-Rgt. 111 (gem. mot.) (Aug 39 – 1940); III.(Tel.Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. 10 (Giessen and Lohra, c.Nov 44 – Feb 45); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 40 (Holzheim, Jan 45 - ? ); I./Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 12 (Jul 38 - ? ); 12.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 12 (1939-45); Fluko Giessen; Ln.-Flugsicherungshauptstelle 14 (1944-45); Lw.-BauRgt. Giessen (1940); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 3/XII; Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 110/IV (summer 44); KriegsSanitätsoffiziernachwuchs-Kp. d.Lw. 22 ( ? – 1944/45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.201-04 (1 Feb 44 updated to 1 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gifhorn (GER) (a.k.a. Isenbüttel) (52 27 10 N – 10 33 00 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) 25 km N of Braunschweig in Lower Saxony and 2.25 km S of Gifhorn town center. History: 1932 listed as a civil landing ground and aviation sports field (Verkehrslandeplatz and Sportflugplatz). Ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936 but these plans evidently postponed and then downsized. In 1944 it was used to park aircraft, some of these belonging to deactivated or disbanded units. Remarks: 8 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 1 x Me 210, 5 x Ju 88s and 1 x Do 217 destroyed. 11 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 1 x Bf 109, 1 x Fw 190, 4 x Bf 110s, 7 x Ju 88s destroyed, plus 1 x Ju 52 and 2 x unidentified aircraft damaged. Operational Units: Stab with parts of I. and II./KG 30 (Oct-Nov 44). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.629 (29 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gillrath (GER) (a.k.a. Geilenkirchen-Gillrath) (50 58 25 N – 06 04 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 22 km N of Aachen, 3.25 km WNW of Geilenkirchen and immediately S of the village of Gillrath. History: no record of use. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 500 x 500 meters (550 x 550 yards). Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.631 (18 Jun 41); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gindrich (GER) (c. 51 37 48 N – 06 34 05 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 6 km SW of Wesel. History: No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gitter (GER) (52 01 46 N – 10 21 51 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Lower Saxony 30 km SSW of Braunschweig and 2.5 km SSW of the town of Salzgitter (Bad Salzgitter). History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gladbach-Rheydt (GER): see Mönchen-Gladbach. Glatz (GER) (a.k.a. Glatz-Konturhof; Glatz/West; Klodzko) (c. 50 26 N – 16 39 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Silesia c. 76 km SSW of Breslau and 48 km W of Neisse (Nysa). History: no information found prior to its use in early 1945 following the beginning of the Russian winter offensive in Poland in mid-January 1945. Operational Units: Stab, 2./NAGr. 2 (Mar-Apr 45); 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 31 (Mar 45); Stab/NAGr. 4 (Apr-May 45). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): I./Flak-Rgt. 7 (gem.mot.) (1945); 7.(le.Flum.)/Ln.-Rgt. 229 (1945); Lw.-Lazarett (o) 7/III (1945). [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gleiwitz (GER) (a.k.a. Gliwice) (50 16 15 N – 18 40 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Silesia 148 km SE of Breslau (Wroclaw) and 94 km WNW of Kraków; airfield 3 km S of Gleiwitz. History: 1927 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrsflugplatz). By 1932, upgraded to an international airport with a customs office. 1939-40 classified by the Luftwaffe as an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen). The airfield’s main wartime function was to support the large air park (Luftpark) located there that inventoried and supplied aircraft parts and components. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 1100 meters (1000 x 1200 yards) and roughly irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Had either a hardened runway or a long starting platform. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, a flare path and a beam approach system for night landings.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were at the NW corner; also had bulk fuel storage. Infrastructure: had 1 large and 5 medium hangars off the N boundary, all with paved aprons and interconnected by taxiways. Also off the N boundary were the admin offices, barracks, messes and other station buildings. The flight control building was probably in the NW corner. The Gleiwitz-Ratibor rail line ran just E of the landing area. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 23-25 Jan 45: infrastructure demolished and airfield evacuated as Soviet forces advanced into Silesia. Operational Units: Stab, II./Schl.G. 2 (Dec 42 – Apr 43). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 19 then FFS B 19 (Ohlau) (Sep 41 – Jun 44). Erg./Ers. Units: Erg.Gr./JG 51 (Jan – Feb 42); 2./Erg.JGr. Ost (Feb – Sep 42). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 6/VIII (1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 18/VIII (1943 – Mar 44), Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 1/VIII (Apr 44 – Jan 45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Hptm. Ernst Ziffer ( ? - 26 Aug 39); Hptm. Adolf Zaiser (Apr 40 ? ); Oberst Kuno Berger (31 Oct 41 - c. Mar 43). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftpark Gleiwitz (later Luftpark 2/VIII) (c. 1938-44); Werft-Abt. 12/VIII (1944 – Jan 45); Hei.Flak-Abt. 51/VIII (Oct 43 – Oct 44); mittl.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 6/VIII (1944); schw.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 229/VIII (1944 – Jan 45); schw.Hei.FlakBttr. 254/VIII (1944 – Jan 45); Lw.-Bauamt 4/VIII (1941-44); Hauptlohnstelle d.Lw. 1/VIII (Dec 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.622 (10 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Glienicke (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to an unidentified airfield, but possibly either Staaken or Schönwalde, both on the NW side of Berlin. Glogau (GER) (a.k.a. Glogau-Zerbau, Glogów, Glogów-Serby) (51 42 00 N – 16 07 00 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Silesia 90 km NW of Breslau (Wroclaw) and 5 km NE of Glogau. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 224 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Gmünd (GER) (a.k.a. Schwäbisch Gmünd) (48 48 48 N – 09 48 18 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 44 km E of Stuttgart; airfield 1 km E of Gmünd. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: Grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Remarks: 20 Apr 45: town taken by U.S. 114th Division. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gochsen (GER) (49 14 06 N – 09 21 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Wurttemberg 14.5 km NE of Heilbronn. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: chronologies; AFHRA, BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Goddelsheim (GER) (51 12 02 N – 08 48 27 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Hesse 48 km WSW of Kassel and 9.5 km SSW of Korbach. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Godshorn (GER) (52 26 15 N – 09 42 15 E) General: satellite field of Hannover-Langenhagen airfield, 8 km N of Hannover city center and 2.5 km SSE of Hannover-Langenhagen airfield. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface? Infrastructure: none reported. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Goldhausen (GER) ( ?? ) General: landing ground (Landeplatz). Location unknown. Listed as operational in Feb 45. No other information. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Göllheim (GER): see Dreisen-Göllheim. Göppingen (GER) (48 42 30 N – 09 41 30 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Baden-Württemberg 40.5 km ESE of Stuttgart; airfield 3.25 km E of Göppingen and 1.6 km NW of Eislingen village. History: built in the early 1930’s and a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Used mainly as a elementary flight training field during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 685 meters (1150 x 750 yards) aligned NW/SE. Surface and Runways: grass surface with some paving in the take-off area. A perimeter track encircled the landing area. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling loop on the SE boundary and refueling points on the NE, SE and S portions of the landing area. A small ammunition store was off the boundary to the SE. Infrastructure: had 2 large hangars with paved aprons and 3 medium hangars off the N boundary. Station motor pool and garages were adjacent to the most westerly hangar and there were numerous station buildings hidden in the woods to the N of the hangars, including admin offices, barracks, stores, etc. The control tower was probably in front of the hangars. Nearest rail connects at Göppingen and Eislingen stations. Dispersal: no organized dispersals, but 2 large open aircraft shelters were constructed in early 1944 off the S boundary. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 5 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Ju 87 destroyed, plus 2 x He 177s and 1 x Bf 110 damaged. Operational Units: Aufkl.Gr. 315 (Feb 35 – Mar 36); Aufkl.Gr. 115 (Apr 36 – Sep 37); Aufkl.Gr. 15 (Oct 37 – Oct 38); Stab/Aufklärungsgeschwader 13 (Nov 38 – Aug 39?); Aufkl.Gr. 13 (Jan-Aug 39); Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 1/7 (Jan – c.May 39); 2. (H)/Aufkl.Gr. 23 (Apr 40). School Units: Höh.Kdr.d.FFS A/B (Jul 43 – Nov 43); Höh.Kdr.der A Schulen (Nov 43 – 1945); 1. Fliegerschuldivision (Oct 43 – Feb/Mar 45); FFS A/B 116 then FFS A 116 (Jun 41 – c. Dec 44); Flakartillerieschule IV (Oct 39 - ? ); Luftkriegsschule 8 (Flak) (Aug 41 – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Göppingen (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 11/VII (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 9/VII (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates on the airfield, in the town or nearby – not complete): Werft-Abt. 9/VII (1944); Werft-Abt. (v) 135/XII (1944-45); Werft-Kp. 4 (1940-41); II./Flak-Rgt. 25 (gem. mot.) (Oct 36 – Nov 38); le.Flak-Abt. 85 (mot.) (Nov 38 – 1939); schw.Flak-Abt. 136(o) (1945)?; le.Flak-Abt. 851 (mot.) (Aug 39 – 1940); le.Res.FlakAbt. 852(v) (Jul-Aug 40); le.Flak-Abt. 853(v) (Jul-Aug 41); - 226 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 le.Res.Flak-Abt. 854(v) (Jul-Aug 41); le.Flak-Abt. 855(o) (Jul-Aug 42); le.Flak-Abt. 856(o) (Jul-Aug 42); Traktorenzug d.Lw. 12/VII (1944); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 126/VII (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.160-63 (10 Jan 44 updated to 23 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Göritz (GER) (c. 53 24 50 N – 13 54 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Mecklenburg 11 km N of Prenzlau. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: Grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Görlitz (GER) (51 09 42 N – 14 57 10 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Silesia 86 km E of Dresden and 2.5 km WNW of Görlitz. History: airfield in use since 1925 by civil aviation and airships and was being used as a commercial airport in 1932. Luftwaffe use dates from 1934. Görlitz was an elementary flight training station until 1945 when it was taken over by fighters and ground-attack units. Dimensions: approx. 775 x 595 meters (850 x 650 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: level grass with a gravel sub-soil. No paved runway. A perimeter road ran along the N and W boundaries. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel available and ammunition as needed. Infrastructure: had 1 very large, 1 large and 1 medium hangar off the W boundary with nearby workshops. Admin offices, barracks, classrooms and other station buildings were off the NW corner. The Görlitz-Wehrkirch rail line closely paralleled the E boundary of the landing area. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: elements of KGr. z.b.V. 9 (Sep 39); III./SG 2 (Feb 45); II./JG 6 (Mar-May 45); 10.(Pz.)/SG 77 (Apr-May 45). School Units: elementary flight school Görlitz (Jan 35 – Dec 39); FFS A/B 1 later FFS A 1 (Jan 40 – Feb 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: III./Erg.JG 1 (Apr 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Görlitz (to 1943); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 46/III (1 Apr – 15 Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/VIII (15 Jun 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Theodor Rumpel (Nov 42 ? ).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Lw. Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Stab/17. Flak-Div. (Apr 45); Stab/Luftgaukdo. VIII (Sep/Oct 44 – Jan 45); Luftgaustab z.b.V. 25 (Jul-Sep 44); Koflug 2/VIII (c.Sep 44 – Feb 45); Werft-Abt. 53/III (1944-45); elements of Flak-Sturm-Rgt. 1 (mot.) (Jan 45); elements of le.Flak-Abt. 90 (mot.) (Mar 45); 10.(Celebes III)/Ln.-Flugmelde-Abt. (E) z.b.V. 21 ( ? - Feb 45); Lw.-Lazarett 10/VII (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.623-24 (26 Jun 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gorow (GER) (a.k.a. Gorowo Ilaweckie, Górowo Iławeckie) (c. 54 17 N – 20 29 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in East Prussia 72 km ENE of Elbing and 45 km ESE of Braunsberg (Braniewo). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use after the Polish campaign. Operational Units: I./St.G. 1 (Aug-Sep 39). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Goslar (GER) (51 55 35 N – 10 26 20 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 40 km SSW of Braunschweig in Lower Saxony and 1.5 km N of Goslar. History: dates from 1925-26 when a 600 x 600 meter civil landing ground was opened. 1927 classified as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). The first hangar was erected in 1932 and it was reclassified as a civil airport (Flughafen II). The Luftwaffe took it over and in May 1935 began developing it into an air base with dimensions now of 3,500 x 2,400 meters. Officially designated as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur on or about 1 October 1936 with 5 aircraft hangars, a repair hangar, a flying control building, admin and supply buildings, messes, motor pool garages, several blocks of barracks and other infrastructure. By 1937, a total of 95 airfield buildings had been built in about two years. Reconnaissance units (Aufklärungsverbände) were based at Goslar before the war and it was used mainly by training units and glider-borne air-landing transport units after that. Italian and German transport units were equipped here in 1944 with Italian transport planes. The development and testing of equipment for night fighters moved to Goslar in 1944 and in 1945 Goslar was selected to training pilots for the He 162 jet fighter. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 960 meters (1,400 x 1,050 yards). Runway: grass surface with a perimeter road circling the landing area. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications, ammunition dump, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. See above for hangars, buildings, etc. The nearest rail connection was in Goslar. - 228 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: the Northeast area and the Southwest area had a total of 10 open aircraft shelters with 2 more under construction and at least 18 blast bays in mid-1944. Defenses: 4 light Flak positions within 1.5 km of the field in Jan 44, two of which were rooftop emplacements. Remarks: Nov 40 – Nov 42: inmates from Buchenwald concentration camp were used on the airfield. 11 Jan 44: 53 Italian Savoia S. 81 and S. 82 transports identified on the ground at Goslar. 29 Mar 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed and 2 x Me 108s damaged. 5 Aug 44: bombed by 9 B-24 Liberators as a secondary target. 24 Aug 44: bombed by 37 B-17 Fortresses with severe damage to several buildings including a hangar and the loss of 1 x He 45D and 1 x He 46E belonging to Fliegerbildschule II. 10 Apr 45: captured by U.S. forces after station personnel demolished most of the technical facilities. Operational Units: Stab/Aufkl.Gr. 127 (See) (Apr-Sep 37); Stab/Aufkl.Gr. 27 (Oct 37 – Oct 38); Stab/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Nov 38 – May 40); 1.(F(/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Nov 38 – Mar 40); 2.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); Wekusta 26 (Jul-Nov 39); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Sep 39 – May 40); 5. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Oct-Nov 39); Aufkl.St. Fliegerdivision 7 (Mar-Apr 40); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (May 40); Aufkl.St. XI. Fliegerkorps (Jul 40 – Apr 41); III./KG 3 (Jun 41); 2.(DFS)/Verbindungskdo. (S) 1 (Dec 42); II./KG z.b.V. 1 (Feb-Apr 43); IV./TG 1 (Jun-Oct 43, Nov/Dec 44 – Jan 45); I./KG 27 (Sep 43 – Jan 44); III./TG 2 (Aug 43); II./TG 5 (Oct 43 – c. Feb 44); II./TG 1 (Oct 43 – Mar 44, Sep 44); Transportfliegergruppe 10 (Ital.) (Jan-Apr 44); Transportfliegergruppe 110 (Ital.) (Jun-Oct 44); III./LLG 1 (Nov 44); I./TG 4 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); 3./NAGr. 1 (Apr 45); Nahaufkl.St. 13./14 (Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 52 (Halberstadt) (193940); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 16 then FFS B 16 (Burg bei Magdeburg) (May 40 – Apr 45); Fallschirmjäger-Offiziersschule (Oct 44 – Apr 45); Fliegerbildschule II (1943/44 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (Mar – Apr 45). Station Commands: 27 Aug 42 as Fl.H. Goslar; Flugplatzkdo. Goslar of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 26/XI Hildesheim (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Heinrich Rauch (Oct 39 - Oct 39); Maj. Gottfried Gravert ( ? - Jul 41); Obstlt. Johannes Rockel ( ? - 27 Aug 42); Obstlt. Hans-Detlef von Lieberman (27 Aug 42 - 229 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 - 27 Nov 42); Obstlt. Alexander Andreae (27 Nov 42 ? ); Obstlt. Günther Staroste (Mar 43 - Aug 43); Obstlt. Oskar von der Lühe (Sep 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Goslar (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 1/VI (Apr 41 – Feb 43); Werft-Abt. (o) 31/XI (spring 44 – 1945); Werft-Abt. d.Lw. 3/III (Oct 44); Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 5/XI (Aug 42); Kleine Zahnstation d.Lw. 2/XI (Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.209-12 (12 Feb 44 updated to 19 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Gotha (GER) (50 56 48 N – 10 42 33 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): I./Flak-Rgt. 3 (gem. mot.) (Oct 35 – 1939/40); schw.Flak-Abt. 301(o) (c.Aug 39 – 1940); gem.Flak-Abt. 302(v) (c.Aug 39 – 1940); gem.Flak-Abt. 303(v) (c.Aug 39 – 1940); Flakscheinw.Abt. 308(v) (c.Aug 39 – 1940); Flakscheinw.Abt. 681(v) (May-Jun 42); Stab/Flak-Ers.Rgt. 4 (Sep 40 – 1944); Flak-Ers.Abt. 19 (Feb 40 - 1945); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 11/IV (1044-45); 5. (Tel.Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. 12 (Cobstädt, Feb 45); 6.(Tel.Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. 12 (Teutleben, Feb 45); Lw.-Lazarett 8/III (n.d.); elements of Lw.-BergeBtl. III (Schnepfenthal, 1944). Gotha/Nord (GER) (a.k.a. Gotha) (50 58 20 N – 10 43 55 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 23 km W of Erfurt in Thuringia and 3 km NNE of Gotha town center. History: taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1936. Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 550 meters (1,000 x 600 yards). A midwar extension changed these to approx. 1190 x 550 meters (1,300 x 600 yards). Runway: two concrete runways measuring 960 meters and 780 meters with a long (500 meters), broad taxiway connecting the ends. Otherwise, grass surface. Gotha/North and Gotha/South were connected by a short concrete taxiway. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications, ammunition dump, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. Station hangars and buildings formed a compact group on the S side of the airfield. Barrack blocks, quarters, messes and other station facilities were behind the hangars of the factory airfield. A very large stores yard that was served by a railway siding was opposite the SW corner of the station buildings. Airfield was served by a branch rail line. Dispersal: a Northeast area and a Northwest area had a total of 28 open aircraft shelters of which 11 were covered with camouflage netting on 25 Feb 44. - 230 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: see Gotha factory airfield. All antiaircraft (Flak) defenses were shared. Satellites and Decoys: Gotha-Racecourse (GER) (50 54 10 N – 10 39 50 E). Dummy 5.7 km SSW of Gotha town center and 8.5 km SW of Gotha airfield. Mock-up included an oval landing area measuring approx. 1100 x 365 meters (1200 x 400 yards) with 3 dummy hangars, a small building and a number of aircraft replicas parked on the racecourse and near the hangars. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.613 (1944)] Remarks: see Gotha factory airfield for bombings. Operational Units: 2.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 114 (Apr 34 – Dec 35); Stab, I./KG 253 (Oct 35 – Apr 39); I./KG 4 (May-Sep 39); III./KG 26 (JanFeb 40). School Units: Aufklärungsschule 3 (Oct 40 – Jul 41); FFS A/B 126 (Jun 41 – Jun 42). Other: Hungarian Fighter School (Mar-Apr 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Gotha (to 1943); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 31/III Erfurt-Bindersleben (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Nikolaus-Wolfgang Maier (c. 1 May 39 - 14 Nov 39). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 4 (May-Sep 39); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 4 (May-Sep 39); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 76. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.213-18 (13 Jan 44 updated to 25 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gotha/Süd (GER) (a.k.a. Gotha-Industrie, Gotha-Waggon) (50 58 00 N – 10 44 35 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) 23 km W of Erfurt in Thuringia; airfield 4 km NE of Gotha. History: used by the Gothaer Waggonfabrik firm for many years before the war and later for the production of Messerschmitt and Focke-Wulf aircraft. Dimensions: approx. 1420 x 870 meters (1,550 x 950 yards). Runway: grass surface with paved hangar apron and paved taxiway. There were 3 concrete starting platforms measuring 320 meters in length on opposing sides of the grass take-off/landing area. Gotha/North and Gotha/South were connected by a short concrete taxiway. Infrastructure: fuel, water, ammunition, communications and other amenities were available. Factory hangars (4 very large and 2 large), assembly buildings, component, machine, hydraulic press and sheet metal shops were grouped on the W side of the airfield along the engine test beds, motor pool and garages. Airfield was served by a branch rail line. Dispersal: 11 open aircraft shelters. Defenses: 2 heavy and 8 light Flak positions within 2 km of the airfield in March

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 1943. Most of the light Flak was mounted in Flak towers or on rooftops. Remarks: 20 Feb 44: factory bombed by 87 B-24 Liberators. 20 Jul 44: Gotha town bombed by 72 B-24s. 11 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 4 x Ju 88s, 1 x He 177 destroyed, plus 2 x Me 410s, 9 x Ju 88s, 1 x He 177 damaged. 30 Nov 44: Gotha town bombed by 22 B-17 Fortresses as a target of opportunity. 6 Feb 45: Gotha marshalling yards bombed by 88 B-17s as a target of opportunity. 21 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x He 111s destroyed. 28 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Bf 109, 6 x Bf 110s, 1 x Me 410 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x Ju 88 damaged. 31 Mar 45: Gotha town bombed by 20 B-17s as a secondary target. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.213-18 (13 Jan 44 updated to 25 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Göttingen (GER) (51 32 45 N – 09 54 05 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Lower Saxony 38 km NE of Kassel and 2.8 km NW of Göttingen. History construction began in 1934, it was officially designated a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935 and most of the buildings were completed in 1936. Used mainly as a servicing, repair and re-equipping airfield. Wartime development and test center for Horten flying wing aircraft (Nurflügelflugzeuge). Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1100 x 1100 yards). Runway: well-drained grass surface. Equipped for night landings. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications, ammunition dump, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. Had 7 large and medium hangars, all with paved hangar aprons, engine test beds, technical offices, motor pool and garages with nearly all of this at the S end of the airfield. Barrack blocks, admin offices, messes and other station buildings were grouped together off the E boundary. There were also 50+ storage buildings and sheds off the E boundary and NE corner, all served by an elaborate network of branch railway tracks. Numerous additional storage sheds were located in a woods 3.25 km W of the airfield.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: 22 open aircraft shelters and 2 parking sites were located in a North area, a Southwest area and along the airfield perimeter. Defenses: 3 Flak towers for light Flak in December 1943; undoubtedly augmented in 1944. Remarks: Although the Göttingen marshalling yards were repeatedly bombed during the war, the airfield does not seem to have been intentionally targeted. 7-8 Apr 45: Göttingen taken by U.S. forces. Operational Units: Fliegergruppe Z (1935); Fliegergruppe Göttingen (1935-36); Stab/KG 2 (Jun 41); I./KG 2 (Jun 41); III./KG 2 (Jun 41); 2./Versuchsverband Ob.d.L. (c.Dec 44 – Apr 45); Erprobungskdo. 9 (a.k.a. Sonderkdo. Göttingen) (1942-45); Fliegerforstschutzverband (1943 – Dec 43); Erprobungskdo. 40 (Jan-Nov 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS 2 (Berlin-Gatow) Kdo. Oedheim (c. 1941-42); Nachschubschule Göttingen (c.1938 – Oct 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 50/VI (summer 1940); Fl.H. Göttingen (to c.Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 45/XI (5 Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 27/XI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandanten (not complete): Maj. Gustav Banse (1935-37?); Obstlt. Josef Grauer (Jun 40 - ? ); Oberst Max-Arnim, Protzen von Schramm (1 Oct 42 - ? ); Oberst Karl Dauselt (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Aerodynamische Versuchsanstalt (AVA); Luftzeugamt 1/VI (c. 1938-45); Luftpark Göttingen (c. 1938-41); Flakpark Göttingen (1939-40); Flakzeugamt 1/VI (1943-45); Werft-Abt. (o) 27/XI (spring 44 – 1945); 5./le.FlakAbt. 772 (1943-44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 384/VI (Sep 41); FliegerUntersuchungsstelle 13/III (Apr 45); Luftfahrtmedizinisches Institut des Reichsluftfahrtministeriums (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.219-22 (6 Jan 44 updated to 6 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Götzenhain (GER) (49 59 45 N – 08 45 15 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Hesse 14.5 km SE of Frankfurt/Main and 1.2 km E of Götzenhain. History: probably laid out in summer 1944 for use by fighters. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 915 x 68 meters (1000 x 75 yards) aligned NNW/SSE. Infrastructure: none. Dispersal: aircraft could park adjacent to the strip along the edge of a woods. Operational Units: I./JG 4 (Sep-Oct 44); III./JG 53 (Oct 44). Station Units: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.166 (18 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grafenwöhr (GER) (49 42 30 N – 11 58 00 E) - 233 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in Bavaria 67 km ENE of Nürnberg; airfield 1 km S of Grafenwöhr. History: existed pre-war. No record of use by Luftwaffe air units during the war and believed to have been returned to cultivation. Surface and Dimensions: firm, dry meadowland measuring approx. 460 x 250 meters (500 x 270 yards). Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.453 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Greifswald (GER) (54 06 30 N – 13 26 30 E) General: Fliegerhorst 31 km SSE of Stralsund on the Baltic Coast in Pomerania. History: dates from 1915 when a naval air station was established at Greifswald that in 1933 was being used as a university sports flying ground. A Deutschen Verkehrsflieger Schule (D.V.S.) took over the field in 1934. Officially designated a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur on 1 April 1935. It was home station for the Luftwaffe’s elite Lehr or demonstration/instructional units. Greifswald was a very large, very busy airfield during the war years. The Arado aircraft manufacturing firm took over one of the hangars at Greifswald in 1943 for assembly work on the Fw 190 fighter. Day and night fighter air defense units made increasing use of Greifswald during 1944-45. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 1100 meters (1200 x 1200 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface with paved hangar apron and taxiway. Fuel and Ammunition: there were refueling points along the N side and a refueling hardstand at the SE corner. Infrastructure: fully servicing and fueling facilities with 6 large hangars, additional workshop buildings among and behind the hangars, flight control (Flugleitung), station HQ and supply buildings, officer quarters, messes and numerous barrack blocks surrounding a large sports ground and gym. The building area was all on the S side of the field, especially at the SE corner. The munitions dump was along the W boundary and was served by a branch railway that also ran behind the hangars and into the main building area. A branch rail line from Greifswald served the S side of the airfield and the munitions dump on the W boundary. Dispersal: not reported. Defenses: not reported. Satellites and Decoys: Griefswald-Wampen (GER) (54 08 35 N – 13 24 30 E). Dummy 6 km NNE of Griefswald, 4.5 km NNW of Griefswald airfield and 1.2 km NNW of the village of Wampen. Mock-up used to have 2 phony hangars but these were removed in 1943 or 1944. It had little - 234 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 resemblance to Griefswald airfield. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.965 (1944)] Remarks: 30 Apr 45: airfield taken without resistance by advancing Soviet troops. Operational Units: II./KG 152 (Oct 35 – Mar 37); Lehrgeschwader Greifswald (Oct 36 – Oct 38); Stab/KG 152 (Apr-Sep 36); III./KG 152 (Apr-Jun 36); Stab, III./LG 1 (Nov 38 – Nov 39); 11.(Nacht)/LG 2 (Aug 39); 1./KG 25 (Sep 39); Stab, I./KG 30 (Sep 39 – Apr 40); I./LG 1 (Oct 39 – Mar 40); 10.(kroat.)/KG 3 (Aug-Oct 41); II./KG 53 (Dec 42 – Jan 43); 4./NJG 5 (c. Jul 43 – Jan 44); I./NJG 2 (Oct 43); IV./NJG 5 (Jan-Apr 45); Erprobungskdo. 26 (Jan-Apr 45); III./KG 53 (Feb-Mar 45); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Feb-Apr 45); I./NJG 100 (Mar-Apr 45); II./KG 4 (Apr 45). School Units: Grosse Kampffliegerschule 3 (Jun 41 – Sep 42); Stab and II./Kampfschulgeschwader 1 (Nov 41 – Jan 43); Stab/KG 101 (Feb 43 – Feb 45); I./KG 101 (May 43 – Sep 44); II./KG 101 (Feb – May 43); III./KG 101 (Jul – Aug 43); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 17 then FFS B 17 (Pütnitz) (Jan 41 – Sep 44); Bomben- u.Zielfinderschule Greifswald (Sep 44 – Mar 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Lehrgruppe Ju 88 (Sep 39 – Mar 40); Erg.KGr. 4 (Mar 40 – May 41); 12./KG 51 (Mar-Jun 41); Erg.St./KG 66 (Aug – Sep 44). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Greifswald (to May 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. 20/III (1943 – 03.44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 2/III (04.44 – 1945). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Hans Jeschonnek (12 Mar 36 30 Sep 37); Maj. Friedrich-Karl Knust (Apr 40 - Jun 40); Obstlt. Kurt Schröder (Jun 40 ? ); Obstlt. Adolf Schmertmann (1 Nov 42 1 Mar 43). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/LuftwaffenLehrdivision (Jul 38 – Aug 39); Koflug Greifswald (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 9/XI (Apr 41 – Feb 43); Koflug 1/III (c.Nov 44 – May 45); 8. Flugh.Betr.Kp./LG 1; Werft-Abt. 17/III (1944-45); 7. Flugh.Betr.Kp. Erg.KGr. 4 (Mar 40 – May 41); 7. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 30 (Aug 39); 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 53 (Dec 42 - Jan 43); III./Flak-Rgt. 411 (Sw. mot.) (Aug 39 – 1940); schw.Flak-Abt. 676(v) (May-Jun 42); le.Flak-Abt. 694 (May-Jul 42); le.Flak-Abt. 850 (Mar-Apr 45); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 9/III (Sep 44 – Apr 45); Flak-Ers.Abt. 16 (Dec 40 - 1945); Flak-Ausb.Abt. 16 (1942); Flak-Waffentechnische Schule IV (1944-45); Stab II. (Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 214 (c.Apr 43 – Aug 44); Stab III. (Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 221 (Sep 44 – Apr 45); Ln.-Lehr-Abt. (Apr 38 – Sep 39); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Greifswald; Lw.-Lazarett 2/III (n.d.). - 235 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.621, 625-27- (2 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Gremsdorf (GER) (49 41 42 N – 10 50 00 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 32 km NNW of Nürnberg and 17.5 km NW of Erlangen. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Greven (GER) (52 05 47 N – 07 37 01 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 16 km N of Münster. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Griesheim (GER): see Darmstadt-Griesheim. Grieslienen (GER) (a.k.a. Gryzliny) (53 36 15 N – 20 22 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in the former East Prussia 122 km S of Königsberg, 22 km SSW of Allenstein (Olsztyn) and 6 km NE of Hohenstein. History: used operationally during the attack on Poland, then by a blind or instrument flying school (BFS 3) during 1941-42, and then as a rest and refit station for bomber Gruppen. In fall 1944, a night nuisance group was in the process of forming at Grieslienen with Ju 87s but this was canceled before it could be completed. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface with a maximum take-off and landing run of approx. 1370 meters (1500 yards). Infrastructure: initially not more than a single hangar and a few sheds for workshops and accommodations, but these limited facilities were considerably augmented during the war years. Remarks: none. Operational Units: I./St.G. 1 (Sep 39); IV.(Stuka)/LG 1 (Sep 39); I./KG 77 (Jul-Nov 43); III./KG 3 (Mar-Jun 44); NSGr. 6 (Sep-Oct 44). School Units: BFS 3 (Oct 41 – Jun 42). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. Grieslienen (1941); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 30/XI (Mar-Jun 41). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Traktorenzug 6/XIII (Dec 41). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.628 (22 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grimma (GER) (51 14 11 N – 12 41 30 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Saxony 22 km SE of Leipzig. The landing ground may have been located just NW of the town. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gros-Caillou (GER): see Kirchberg. Grossborn (GER) (today: Borne Sulinowo) (53 32 00 N – 16 32 00 E) General: two landing grounds, Grossborn/Nord and Grossborn/Süd, located at the Grossborn training ground in Western Pomerania 95 km SE of Kolberg (Kolobrzeg). History: listed as operational in Jan 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: unimproved ground. Infrastructure: unknown. Operational Units: Fliegerübungsstaffel Grossborn (c. 1942-44). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grossburg (GER) (50 52 00 N – 17 04 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Silesia 18 km SW of Ohlau (Olawa). History: set up in 1939 in preparation for the attack on Poland. However, no evidence of its use has been found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: little if any. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.629 (22 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grosse Breite (GER) (c.54 31 N – 09 36 E) General: an at times wide bay that runs from the Baltic (Kieler Bucht/Kiel Bay) southwest to Schleswig. It is unclear whether this was also the name of a seaplane station located there. In any event, a seaplane station command I Class (Einsatzhafen I (See)) was mobilized there in Aug 39. No evidence found of seaplane units being based here. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Grosse Breite (Aug 39 – 7 May 40 then became Fl.H.Kdtr. E 101/XI (See) at Bergen/Norway). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grosselfingen (GER) (48 19 40 N – 08 54 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Baden-Württemberg 56.5 km SSW of Stuttgart, 5 km WSW of Hechingen and 1.6 km SE of the village of Grosselfingen.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 History: construction began in 1937 and the airfield was used to a limited extent for the May 1940 campaign in the West. It was relatively inactive from mid-1940 to 1943 when it became a training field. Dimensions: approx. 595 x 870 meters (650 x 950 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: well-drained grass surface in good condition. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points believed to be along a loop track between the NW corner and the E boundary and underground fuel tanks off the E boundary. Ammunition was stored in 5 ventilated bunkers off the W boundary that was served by a loop road. The machine gun testing range was off the E boundary. There were several rifle ranges off the E and W sides. Infrastructure: had 2 small groups of buildings off the S corner and these may have included workshops. Small clusters of buildings at the S corner and on both sides of the road to Bisingen probably included barrack accommodations. The control tower was believed to be at the SE corner. The nearest rail connection was at Bisingen, 1.6 km SE of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersals. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 19 Jul 44: low-level attack – 3 x Fw 58 C-2s from FFS A 112 destroyed on the ground. Operational Units: II./ZG 76 (Sep-Oct 39). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A 112 (Nellingen) (1943-44); FFS A 112 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Grosselfingen (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 15/VII (1940); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 234/VII Hailfingen (c. Oct 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on the field or nearby on various dates – not complete): Stab/16. Fliegerdivision (Hechingen, Jan-Mar 45); Stab/5. Jagddivision (Hechingen, Dec 44 – Jan 45); elements of II.(Tel.Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. 11 (c.Oct 44 – Feb 45); Flieger-Ers.Btl. VII (Apr 42 - ? ). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.174-75 (24 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grossenbrode (Land and See) (GER) (54 21 30 N – 11 05 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) and seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) 62 km E of Kiel and 7 km E of Heiligenhafen in Schleswig-Holstein; airfield located 2 km S of the village of Grossenbrode. History: construction began in 1937 and continued to 1942. Its primary role was training crews and ground personnel on aerial torpedoes and aerial mines, re-equipping operational units and - 238 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 providing conversion training from one aircraft type to another, resting and refitting combat-depleted units and the formation of new units. It also served as a refueling and rearming airfield for night fighter units. A Luftwaffe airfield survey team stated on 11 Sep 44 that Grossenbrode was unsatisfactory for operations because it was surrounded by woods and swamps, had no camouflage material, its Flak defenses were inadequate and the landing area was too small with two runways ending at the water’s edge. Dimensions: (Land) approx. 1400 x 950 yards) and roughly oval in shape; (Sea) ample take-off and alighting runs for seaplanes in the Binnensee, a large lagoon on the S side of the airfield and in the Baltic along the E boundary. Surface and Runways: grass surface with 2 concrete runways in the shape of an “X”, each of 1,280 meters, and a paved taxiway. Prepared strips paralleled both runways giving each a width of nearly 200 meters. Both runways were illuminated for night landings. Also had a jetty, an adjacent concrete slipway and a rail track for moving seaplanes. There were 8 more jetties that projected into the Binnensee. Fuel and Ammunition: both were available in quantity. Infrastructure: there was 1 large hangar off the W boundary with adjacent workshops. Station buildings, including offices, barracks, messes, officers’ quarters, etc., were in three groups: one off the NE boundary, another at the S corner and the third off the W boundary serving the seaplane station. Further billeting was available in Grossenbrode. A branch rail line served the W boundary of the airfield. Dispersal: had a Northeast dispersal with 4 large uncovered aircraft shelters, 5 open blast bays and 7 parking hardstands. Defenses: had 7 light Flak positions surrounding the airfield in Feb 44. Several of these were emplaced in Flak towers. Remarks: 25 Aug 44: bombed by 11 B-24 Liberators with very little damage resulting. 20 Mar 45: low-level attack by approx. 6 VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x He 111, 1 x Fw 200 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x He 111 and 2 x Ju 52s damaged. According to German reports, 1 x Ju 52 destroyed, and 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x Do 217 damaged. 26/27 Apr 45: night attack by 28 RAF Mosquitos but the bombs fell on inhabited areas outside the station killing at least 12 civilians. 3 May 45: strafed by 24 RAF Tempest fighters causing immense loss to the estimated 200 Luftwaffe aircraft that were either over the airfield

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 or on the ground at the moment of the attack. Eleven of the Tempests failed to return. Operational Units: 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 106 (Nov-Dec 39); 1./Kü.Fl.Gr. 506 (Dec 39 – Jan 40); II./KG 26 (Jun 43 – May 44); 2. Seenotstaffel (JulOct 44); part of II./KG 4 (May 45). School Units: Fliegerwaffentechnische Schule 3 (Minen und Torpedos) (c. 1939 – Sep 44); Torpedoschule d.Lw. (Jun 39 – Oct 41); Kampfschulgeschwader 2 (Oct – Nov 41); 2./JG 102 (Aug-Sep 44); elements of SG 111 (Jan – Mar 45); U-Boot-Übungsstaffel (1945). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 15./SG 151 (Mar – May 45); 12.(See)/SG 151 (May 45). Station Commands: (Land) Flugstützpunktkdo. 38/XI (Nov 41 – 13 Apr 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 55/XI (13 Apr 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Grossenbrode of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 5/XI Lübeck-Blankensee (1944-45). (See) Fl.H.Kdtr. E 123/XI (See) (c.Dec 41 – Apr 43). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Wilhelm Cranz ( ? - c. May 42); Oberst Fritz Schacke (c. 1 Apr 44 - 15 Sep 44); Maj. Hermann Mietzel (15 Oct 44 - 16 Feb 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KSG 2 (Oct 41 - ? ); 4. Flgh.Betr.Kp. KG 26 (Oct 44 - 1945); Lufttorpedo-Betr.Kp. (Sep-Oct 42); Lufttorpedo-Betr.Kp. 8 (Sep-Nov 42); Lufttorpedo-Zug 1 (Sep 42 - ? ); Lufttorpedo-Zug 9 ( ? – Apr 42); Lufttorpedo-Zug 10 ( ? – Apr 42); Lufttorpedo-Zug 13 ( ? – Jul 42); Lufttorpedo-Zug 14 ( ? – Jul 42); Luftminen-Zug 4 (Jul 42 - ? ); Luftminen-Zug 10 (May 42 - ? ); Luftminen-Zug 13 ( ? – Jul 42); Ln.Ausbau-Stab 8 (Mar 43); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 55/XI ( ? – Aug 42); elements of Sonderkdo. d.Lw. Siebel (Jan-Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.630-33 (24 Apr 44 updated to 31 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Grossenhain (GER) (51 18 40 N – 13 33 10 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 31 km NW of Dresden in Saxony and 2.5 km NNE of of Grossenhain. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). Taken over by theLuftwaffe and developed into a major airfield during 1934-35. Inaugurated a Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Served before and during the war as one of the main airfield for the formation and training of reconnaissance units, especially the longrange type. During the last 6 months of the war it was an operational field for fighters and ground-attack units. Dimensions: approx. 1690 x 1000 meters (1850 x 1100 yards) and irregular in shape.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Surface and Runways: grass surface of varying quality with artificial drainage. Had 2 concrete runways in the shape of the letter “T” measuring: (1) approx. 1415 meters (1550 yards) aligned WNW/ESE, and (2) approx. 1370 meters (1500 yards) aligned NE/SW and still under construction in September 1943. Also had a paved taxiway. The operational runway was illuminated and equipped with a beam approach system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: there were 4 groups of refueling points at the NW, N, S and SW sides of the landing area. The station ammunition dump was off the N boundary. Infrastructure: had 10 hangars – 3 very large, 5 large and 2 medium, all of which had concrete aprons. Workshop buildings were adjacent to the hangars at the SW corner and there was a large motor pool and garages just W of a large barracks complex off the SW corner. Station admin offices, officers’ mess, the flight control building and other facilities were also at the SW corner. A branch rail line served the S, W and N sides of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Aircraft generally parked off the E boundary. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: Aufkl.Gr. 323 (Mar 35 – Mar 36); Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Apr 36 – Sep 37); Aufkl.Gr. 23 (Oct 37 – Oct 38); Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Apr-Aug 39); 5.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Oct 40 – Apr 41); Lehr-u.Erprobungskdo. 24 (Mar 43 – Oct 44?); II./ZG 76 (Nov 44 – Feb 45); 14.(Eis.)/KG 3 (c. Nov 44 – Mar 45); Stab, II./SG 2 (Feb-Mar 45); 1.(Pz)/SG 9 (Feb-Apr 45); III./JG 54 (Feb-Apr 45); I., III./JG 27 (Apr 45). School Units: Aufklärungsschule Grossenhain (Sep 39 – Jan 40); Aufklärungsschule 1 (Jan 40 – Oct 42); Fernaufklärungsschule 1 (Oct 42 – Feb 43); I./Fernaufklärungsgeschwader 101 (Feb 43 – Feb 45); 5./SG 102 (Jul-Sep 44); 3./SG 102 (Jan-Feb 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Grossenhain (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 41/IV (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 39/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Gen.Maj. Helmuth Mentzel (1939 1941?); Obstlt. Werner Mundt (Jun 40 - Mar 41). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koluft Heeresgruppe Süd (Aug 39); Koluft AOK 4 (Aug 39); Koflug Grossenhain (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 2/IV (Apr-Nov 41); Koflug 7/III (Dec 41 – Apr 45); Werft-Abt. 18/III (1944-45); Werft-Kp. 31 (n.d.); 2./le.Flak-Abt. 728 (1945); Lw.-Bau-Btl. Grossenhain (1939-40); E-Hafen-AusrüstungsKolonne (mot) Grossenhain; Lw.-San.Abt. 7/III (Dec 41 – Apr 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.634-35 (20 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gross-Hennersdorf (GER) (a.k.a. Grosshennersdorf) (50 59 20 N – 14 47 20 E) General: Emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) and/or operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Silesia 76 km E of Dresden, 23 km SSW of Görlitz, 14.5 km N of Zittau and 1.2 km NW of the town of Grosshennersdorf. History: used by a recce squadron (Aufklärungsstaffel) in Oct 38. Wartime use unknown, but no operational units were based there. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: no information. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.957 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gross Herzberg (GER) ( ?? ) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania/West Prussia in the Neustettin (Szczecinek) area c. 60-70 km SSE of Köslin (Koszalin) and near a small village of the same name. History: operational during the Sep 39 attack on Poland. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: probably grass. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gross-Kosel (GER) (a.k.a. Gross-Koslau?) (53 19 30 N – 20 17 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in the former East Prussia 53 km SSW of Allenstein (Olsztyn) and c. 9 km WSW of Neidenburg (Nidzica). History: No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grossostheim (GER) (49 56 00 N – 09 02 15 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 10 km SW of Aschaffenburg, 5 km WNW of Grossostheim and 2.4 km ENE of the village of Schaafheim. History: construction began in 1936 with a small number of buildings camouflaged as a farmstead. The completion ceremony was held on 7 May 1937. The field was activated on 26 Aug 39 and construction began on a small number of barracks in the woods at the N end. Used for glider training after summer 1940, the formation of a transport unit in late spring 1943 and then by fighter and transport units from 30 Aug 44 to the end of the war. A top secret research facility was located on the perimeter of the airfield 1942-44

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (development of radioactive and non-radioactive beam or ray weapons). Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 915 meters (1100 x 1000 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Runway: grass surface. No paved runway. Equipped with a flare path for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were probably along the E boundary and ammunition was stored in a building at the NE corner. Infrastructure: no formal hangars or workshops. See above under History. Airfield served by a branch of the main AschaffenburgEberbach rail line. Dispersal: had a Northwest dispersal area in woods off the NW boundary with 30+ aircraft bays. More bays and parking hardstands were under construction in Jan 45 in the woods off the E boundary. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 18 Nov 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 3 x Bf 109s, 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x He 111 destroyed, plus 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 24 Dec 44: airfield bombed by 60 B-17 Fortresses and heavily damaged; urgent repairs underway – 2 x Fw 190As from III./JG 11 destroyed (1) or damaged (1) on the ground. 5 Jan 45: bombed – 2 x Fw 190As from III./JG 11 destroyed on the ground. 14 Mar 45: bombed by approx. 90 B-26 Marauders – numerous bursts on landing area and major destruction to buildings; at least 1 KIA. (German report) 25-26 Mar 45: airfield evacuated by the Luftwaffe. Operational Units: III./KG 53 (Sep 39); II./KG 2 (Apr-May 40); I./KG 53 (May-Jun 40); TGr. 30 (May-Jun 43); III./JG 11 (Dec 44 – Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Gross-Ostheim (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 20/XII (Mar 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 221/XII Zellhausen (Nov/Dec 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 3. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 2; 1./le.Flak-Abt. 715 (Jan-Feb 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.176 (10 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Gross Reken (GER) (51 49 59 N – 07 02 40 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 42 km WSW of Münster and 20.5 km NNE of Dorsten. History: listed as operational Jan-Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grossrückerswalde (GER): see Marienberg-Moosheide. Grosssachsenheim (GER) (a.k.a. Gross Sachsenheim, Sachsenheim) (48 57 00 N – 09 02 45 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) later upgraded to an airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Baden-Württemberg 16 km NNW of Stuttgart and 2 km SW of Sachsenheim. History: built 1941-43. In Apr 42, extensive work was underway leveling the landing area and laying down the runway. Used as a practice field for trainers before it was completed. Day fighters were based here in spring 1944 and then night fighters from Sep 44 to Mar/Apr 45. Dimensions: approx. 1715 x 985 meters (1875 x 1075 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface with paved taxiways. Had a single concrete runway approx. 1600 meters (1750 yards) in length. Fuel and Ammunition: available or brought in as needed. Infrastructure: no hangars or workshops. A small group of barrack huts was off the N and S boundaries. The nearest rail connection was in Sachsenheim. Dispersal: Northwest dispersal, the only one, had 8+ aircraft bays in the woods off and along the NW boundary. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 19 Jul 44: low-level attack by P-51 Mustangs – 4 x Ju 88s from Luftbeobachterstaffel 7 destroyed. (German report) 8 Oct 44: low-level attack – several Ju 88 R-2s and Bf 110s from I./NJG 6 destroyed or damaged. (German report) 19 Dec 44: low-level attack by P-47 Thunderbolts – 3 x Ju 88s from I./NJG 6 destroyed or damaged. (German report) 15 Feb 45: bombed and strafed – 1 x Ju 88 damaged. (German report) 23 Mar 45: bombed and strafed by approx. 19 P-47s – 2 x Bf 109s, 4 x Bf 110s and 2 x Ju 88s damaged. (German report) Operational Units: III./JG 301 (Apr-May 44); Luftbeobachterstaffel 7 (Jul 44); I./NJG 6 (Sep 44 – Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 116 then FFS A 116 (Göppingen) (1941-44). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. Gross Sachsenheim of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/VII Echterdingen (Apr-Sep 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 217/XII (Oct/Nov 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 215/XII (Oct/Nov 44 – Feb 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt.(v) 109/XII (1944-45). - 244 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.344 (18 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gross-Schiemanen (GER) (52 28 45 N – 20 57 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in the former East Prussia 10 km S of Ortelsburg (Szczytno) and probably just W of GrossSchiemanen village. History: laid out during the 1940-41 airfield construction program in Poland in preparation for the attack on the Soviet Union in June 1941. Used as a practice field for elementary trainers after that, then became home to a reserve training bomber unit and finally to an operational long-range reconnaissance unit. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface with probable take-off and landing runs of 1370 meters (1500 yards). Infrastructure: no information. The nearest rail connection was about 1 km N of GrossSchiemanen village. Remarks: none. Operational Units: Stab, I., II./KG 4 (Apr-May 42); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 14 (Jul-Aug 44); 2./KG 200 (Oct 44 – Jan 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 51 (Elbing) (1942-43); 4./NJG 102 (Jun – Aug 44); Einsatzgruppe/2. Fliegerschuldivision (Jul – Sep 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./KG 77 (May 43 – Aug 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 15/XI (Apr-Jun 41); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 9/II (Sep 41); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/I (Apr 44 – Jan 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 108/I (Dec 44); Stab/Lw.-Bau-Rgt. 6/XI (1 Jun 41); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 24/XI (1 Jun 41); Lw.-Bau-Kol. 2 (1 Jun 41); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 10/XVII (1 Jun 41); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 3/See (1 Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 92/VI (1 Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 144/VI (Sep 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 205/VI (1 Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 254/VI (1 Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 330/VI (Sep 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 331/VI (1 Jun 41). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.636 (22 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gross-Schönfeld (GER) (53 06 00 N – 14 33 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Pomerania 39 km S of Stettin (Szczecin) with the airstrip just S of the village of Gross-Schönfeld. History: in existence since at least 1937. No mention found of use by the Luftwaffe. Surface and Dimensions: no information. Infrastructure: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.969 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gross Stein (GER) (a.k.a. Kamionek; Kamien Slaski) (50 31 35 N – 18 05 45 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Silesia 19-20 km SE of Oppeln (Opole). History: laid out just before the 1939 attack on Poland. Used as a practice field for single-engine trainers and later for training ground-attack pilots. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: unknown. Operational Units: I./ZG 2 (Aug-Sep 39); 3./NSGr. 1 (Jun 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 110 (Stubendorf) (1940-43); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 9 later A 9 (Grottkau); Störkampffliegerschule Gross Stein (1942-43); 1./SG 111 (Oct 43 – Jan 45). Station Commands: Arbeitsplatzkdo. 9/VIII (Feb-Mar 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. C 15/VIII (Mar 43 – Mar 44). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Transport-BegleitKp. d.Lw. 1/VIII (Krappitz/Krapkowice, Aug 42 - ? ); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 464/VI (Krappitz/Krapkowice, Aug 42 – fall 44?); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 465/VI (Krappitz/Krapkowice, c.Aug 42 – Jan 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.-637 (15 Aug 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gross Tychow (GER) (today: Gmina Tychow) (53 55 41 N – 16 15 28 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Pomerania 19.5 km SE of Belgard (Bialogard). History: Gross Tychow was the location of the Stalag Luft IV camp for mostly USAAF POWs from May 44 to Feb 45. Airfield still listed as still operational Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: natural surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grottkau (GER) (a.k.a. Grodkow Slaski) (50 38 15 N – 17 23 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) 57 km SSE of Breslau, 17 km S of Brieg (Brzeg) in Silesia and 7.3 km S of Grottkau. History: listed as a landing ground at least by 1937 then taken over by the Luftwaffe and operational by fall 1938. Upgraded to a Fliegerhorst in 1940. Used mainly as a training station during the war. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 915 meters (1000 x 1000 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface in good condition. No paved runway. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting as well as a flare path. Fuel and Ammunition: had 2 groups of refueling points on the S boundary, and 1 group at the NW corner. A small ammunition dump was located off the SE corner. - 246 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Infrastructure: 3 large hangars were at the NE corner plus 1 medium hangar set back from the NE boundary, all with paved aprons. Separate workshop buildings were near the medium hangar and the station motor pool and garages were in the same area. The main station buildings were off the NE boundary and included fairly extensive barracks, messes, admin offices and other quarters. A separate and small cluster of barracks huts was at the NW corner. The main Neisse-Grottkau rail line passed close to the W boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 14 Apr 44: construction in progress was observed in the NE corner for a possible extension of the landing area. Operational Units: Schlachtfliegergruppe 50 (Sep-Nov 38). School Units: elementary flight school Grottkau (Jul – Dec 39); FFS A/B 9 then FFS A 9 (Jan 40 – Jan 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./JG 27 (May – Jun 41); Erg.Gr./JG 27 (Jun – Jul 41). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) z.b.V. 168 (26 Aug 39 – c.Feb 40); as Fl.H.Kdtr. Grottkau (to Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 1/VIII (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 3/VIII (Apr 44 – Jan 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Friedrich Ziegler (15 Jan 41 ? ) 11/42; Maj. Kurt von Haustein (acting?) ( ? ? ) 4/41; Hptm. Hans-Joachim? Hagen (acting?) ( ? ? ) 6/41. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/2. Fliegerdivision (Aug-Sep 39). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.638-39 (29 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grunau (GER) (50 54 00 N – 15 47 10 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Silesia 5 km N of Hirschberg (Jelenia Góra). History: Location of the Reichssegelflugschule (State Glider Flight School). Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grunau-Schettnienen (GER) (54 26 30 N – 19 52 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in the former East Prussia 50 km SW of Königsberg (Kaliningrad) and 7 km N of Braunsberg (Braniewo). History: listed as still operational in Jan 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz (gliders) for Schule/FAR 51 then FFS A/B 51 (Heiligenbeil) (1940-42). - 247 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Grüngräbchen (GER) (51 20 45 N – 14 01 15 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Saxony 38 km NNE of Dresden, 20 km SW of Hoyerswerda, 9 km NW of Kamenz airfield and immediately S of the village of Grossgrabe. History: no information. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 460 x 460 meters (500 x 500 yards). Infrastructure: had a small hangar and workshop on the W boundary. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.954 (27 Aug 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Guben (GER) (a.k.a. Guben-Lausitz) (51 59 20 N – 14 43 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) 105 km SE of Berlin, 37 km NE of Cottbus on the Nysa (Neisse); airfield 4 km N of Guben. History: 1932 listed as a secondary airport (Flughafen II). Taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1937 and built into a major training station. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 960 meters (1100 x 1050 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: naturally drained level grass surface on gravel sub-soil. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel storage was said to be in the woods off the N boundary. A small ammunition dump was in a woods NNE of the landing area. Infrastructure: had 1 very large, 3 large and 1 medium hangar along the N boundary, all fronted by a wide servicing hardstand. Separate workshops were behind the very large hangar, which was probably the repair hangar, as well as off the NW boundary. A barracks complex was behind the hangars and the station flight control building was probably situated on the N boundary just W of the very large hangar. Approx 1 km S of the landing area was another barrack complex (probably not Luftwaffe) and 1.6 km SSW was a large ordnance depot. The Guben-Rothenburg rail line passed about a half a kilometer S of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities aside from 1 small covered aircraft shelter on the S boundary. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: Stab, I./JG 4 (Jan-Feb 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: elementary flight school Guben (1935 – Dec 39); Schule/FAR 71 (1939-40); FFS A/B 3 later FFS A 3 (Jan 40 – Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Guben (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 22/IV (c. Feb – Apr 40); as Fl.H. Guben (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 35/III (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 23/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Gerhard Vollschwitz ( ? ? ) 3/42. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 105/VIII (Feb-Apr 45); Werft-Abt. 19/III (1944-45); schw.Flak-Abt. 174(o) (1945); Fluko Guben. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.641-42 (26 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gudendorf (GER) ( ?? ) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) either 9 km S of Cuxhaven in Lower Saxony or 6.5 km S of Meldorf in southeastern SchleswigHolstein. Listed as operational in Feb 45, but no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gülzow (GER) (53 26 00 N – 10 29 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Schleswig-Holstein 32 km ESE of Hamburg and 10 km NW of Lauenburg/Elbe. History: no record of use. Surface and Dimensions: firm, grass surface measuring approx. 730 x 460 meters (800 x 500 yards). Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.632 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gumbinnen (GER/RUSS) (a.k.a. Gusev) (54 36 N – 22 11 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in the former East Prussia 25 km E of Insterburg (Chernyakhovsk). History: used as a staging ground for the June 1944 attack on the USSR and then again in fall 1944 until it was overrun in Jan 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: unknown. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/I. Fliegerkorps (Jun 41); Luftgaustab z.b.V. Russland bei der Heeresgruppe Nord (Jun 41); part of Feldwerft-Abt. I/60 (Nov-Dec 44); gem.Flak-Abt. 802 (Oct 44); Stab/Hei.Flak-Abt. 23/I (1944-45); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 225/I (194445); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 226/I (1944-45); s.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 227/I (1944-

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 45); Stab II./Ln.-Rgt. 130 (Apr-May 42); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 104/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 171/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 294/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 179/XI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 226/XI (Jun 41); elements of Fallschirmjäger-Kriegsberichter-Kp. (c.Dec 44 – Jan 45). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Günzburg (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Leipheim airfield - see there. Güstrow (GER) (a.k.a. Bockhorst) (53 48 25 N – 12 14 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 32 km S of Rostock in Mecklenburg and 4 km E of the town of Güstrow. History: in existence as a landing ground (Landeplatz) in 1935 and then developed by the Luftwaffe into a training station in 1937-38. Dimensions: unknown but an E/W take-off and landing run of approx. 1000 meters (1100 yards) was possible. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the hangars on the W boundary. The station ammunition dump was off the NE corner. Infrastructure: there were 2 very large hangars on the W boundary and at least 4 small hangars on the S boundary. A very large repair hangar was under construction off the W boundary in Oct 43. Behind the hangars on the S boundary were a large number of workshops, barracks and related buildings. The station admin offices, main barracks, messes, etc., were off the W side of the landing area. A large complex of barracks and warehouses was in a wooded area approx. 1 km off the SW corner. Dispersal: not reported, although there was ample room for parking aircraft on the E, N and W sides of the field. Defenses: there were at least 3 light Flak positions around the airfield. Satellites and Decoys: Gustrow-Spoitgendorf (GER) (53 51 00 N – 12 16 20 E). Dummy 9 km NE of Gustrow, 5.5 km NNE of Gustrow airfield and 1 km W of the village of Spoitgendorf. Mock-up included a phony hangar, blast bays containing fake aircraft, a lighting system and a large area for staging decoy fires. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.965 (1944)] Remarks: Operational Units: II./TG 3 (Apr 45). School Units: Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 22 (1939-41); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 10 and FFS A 10 (Warnemünde); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 17 then FFS B 17 (Pütnitz) (Jan 41 – Sep 44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A 72 (194445); 3./JG 103 (Feb 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 14/XI (c.Jan 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Güstrow of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/XI Warnemünde (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Friedrich-Wilhelm Wichardt ( ? ? ) 9/39. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Güstrow (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 17/XI (Apr 41 – Dec 41 or Feb 43?); le.IV/Feldwerftverband 10 (Feb-Mar 45); le.Flak-Abt. 679(v) (May-Jun 42); Flak-Ers.Abt. 60 (1942-44); Flak-Ers.Abt. 91 (1943); VeterinärAusbildungs- und Ers.Abt. d.Lw. 1 ( ? – 1944); Fallsch.Pi.Ers.u.Ausb.Btl. 2 (Jan 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.643-44 (17 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gutenfeld (GER) (a.k.a. Königsberg-Gutenfeld) (54 40 30 N – 20 38 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 12 km ESE of Königsberg in East Prussia. History: built 1936-37. The main Luftpark for Luftgau I located there. During 1943-44 it was the main station for re-equipping Ju 88equipped long-range reconnaissance units with the new Ju 188. Dimensions: not reported. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the hangars at the SE corner, and bulk fuel storage was at the NW corner. Infrastructure: had 5 hangars in a row along the E and SE side of the airfield, all with paved aprons. Numerous workshop buildings were behind the hangars and the flight control building and tower was on the E boundary between two of the hangars. The storage warehouses belonging to the Luftpark were off the SE corner and off the S boundary. Station barracks and admin buildings were just behind the Luftpark buildings off the SE corner. A small cluster of 3 or 4 barracks were situated about a half kilometer off the W boundary. A branch rail line served the hangars, workshops and the equipment depot (Luftpark). Dispersal: a small dispersal area was off the NW corner and had (in Apr 44) 3aircraft shelters. Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Remarks: Operational Units: Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 1/1 (c. Jan-May 39); I./JG 21 (Jul-Aug 39); KGr. z.b.V. 106 (Jun-Jul 41); II./KG z.b.V. 1 (Sep-Oct 41); I./KG 4 (Jan-Feb 43); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 10 (Apr 43); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (May-Oct 43); 4./Gruppe Nord (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (May 43 – 1944); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Sep-Nov 43); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. - 251 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 22 (Sep 43 – Jan 44); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 33 (Oct 43 – Mar 44); 2. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 100 (Nov 43 – Feb 44); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 14 (Dec 43 – Mar 44); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Mar-Jul 44); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Mar-Jul 44); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Jun-Jul 44); 14.(Eis.)/KG 55 (Sep 44 – Jan 45); 10.(Pz)/SG 1 (Nov-Dec 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS Fürstenfeldbruck/LKS 4 (Königsberg-Neuhausen) (Nov 39 – Aug 40); Schule/FAR 53 (Nov 39 – Mar 41); Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 53 (1940-41); Fliegerschule d.Lw. (S) 91940 – Jun 41); FFS A/B 122 (Mar 41); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 51 (Elbing) (1942-43). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Ergänzungsgruppe (S) 2 (Dec 40 – Jun 41). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Gutenfeld (1939-43); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 5/I (Apr 44 – Feb 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Felix Wendler (24 Aug 42 - 21 Nov 42). Station Units (on various dates): Umrüstungskommando Ju 188 (1943-44); Werft-Abt. 106/I (Dec 44); Werft-Kp. 34 (c.Mar-Jul 41); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 4 (Jan 43); Flak-Trsp.Battr. Gutenfeld (1941); Luftpark Gutenfeld (later Luftpark 1/XI) (c. 1938-45); Lufttanklager Löwenhagen (Dec 41); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 15/III ( ? – Aug 41); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 116/VI ( ? – Aug 41); Umrüstungskommando Ju 188 (Apr – Sep/Oct 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.644-46 (29 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Güterfelde (GER) (a.k.a. Potsdam-Güterfelde, Babelsberg?) (52 21 20 N – 13 10 20 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) and operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Brandenburg 10 km ESE of Potsdam near Berlin and 1.6 km SW of the village of Güterfelde. History: believed to have been laid out during 1935-36. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 730 x 1000 meters (800 x 1100 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar with an adjacent workshop-type building off the NE corner. A small group of barracks was 1.6 km NNE of the field. The nearest rail connection was in Babelsberg, 5 km to the NNW. Dispersal: there was no organized aircraft dispersal. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS 2 (Berlin-Gatow) (1936-44); Arbeitsplatz for LKS 3 (Werder/Havel) (1936-44); Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. - 252 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.800 (21 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gütersloh (GER) (51 55 30 N – 08 18 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 45.5 km E of Münster in North Rhine – Westphalia; airfield 5.7 km WNW of Gütersloh. History: construction began in 1936, it was ordered designated a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936, and the work was completed in 1937. Gütersloh was a fully-equipped “A” Horst (base) and occupied by bomber units before the war and during the 1940 campaign in the West. After that, it was increasingly used by night fighter units. Dimensions: approx. 1235 x 870 meters (1,350 x 950 yards). Runway: grass surface with a perimeter road. Equipped for night landings, including lighting and a visual Lorenz system. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications, ammunition dump, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. Had 7 large hangars plus 1 large repair hangar in a line along the NE boundary, all with paved aprons. Barrack blocks, messes, officers’ quarters, station HQ, flight control (Flugleitung), motor pool and garages, stores and supply buildings were behind the hangar area. The airfield was served by a branch rail line. Dispersal: the two areas, East and Northwest, had a total of 9 very large open aircraft shelters plus 20 blast bays (3 Jul 44). Defenses: location of Flak positions unknown. Remarks: 1 Apr 44: strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 4 x Ju 88s destroyed. 10 Apr 44: attacked by 27 P-38 Lightning fighter-bombers which dropped 13 tons of bombs on the airfield. 11 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 4 x Fw 190s and 1 x Ju 88 destroyed, plus 7 x Fw 190s damaged. 19 Apr 44: bombed by 62 B-24 Liberators. 31 May 44: attacked by 78 VIII Bomber Command P-47 Thunderbolts which dropped 31 tons of bombs on the airfield – claimed 1 x Me 410 damaged and 6 hangars shot up and damaged. 21 Nov 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 2 x Ju 88s destroyed and 1 more damaged. 23 Jan 45: low-level attack by RAF Tempests – claimed 2 x Ju 52s destroyed and 2 more Ju 52s damaged. 22 Feb 45: bombed – 2 x Ju 88 G-1s from II./NJG 4 destroyed. (German report)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 20 Mar 45: bombed – 16 aircraft destroyed or damaged, including 6 x Bf 109s and 1 x Fw 190; landing area and installations hit; airfield no longer serviceable for night fighter operations; 1 KIA and 6 WIA. (German report) 30 Mar 45: attacked by 58 P-47s which dropped 145 bombs and made several strafing passes claiming 10 Ju 88s, 5 He 111s, 1 Fw 200, 7 Bf 109s, 4 Me 410s and 3 Fw 190s. Additionally, industrial targets and the marshalling yard in Gütersloh were bombed a number of times. Operational Units: IV./KG 254 (Apr 37 – Oct 38); II./KG 254 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); II./KG 28 (May-Nov 39); Stab/KG 54 (Sep 39 – Feb 40); I., II./JG 77 (Nov-Dec 39); I./KG 4 (Feb-Mar 40); II./KG 27 (Mar-Apr 40); II./ZG 1 (May 40); III./KG z.b.V. 1 (May 40); Aufkl.St. Fliegerdivision 7 (May 40); II./KG 54 (May-Jun 40); I./NJG 1 (Jul 40 – Mar 41); III./KG 3 (Nov 41 – May 42); Überführungskdo. Gütersloh (1941-42); Flugzeugschleuse Mittle/Luftflottenkdo. Reich (1942-44); part of II./NJG 5 (May-Aug 44); part of II./JG 2 (Jun 44); I./JG 3 (Jul 44); II./NJG 3 (Aug 44); II./JG 27 (Sep-Oct 44); III./NJG 2 (Sep-Nov 44); Stab/JG 11 (Sep-Oct 44); Stab, II./SG 4 (Oct-Dec 44); Stab, II./NJG 4 (Nov 44 – Mar 45); IV./JG 3 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); III./JG 27 (Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 33 (Quakenbrück) (1941-42). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stab/Ln.-Ers.-u.Ausb.Rgt. 2 (1944-45). Station Commands: Fl.H. Gütersloh (to c.Jan 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 23/VI (c. Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 5/VI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Gustav Ulmer (Sep 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates on the airfield, in town or the immediate area – not complete): Stab/3. Jagddivision (Wiedenbrück, Nov 44 – Mar 45); Koflug Gütersloh (Jul 39 – Aug 40); 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 28 (May-Aug 39); 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 28 (MayAug 39); 4. and 5./le.Flak-Abt. 737 (1944-45); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 26/VI (Dec 43); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 39 (1941-45); I.(FeldfernkabelBau)/Ln.-Rgt. 10 (Rheda-Wiedenbrück, c.Nov 44 – Feb 45); parts of Ln.-Rgt. 14 (Oct 35 – Jun 38); 1.(Fspr.u.Fschr.Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 213 (Herzebrock, c.Sep 44 – Apr 45); 3.(Flum.Ausw.u.Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 213 (Herzebrock, c.Sep 44 – Apr 45); Stab, II./Ln.-Ers.u.Ausb.Rgt. 2 (Mar 44 – 1945); 6.(Ers.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 2 (Feb 44)?; Stab, I. (Betriebs-), III.(Ausb.Abt.f.Ln.Helferinnen) and IV.(Ers.)/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 6 (1938-45); Ln.-Ausbau-Stab 7 (Rheda-Wiedenbrück, fall 44 - 1945); Ln.-Ausbau-Kp. 7 (Beelen, fall 44 – 1945); E-HafenAusrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Gütersloh; Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 399/VI (c.Oct-Nov 41); Feldersatz-Rgt. d.Lw. 1 (Apr 42 – Jul 43); FeldersatzBtl. d.Lw. 1 (c.Jul-Oct 43). - 254 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.223-27 (8 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Gymnich (GER) (50 51 00 N – 06 44 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 19.5 km SW of Köln and 1.6 km NNE of the village of Gymnich. History: used from Nov 39 to May 40 but not again until Sep 44. Dimensions: approx. 1150 x 825 meters (1,250 x 900 yards). Runway: rough grass surface. Infrastructure: fuel, ammunition and other amenities were brought in as needed. There were a few huts at the north end and a machine gun registration range off the W boundary. Nearest rail connection at Brüggen, 2.4 km from the airfield. Dispersal: none (20 May 44). Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 10 Jan 45: targeted by 52 B-17 Fortresses but strong headwinds and heavy Flak over the area prevented a successful attack. Operational Units: I.(Jagd)/LG 2 (Nov 39 – Jan 40); I./JG 1 (Jan-May 40); IV.(Stuka)/LG 1 (May 40); II./JG 11 (Sep 44). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.228 (17 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de]

H Habsheim (GER/FR): see Mühlhausen-Habsheim. Hage (GER) (53 37 05 N – 07 17 10 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) 56 km WNW of Wilhelmshaven, 28 km N of Emden, 6 km ENE of Norden and 1.6 km N of the village of Hage in Lower Saxony. History: built in 1914 as an airship station with 4 immense dirigible hangars, barracks and a gas production facility. Returned to agricultural use after World War I and then taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1935 and by 1937 had been developed into a fully equipped operational airfield with buildings and barracks at the S end and a munitions dump off the NW boundary. A 750 meter concrete runway and a paved taxiway were built beginning at the end of 1940. Hage was used very little after mid-1940. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 1000 meters (1,400 x 1,100 yards). Runway: as already stated. Aside from the concrete runway, the remainder of the airfield was grass in a low-lying area that was very wet during the winter months.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Infrastructure: limited fuel, ammunition and other necessities. Hangars and buildings as already stated. Nearest rail connection was in Hage. Dispersal: none (11 Jun 43). Defenses: at least 1 heavy and 2 light Flak positions. Remarks: 21 Mar 45: bombed by several aircraft – landing area hit. (German report) Operational Units: II./Trägergruppe 186 (Sep 39); I.(Jagd)/LG 2 (Jan 40); IV.(N)/JG 2 (Feb-May 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Hage (Aug 39 – Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 64/XI (Mar-Apr 40); Flugplatzkdo. Hage of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/XI Wittmundhafen (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): elements of schw.Feldwerft-Abt. IV/40 (Feb 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.229-31 (6 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Hagen (GER) (51 21 10 N – 07 29 40 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 16 km S of Dortmund and 4 km W of Hagen. History: used for glider training during the 1930’s but by May 1943 had been abandoned and returned to cultivation. Surface and Dimensions: moorland measuring approx. 365 x 90 meters (400 x 100 yards). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hagenau (GER/FR) (a.k.a. Haguenau) (48 47 45 N – 07 48 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 29 km N of Strasbourg in Alsace; airfield 3 km SE of Hagenau to the E of the railway line that connected Strasbourg with Haguenau. History: a former French Air Force landing ground that was developed into an airfield by the Germans after May 40, including construction of the 2 runways. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 870 meters (1000 x 950 yards) and triangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. There were 2 runways (paved?) – (1) 1000 x 55 meters (1100 x 60 yards) aligned ENE/WSW, and (2) 915 x 27 meters (1000 x 30 yards) aligned NNE/SSW. The ENE/WSW runway was equipped with permanent illumination. Fuel and Ammunition: both available. Infrastructure: had 9 medium hangars with paved aprons on the N boundary, 7 of which were in the NW corner. A large group of buildings behind the hangars included the station HQ, admin offices and barracks. A branch rail line from Haguenau served the hangar area. - 256 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: there were a total of 7 large open aircraft shelters along and off the S end of the field. Defenses: none seen or reported in Apr 43, although the airfield was surrounded by a 6-foot barbed wire fence. Remarks: 13 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 2 x Bf 110s destroyed and 2 more damaged. 23 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 5 x He 111s and 1 x Bf 109 destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109, 9 x He 111s and 14 x Go 242s damaged. 27 May 44: low-level attack by 3 P-47s – 3 x Bf 110s from III./NJG 6 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 14 Aug 44: bombed by 92 B-17 Fortresses. 17 Nov 44: Haguenau bombed by 30 9th AAF medium bombers. Operational Units: Stab/LLG 2 (May-Jun 42); I./LLG 2 (May-Jun 42, Sep 43 – Sep 44); III./NJG 6 (May 44); detachment of II./NJG 5 (MayAug 44); Jagdgruppe 200 (Sep 44); 5.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Sep 44). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. B 1/VII (1942-43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 4/VII (c. Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/VII (Feb-Nov 44). Station and Nearby Units (on various dates – not complete): WerftAbt. 10/VII (1944); elements of gem.Flak-Abt. 261(v) (Sep 44); 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 290 (Nov 44); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 721 (Aug 44); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 828 (Nov 44); 2.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 237 (Sep-Oct 44); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 4/IV (Eschbach – Oct 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 6/VII (summer 44); Sanitätsbereitschaft (mot) d.Lw. 7/VII (1940-41); Sanitätsbereitschaft (mot) d.Lw. 1/XIII (Bischwiller, Sep-Nov 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5259 pp.1646-47 (3 Aug 43 updated to 25 Feb 44) and A5260 pp.2032-34 (3 Aug 43 updated to 25 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hagenow (GER) (53 25 50 N – 11 13 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 31 km WSW of Schwerin in Mecklenburg and 2.5 km E of the town of Hagenow. History: built 1935-36 and established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. 1941 upgraded to a class A airfield (Fliegerhorst). There was almost no activity at Hagenow until the upgrade construction was completed in spring 1942, and by 1943 it was an active training station. Fighter and night nuisance units were there for the final two months of the war. Dimensions: approx. 1140 x 1000 meters (1250 x 1100 yards) with an irregular shape. An extension to the NW allowed for take-off and landing runs of some 1830 meters (2000 yards). Surface and Runways: uneven grass surface. No paved runway. A perimeter road ran along the E boundary. Equipped with boundary

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 and obstruction lighting, a flare path and a beam approach system for night operations. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in the hangar area and the station ammunition dump was off the SE corner. Infrastructure: there were 1 large repair hangar, 4 large flight hangars and 3 medium flight hangars, all with paved aprons and all grouped on the N boundary and in the NW corner. Workshops were to the rear of the hangars and the station motor pool and garages were just E of the repair hangar. The barracks, admin offices, messes and other station buildings were in a group 100-200 meters behind the hangars off the N boundary. The nearest rail connection was 2.5 km SSW of the airfield. Dispersal: had three areas – Northeast, East and Southeast with a total of 14 large open aircraft shelters and 24 parking bays carved into the woods. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 15 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 1 x Bf 110, 2 x Ju 88s and 5 x He 177s destroyed, plus 2 x He 177s and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 21 May 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-38s – several aircraft claimed. Operational Units: KGr. z.b.V. 9 (Feb-Mar 40); III./KG z.b.V. 1 (Apr 40); IV./KG z.b.V. 1 (Apr 40); Luftverkehrsstaffel Habicht (Sep 41 - ? ); part of I./KG z.b.V. 1 (Dec 41); KGr. z.b.V. 106 (Apr-Jun 42); 5. DFS 230-Staffel (Apr-Jun 42); 6. DFS 230-Staffel (Apr-Jun 42); KGr.z.b.V. 104 (Jul 42); part of NSGr. 1 (Mar-Apr 45); I., III./JG 301 (Apr 45); part of NSGr. 20 (Apr 45). School Units: FFS B 35 (Dec 43 – Jun 44); I./JG 115 (Sep-Oct 44); Stab and I./JG 107 (Oct 44 – Apr 45); FFS B 4 (Jan-Mar 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 2./Erg.NJGr. (Oct 44); 2./Erg.JG 2 (Nov 44 – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Hagenow (to c. Jan 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 30/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Hagenow of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 7/XI Schwerin-Görries (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt.d.Lw.(o) 8/XI (spring 44 – May 45); 142. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (c.Nov-Dec 44); Auffanglager d.Lw. Hagenow (Feb 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.646-48 (1 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hagen-Westhofen (GER) (51 25 00 N – 07 30 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 8 km NE of Hagen/Ruhr in North Rhine – Westphalia. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No record of use by the Luftwaffe. Surface - 258 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 and Dimensions: uneven pasture land measuring approx. 732 x 732 meters (800 x 800 yards). Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.632 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hailfingen (GER) (a.k.a. Bondorf) (48 32 30 N – 08 51 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Baden-Württemberg 34 km SSW of Stuttgart and 1.6 km NW of the village of Hailfingen. History: built in 1939 with work still underway in Oct 39. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1100 meters (1300 x 1200 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Had 2 concrete runways measuring approx. 1190 meters (1300 yards) and aligned ENE/WSW, and 320 meters (350 yards) and aligned NNE/SSW. The shorter runway was finished off with hardened strips at both ends giving a total run of approx. 1235 meters (1350 yards). Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the S boundary along with bulk fuel storage. Infrastructure: there were 2 small hangars on the N boundary and small buildings on the S boundary and off the SW corner, these probably including workshops. A few huts off the N boundary and the SW corner probably served as accommodations, with other personnel housed in Hailfingen village. A branch rail line served the N, W and S sides of the airfield. Dispersal: had 3 dispersal areas – East (remote), West (remote) and Perimeter with a total of 3 large covered aircraft shelters, 1 large open aircraft shelter with 3 more under construction, and 2 parking hardstands. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 19 Jul 44: low-level attack by P-51 Mustangs – 8 x Ju 88s from II./NJG 6 destroyed or damaged (German sources). 8 Oct 44: low-level attack – several Ju 88 R-2s and Bf 110s from I./NJG 6 destroyed or damaged (German sources). 25 Feb 45: low-level attack by approx. 4 VIII Fighter Command P-51s – 1 x Bf 110 G-4 and 2 x Ju 88 G-6s from I./NJG 6 destroyed or damaged (German sources). 19 Mar 45: bombed – 2 x Bf 110s and 2 x Ju 88s slightly damaged. (German report) 9 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 5 x Bf 110s, 2 x He 111s destroyed, plus 2 x He 111s and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. - 259 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: parts of I., II./NJG 6 (Jun-Sep 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 234/VII (Oct 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 2. and 3./le.FlakAbt. 721 (Aug 44 – 1945); Flughafenbereichs-Ln.-Kp. z.b.V. 2 (Remmingsheim, Nov 44)?; Luftgaubereichswerkstatt (N) 2/XII (fall 44 – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.177-79 (9 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hainberg (GER) (a.k.a. Nürnberg-Zirndorf) (49 25 25 N – 10 59 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Bavaria 5 km SW of the Nürnberg suburg of Schweinau. 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). History: used by gliders. Unsuitable for operational aircraft. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 685 x 595 meters (750 x 650 yards). Infrastructure: little if any. Defenses: had a Flak tower off the E boundary and another off the S boundary. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.455 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hakendorf-Robach (GER) (a.k.a. Zawadka) (??) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in East Prussia c. 19 km NE of Marienburg. History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Halberstadt (GER) (51 51 20 N – 11 03 20 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Anhalt 55 km SE of Braunschweig, 47 km SW of Magdeburg; airfield 4 km S of Halberstadt and 3.25 km SW of Harsleben. History: 1927 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). 1932 listed as a secondary airport (Flughafen II). Taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1934, developed as a military airfield and inaugurated as a Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Wartime training station, especially for basic training and glider-towing units, and also a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for Junkers Flugzeugbau. Dimensions: approx. 1300 x 890 meters (1420 x 975 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were thought to be in front of the hangars and there was a small ammunition dump at the NE corner. Infrastructure: had 1 very large hangar on the N boundary, 2 very large, 1 large repair and 1 medium hangar on the S boundary, and 1 medium hangar on the W boundary. Small workshops were at the rear of the hangars on the S boundary and an additional workshop was located in the NW dispersal area. The main group of airfield buildings

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 with barracks, admin offices, stores buildings, etc., was at the NW corner of the airfield. A further barracks complex was off the SW boundary to the rear of the hangars. The Halberstadt-Blankenburg rail line ran 3.25 km N of the airfield. Dispersal: there were 4 areas – Northeast, Southeast, Southwest and Northwest with a total of 22 large open aircraft shelters, with each shelter designed to accommodate 2 fighters or 1 bomber. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 11 Jan 44: airfield bombed by 107 B-17 Fortresses. 22 Feb 44: airfield bombed by 18 B-17s. 11 Apr 44: airfield bombed as a secondary target by 9 B-24 Liberators. 30 May 44: airfield bombed by 107 B-17s. 5 Aug 44: airfield bombed by 70 B-24s. 16 Aug 44: airfield bombed by 51 B-24s. 22 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Bf 109, 3 x Fw 190s, 3 x Me 410s, 3 x He 111s, 2 x Ju 88s, 3 x Do 217s destroyed, plus 2 x Fw 190s, 4 x He 111s, 6 x Ju 88s, 1 x Ju 52 and 3 x unidentified aircraft damaged. German sources give 5 x Bf 110, 1 x Fw 190 and 1 x Ju 86 destroyed, 1 x Bf 110 and 2 Fw 190 severely damaged, and 1 x Bf 110 and 1 x He 111 lightly damaged; flight operations building hit and burned out, 1 munitions storage shed destroyed. Operational Units: II./Luftlandegeschwader 1 (Jul 40 – Jan 43, Apr-Jul 43). School Units: elementary flight school Halberstadt (1935 – Mar 39); Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 52 (1939-41); Schule/FAR 52 (Apr 39 – Aug 40); LKS 3 (Werder/Havel) Kdo. (Mar 43 – May 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Flieger-Ers.Abt. 52 (Nov 38 – Mar 39). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Halberstadt (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 48/III (Sep 43); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/III Magdeburg/East (1944); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 15/III Salzwedel (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Gen.Maj. Wolf Freiherr von Biedermann (1940 - Sep 42). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 20/III (1944-45); Stab and elements of Fallschirmjäger-Ers.-u.Ausb.Rgt. 1 (Jan-Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.649-51 (4 Apr 44 updated to 15 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Halle (GER) (51 29 N – 11 57 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates and not specifically identified with the airfield – not complete): the great majority of the - 261 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 approx. 61 Flak units in the Halle area are listed in documents as Halle-Leuna, the latter being the huge refinery complex 20 km S of Halle and 4.25 km SE of Merseburg. In practice, these units had little to do with Halle and almost everything to do with protecting the Leuna complex so they will not be listed. Halle-Leipzig (GER): see Leipzig-Schkeuditz. Halle-Mötzlich (GER) (a.k.a. Halle-Klemm) (51 31 05 N – 11 59 30 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) in Anhalt 4 km NNE of Halle and just W of the village of Mötzlich. History: built 1934-35 for use by Klemm Flugzeug to manufacture trainers and light communications and liaison aircraft. Taken over by Siebel Flugzeugbau in December 1937 and the manufacturing continued through the war. Dimensions: approx. 825 x 410 meters (900 x 450 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway, but there was a prepared (dirt? gravel?) 275 meter (300 yard) airstrip inside the W boundary. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel was available. Infrastructure: had 1 large and 1 medium hangar with paved aprons off the SE corner, as well as the workshops and assembly buildings of the Siebel factory. A very large housing estate for civilian employees was just S of the Siebel factory complex, a very large hutted camp for forced labor workers and another – Aussenlager Birkhahn – for Buchenwald concentration camp inmates used by Siebel, were both just S and SE of the housing estate. A branch from the HalleMagdeburg rail line served the airfield. Dispersal: there were 3 large and 8 medium open aircraft shelters positioned around the E, SW and NW sides of the landing area. Defenses: had 2 heavy Flak batteries of 6 guns each within 1 to 2 km of the airfield in Sep 43. Remarks: there were several heavy bomber raids on oil industry targets and the marshaling yards at Halle that are not listed below. 12 Apr 44: Halle bombed by B-17 Fortresses. 28 May 44: Halle bombed by B-24 Liberators. 16 Aug 44: airfield bombed by 60 B-17s. Operational Units: none identified. Station Units: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.655-57 (3 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Halle-Nietleben (GER) (51 29 10 N – 11 56 30 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Anhalt 39 km W of Leipzig, 2.5 km W of Halle town center and 1.6 km E of the village of Nietleben. History: 1927 listed as a secondary airport (Flughafen II). Taken over by the Luftwaffe and developed into its main signals training center during 1934-36. Airfield used as a practice field (Arbeitsplatz) by the central Luftnachrichtenschule (signals school) at Halle and, from 1942, as a repair facility for transport aircraft. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 1450 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface subject to unserviceability during heavy rains and spring flooding. No paved runway. A perimeter road encircled the airfield. Fuel and Ammunition: bulk fuel storage was reportedly on the S boundary near the SE corner. Infrastructure: there were 2 large flight hangars and 1 large repair hangar on the NW boundary, all with large paved servicing hardstands in front. A medium hangar was in the SE corner, this probably being used by the base construction office. Behind the hangars off the N boundary were the nearly 200 buildings comprising the signal school, blocks and blocks of barracks, admin buildings, a hospital, motor pool and garages, base services, etc. In terms of buildings, HalleNietleben was the largest or one of the largest air bases in Germany. A branch rail line from Halle served the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: there were several heavy bomber raids on oil industry targets and the marshaling yards at Halle that are not listed below. 12 Apr 44: Halle bombed by B-17 Fortresses. 28 May 44: Halle bombed by B-24 Liberators. 16 Aug 44: airfield bombed by 60 B-17s. 27 Feb 45: strafed by 6 P-51 Mustangs – 2 x C 445s slightly damaged. Operational Units: 3./Schleppgruppe 1 (Nov 44 – Jan 45). School Units: Höherer Kdr.d.Luftnachrichtenschulen (Sep 40? – Aug 44); Stab/Ln.-Schuldivision (Aug 44 – Apr 45); Luftnachrichtenschule Halle/Saale (Aug 35 – Apr 45); Waffenmeisterschule d.Lw. (later Fliegerwaffentechnische Schule 1) (c. 1937 – 41); LKS (Ln) 13 (Sep 44 – Apr 45)? Station Commands: as Fl.H. Halle-Nietleben (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 42/IV (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 40/III (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 21/III (1944-45); Werft-Abt. 103/IV (Feb-Apr 45); Stab I.(FeldfernkabelBau)/Ln.-Rgt. 22 (Mar 45); Ln.-Lehr-u.Versuchs-Abt. (Oct 35 – Sep 37); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 102/IV (H-Wörmlitz – May 43); Lw.Lazarett 9/III (H-Dölau, n.d.); Hauptlohnstelle d.Lw. 2/III (Apr 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.652-54 (22 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Halle-Sennewitz (GER) (51 32 15 N – 11 55 15 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Anhalt 6.5 km NNW of Halle town center, 2.5 km W of Sennewitz and 1.6 km NNE of Lettin. History: laid out in 1939-40? Used as a practice field (Arbeitsplatz) by the central Luftnachrichtenschule (signals school) at Halle and occasionally by transport aircraft. Surface and Dimensions: rough grass surface measuring approx. 1100 x 550 meters (1200 x 600 yards) with an irregular shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: no known hangars, workshops, barracks or other infrastructure. Operational Units: none. Station Commands: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.658 (10 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hambach (GER) (a.k.a. Jülich-Hambach, Niederzier) (50 54 15 N – 06 30 40 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 31 km W of Köln, 26 km NE of Aachen, 5 km SE of Jülich, 5 km E of Hambach and 3.6 km ENE of Niederzier. History: the south end of the airfield was used as a bombing range during the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1465 x 185 meters (1600 x 200 yards) with an elongated shape. Had bad approaches. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.596 (12 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hamburg (GER) (53 33 24 N – 09 59 40 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates – specific airfield, if any, not identified): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/X. Fliegerkorps (Oct 39 – Apr 40); Stab/10. Fliegerdivision (Sep 39); Stab/Luftgaukdo. 3 (Apr-Oct 37); Stab/Luftgaukdo. X (Oct 37 – Jun 38); Stab/Luftgaukdo. XI (H-Blankenese, Mar 40 – Apr 45). Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: Luftverteidigungskdo. 6 (Aug 38 – Jul 39); Stab/3. Flak-Div. (H-Bahrenfeld, Sep 41 – May 45); Stab/VI. Flakkorps (Mar-Apr 45). Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 6 (mot.) (as Flakgruppe HamburgNord) (Oct 36 – Apr 40); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 16(o) (as Flakgruppe Hanburg-Süd) (Apr 41 - 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 51(o) (as Flakgruppe

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Hamburg-Nord) (Jun 42 - 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 60(o) (as Flakgruppe Hamburg-Ost) (May 40 – 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 61(o) (as Flakgruppe Hamburg-Süd) (Sep 39 – Apr 41); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 66(o) (Nov 41 – Apr 42); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 122 (Eisb.) (c.Nov 41 – 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 123(o) (as Flakgruppe Hamburg-Nord) (Apr 40 – Jun 42); Stab/Flakscheinwerfer-Rgt. 161(o) (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Hamburg (Jun 41 - 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 655 (mot.) (Jun-Jul 42). Flak-Abt.: I./Flak-Rgt. 6 (gem. mot.); II./Flak-Rgt. 6 (gem. mot.); I./Flak-Rgt. 21 (gem. mot.); II./Flak-Rgt. 23 (gem. mot.); I./Flak-Rgt. 29 (gem. mot.); le.76 (mot.); schw.137(o); schw.144 (Eisb.); schw.151(o); schw.162(o); gem.165(o); schw.167(v); schw.185(o); schw.225(o); schw.263 (Eisb.); gem.265(v); gem.266(v); schw.267(o); gem.294(v); schw.306(o); gem.341(v); schw.393(o); schw.413(o); gem.414(T); schw.536 (Eisb.); gem.601 (v); schw.602(o); schw.603(v); gem.604(o); schw.605(o); schw.607(o); gem.613(o); schw.634(o); schw.635(o); schw.647(o); le.734(v); le.755(v); le.761(o); le.762(o); le.763(v); le.764(o); le.765(v); le.766(v); le.767(v); le.768(o); le.769(v); le.770(o); le.876(o); le.921(v). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: III./Flak-Rgt. 6 (sw. mot.); 119(o); 150(o); 368(o); 530(o); 583(v); 608(o); 609(o); 610(o); 618(v); Luftsperr-Abt.: 201(o); 205(o); 208(o). Flak-Ers./Flak-Ausb.: Flak-Ers.Rgt. 5; Flak-Ers.Abt. 6. Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 21 (H-Wentdorf, 1941-45); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 53 (1944); Luftschutz-Kp. z.b.V. 1/XI (H-Blankenese, Aug 42 – Apr 45); Sprengkommando d.Lw. 1/XI; Luftschutz-Rgt. z.b.V. 2 (H-Blankenese, Sep 42 – Apr 45). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab/Ln.-Flugmelde-Rgt. 101 (H-Pinneberg, 1943 – Sep 44); Stab IV./Ln.-Flugmelde-Rgt. 101 (HPinneberg, 1943 – Sep 44); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 232 (Sep 44 – May 45); II. (Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 232 (H-Hittfeld, Sep 44 – Apr 45); Stab/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 11 (H-Blankenese, Mar 40 – 1945); I./Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 11 (H-Blankenese, Mar 40 – 1944); IV. (Ausb.Abt.f.Ln.Helferinnen)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 11 (H-Appen, c.194344); Stab V.(Flum.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 11 (1940 – Aug 43); 8. (Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 11 (Mar 41); Lv-Nachr.Abt. 3 (Feb 40 – Sep 41); Lv-Nachr.Abt. 6 (c.Apr 39 – Feb 40); Ln.-Abt. 40 (1939 – Apr 40); Ln.-Abt. 123 (H-Bahrenfeld, Sep 41 – May 45); 2. (Funkh.)/Ln.-Abt. 356 (Jan-Apr 45); Luftgau-Nachr.Abt. 11 (c.Oct 44 – Apr 45); 3./Ln.-RV-Abt. z.b.V. 11 (H-Blankenese, c.Oct 44 – May 45); 2./Ln.-Funkaufklärungs-Abt. Reich (May-Nov 44); Ln.Heimatreparaturbetrieb 5/XI (c.1942-45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Ground Transport (Transportkolonnen): Kfz.Beständebezirk d.Lw. 11/XI (H-Blankenese, Aug 44); Kraftfahr-Ausbildungs-Abt. d.Lw. 8 (HOsdorf, c.1941-44). Medical Services (Sanitätsdienste): Lw.-Lazarett 1/I (HBlankenese, Feb-May 45); Flieger-Untersuchungsstelle 6/XI (1945); Kleine Zahnstation d.Lw. 6/III (Apr 45); Kleine Zahnstation d.Lw. 1/XI (H-Blankenese, Apr 45); Institut für Luftfahrtmedizin Hamburg ( ? – Feb 45). Other (sonstige, verschiedene): Lw.-Leitstelle Nord (Nov 44 – May 45); Lw.-Auskunftsstelle 1/XI (1944-45). Hamburg-Altona (GER): see Altona. Hamburg-Borstel (GER) (53 33 00 N – 09 42 20 E). Dummy 19.5 km W of Hamburg, 13.8 km SE of Stade airfield and 9.3 km W of Finkenwerder airfield. Mock-up included 3 small dummy hangars plus 2 other buildings on the N side of the landing area which was nothing more than a couple od adjoining farm fields. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.613 (1944)] Hamburg-Finkenwerder (GER) (53 32 20 N – 09 50 10 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) and seaplane station (Flughafen (See)) 11.3 km WSW of Hamburg on reclaimed land on what used to be an island in the Elbe River. History: land reclamation and construction began in 1936 but was not completed until late 1939 or early 1940. Used as an Industriehafen by Blohm & Voss for the assembly of BV 138s, BV 141s and BV 222s. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 775 meters (1,100 x 850 yards) that was in the process of being extended in February 1944. Runway: grass surface on dredged sand. The adjacent seaplane anchorage was in a small harbor. Infrastructure: fuel, ammunition and other amenities were available. Had 2 large and 1 medium aircraft assembly hangars at the N end along with a long rectangular workshop building. Barracks and station buildings were off the NE corner and the E boundary. Seaplane facilities in the harbor area consisted of 2 jetties with a slipway between them and a pier. A branch rail line served the airfield and the Blohm & Voss factory yard. Dispersal: 6 large open aircraft shelters and 6 additional parking sites along the perimeter of the landing area. Defenses: unknown but protected by the great Flak belt that surrounded Hamburg. Remarks: repeatedly bombed during the war as part of the area bombing of the greater Hamburg area and as an aircraft industry target. Operational Units: none identified.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Platzkdo. Finkenwerder of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 6/XI (Uetersen) (Apr 44 – 1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.237-40 (22 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hamburg-Fuhlsbüttel (GER) (53 38 00 N – 10 00 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 8.2 km N of Hamburg city center and .8 km W of the suburb of Fuhlsbüttel. History: the former civil airport for Hamburg that was expanded and militarized by the Luftwaffe during 1936-37. Classed as an international airport with a customs office in 1932. In relatively constant use before and during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1610 x 1190 meters (1,760 x 1,300 yards). Runway: grass surface on reclaimed swampland. Infrastructure: fuel, water, ammunition, communications and other amenities were available. Had 2 large hangars, 2 large workshops, a small group of workshop sheds, a motor pool with garages, barracks and admin buildings and offices along the E boundary. Additional barracks were located at the S end of the field. Dispersal: at least 12 open aircraft shelters along the N and E perimeter of the field. Defenses: 1 heavy and 5 light Flak positions in the immediate vicinity of the airfield (12 Aug 43). It was additionally covered by the thick Flak defenses protecting Hamburg. Remarks: repeatedly bombed during the war as part of the area bombing of the greater Hamburg area. 14 Mar 44: reported a total station complement of 98 military, 233 civilian employees of the Wehrmacht, 82 non-Wehrmacht civilian employees, 166 RAD personnel for a total of 579. 3 May 45: Hamburg surrendered to British forces following a (at times) brisk defense than began on 23 April. Operational Units: Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 1/11 (May 39 – Dec 43); 1. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Mar-Apr 40); KGr. z.b.V. 107 (Mar-Apr 40); Wetterkette Nord (Apr 40); Flugbereitschaft Luftgaukdo. XI (1940, 41, 42); III./Fliegerzielgeschwader 1 (Apr/May 44); Fliegerzielgruppe II (H-Sasel, Nov 44); III./NJG 11 (Apr-May 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 2./Erg.JG 2 (Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Hamburg-Fuhlsbüttel (Aug 39 – c.Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 15/XI (Mar 40 -?); Flugstützpunktkommando 1/XI (1941 – Nov 42); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 1/XI (Nov 42 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Hamburg-Fuhlsbüttel of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 6/XI Uetersen (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftzeuggruppe 11 (c. 1939-43); Stab and 2.Kp. Lw.-Bau-Btl. 13/XI ( ? – Sep 42). - 267 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.241-46 (6 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hamburg-Garstedt (GER) (53 40 05 N – 09 56 25 E). Dummy 12 km NNW of Hamburg city center and 6 km NW of HamburgFuhlsbüttel airfield. Mock-up included 2 open aircraft shelters on the edge of woods around the landing area and probably had decoy lighting. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.616 (1944)] Hamburg-Wandsbek (GER) (53 33 55 N – 10 07 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) on the northern outskirts of wartime Hamburg and on the S side of an Autobahn that crosses the city from WSW to ENE. History: used by gliders. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 640 x 550 meters (700 x 600 yards). Operational Units: None. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.589 (6 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hamm (GER) (51 41 29 N – 07 49 03 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 2 km N of Hamm/Ruhr city center. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hammelburg (GER) (50 05 59 N – 09 53 05 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in Bavaria 25 km NW of Schweinfurt. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface on moorland. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hamminkeln (GER) (51 44 35 N – 06 33 50 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) and satellite or dispersal field (Ausweichplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 10 km NNW of Wesel and 2.4 km NW of Hamminkeln village. History: preliminary leveling to make a landing strip began in October 1944 but then stopped due to the arrival of wet winter weather. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 460 meters (1,000 x 500 yards). Runway: grass surface that was soft in wet weather. Infrastructure: fuel, ammunition and other expendables were probably to be brought up if and when needed. No hangars or buildings of any sort. Nearest rail

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 connection in Hamminkeln. Dispersal: no organized dispersals but woods surrounded the landing area. Defenses: none identified (11 Nov 44). Remarks: 26 Oct 44: airfield ordered developed and ready for use in 4 days. 9 Mar 45: airfield ordered evacuated and destroyed immediately. Operational Units: II./JG 2 (May 40). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.247 (18 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hanau-Langendiebach (GER): see Langendiebach. Handorf (GER): see Münster-Handorf. Hangelar (GER): see Bonn-Hangelar. Hannover (GER) (a.k.a. Hanover) (52 22 N – 09 43 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfields, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/Luftgaukdo. 9 (Apr-Sep 36, Apr-Oct 37); Stab/Luftgaukdo. XI (Oct 37 – Mar 40); Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: Luftverteidigungskdo. 8 (Sep 39 – 1940); Stab/Flak-Brig. VIII (Jun 41 – Apr 42); Stab/8. Flak-Brig. (May 44 – Apr 45); Stab/Flak-Brig. XV later 15. Flak-Brig. (H-Burgdorf, Jun 42 – Apr 44). Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 13(o) (1941); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 25 (mot.) (as Flakgruppe Hannover) (c.Jun 41 - 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 56(o) (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Hannover) (c.Jun 42 - 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 122 (Eisb.) (c.1941-42); Stab/Flak-Lehr-Rgt. (as Flakgruppe Hannover (Aug 39 – c. Jun 41). Flak-Abt.: schw.113(o); gem.114(v); schw.165(o); schw.185(o); schw.216(o); schw.232(o); schw.237(v); schw.306(o); schw.461(o); gem.361(v); gem.364(o); schw.418 (Eisb.); I./Flak-Rgt. 501 (gem. mot.); schw.521(o); gem.604(o); schw.695(o); le.770(o); le.772(o); schw.801(o); le.851 (mot.); le.871(o); le.916(o). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: III./Flak-Rgt. 26 (Sw. mot.) (Nov 38 – 1939); III./Flak-Rgt. 51 (Sw. mot.) (1941-43)?; 119(o); 139(o); 149(o); 169(o); 258(o); 368(o); 619(o). Luftsperr-Abt.: 206(o). Flak-Ers./Flak-Ausb.: Flak-Ers.Abt. 6. Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 14 (Oct 42); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 32 (H-Buchholz, 1943/44 – 1945); Sprengkommando d.Lw. 3/XI;

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab, I. and II./LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 11 (H-Bemerode - Jul 38 – Mar 40); 9.(Flum.Res.)/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 11 (Aug 41); 10.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 11 (Jul 43); LV-Nachr.Abt. 2 (Aug 39 – Feb 40); LV-Nachr.Abt. 6 (Feb-Oct 40); Ln.-Abt. 168 (May 44 – Apr 45); 22.(Funkh.)/Ln.-Rgt. 351 (194445)?; Fluko Hannover. Other (sonstige, verschiedene): Lw.-Auskunftsstelle 2/XI (194445); Annahmestelle 2 für Offizieranwärter d.Lw. (1939 – ? ). Hannover-Bemerode (GER) (52 20 34 N – 09 49 21 E) General: satellite airfield (Ausweichflugplatz) in Lower Saxony 7 km SE of Hannover city center. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hannover-Langenhagen (GER) (a.k.a. LangenhagenEvershorst, Evershorst) (52 27 30 N – 09 42 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 8 km NNW of Hannover in Lower Saxony and 2.8 km W of Langenhagen. History: construction began in spring 1935 and it was declared operational on 4 April 1936, although construction work continued for some time after that. The layout followed the “halfmoon” design used for many of the larger airfields built by the Luftwaffe during the 193439 period. Langenhagen was mainly used for the formation and training of bomber units and crews during the war as well as for the resting and refitting of those returning from the front. The FockeWulf aircraft firm set up a production and development branch at Langenhagen in 1943 with the prototypes of the Fw 190D highperformance fighter, the Ta 152 and the high-altitude Ta 154 fighter being three of the aircraft that were developed and test flown there. Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 1100 meters (1,500 x 1,200 yards). Runway: good grass surface. There was an elaborate system of ladder-type servicing tarmacs along with 3 starting platforms, all of which were interconnected, in front of the hangars at the N end of the airfield. A perimeter road enclosed the landing area. Fully equipped for night landings including lighting and a visual Lorenz system. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, communications, ammunition dump, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. Had 9 large and medium hangars along the N boundary, all with concrete aprons. Barrack blocks, station buildings, messes, motor pool and garages, control tower, gym, sports center, etc., were all clustered at the N, NE and E sides of the field. A special branch rail line served the E and N sides. - 270 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: had East, South and West areas with a total of 25 open aircraft shelters. Defenses: there were 5 heavy Flak positions with 6 or 12 guns each and 4 light Flak positions emplaced in Flak towers and on rooftops in the vicinity of the airfield (27 Sep 43). Satellites and Decoys: Hannover-Heitlingen (GER) (32 27 35 N – 09 39 05 E). Dummy 12 km NNW of Hannover city center, 8 km NW of HannoverVahrenwalderheide airfield and 3.25 km WNW of HannoverLangenhagen airfield. Mock-up included a moderate size landing area with 2 dummy hangars in the NE corner. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.616 (1944)] Remarks: 17/18 May 40: bombed for the first time with little damage resulting. 8 Apr 44: bombed by 48 B-24 Liberators. 5 Aug 44: bombed by 143 B-17 Fortresses – 1 x Fw 44 and 8 x Ta 154s from Erprobungskommando Ta 154 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 24 Aug 44: bombed by 72 B-24 Liberators. These two attacks destroyed the majority of the airfield’s infrastructure. 22 Jan 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 3 x Ju 88s destroyed and 1 more damaged. 10 Apr 45: Hannover-Langenhagen airfield taken by elements of U.S. 9th Army. Operational Units: Stab, I./KG 154 (Apr 36 – Mar 37); Stab, I./KG 157 (Apr 37 – Apr 39); Stab, I./KG 27 (May 39 – Jun 40); II./LG 1 (Oct-Nov 39); Stab/LG 1 (Nov-Dec 39); III./KG 27 (Aug-Nov 41); KGr. 100 (Nov-Dec 41); II./KG 27 (Nov 41 – Feb 42); KGr. z.b.V. 5 (Jul 42); KGr. z.b.V. 23 (Jan 43); Erprobungskdo. Ta 154 (Dec 43 – Jul 44); I./SG 5 (Sep-Oct 44); 3./NAGr. 1 (Mar 45). School Units: FFS B 21 (Jun – Sep 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./KG 100 (May – Nov 41); IV./KG 27 (Dec 41 – Aug 42); Erg.Gr./Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (1944). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. C 88/XI (1943 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Hannover-Langenhagen of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 23/XI Wunstorf (1944-45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Obstlt. Fritz Graumnitz ( ? - Oct 39) 9/39; Obstlt. Richard Ossig ( ? - Mar 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Langenhagen (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 12/XI (Apr 41 – Apr 45); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 27 (May 39 – Jun 40); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 27 (May 39 – Jun 40); 3. Res.Flugh.Betr.Kp. Langenhagen; Stamm- 271 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Kp./Flak-Rgt. 7 (1939); 2./le.Flak-Abt. 871 (1943-44); elements of Res..Flak-Abt. 907 (May 41); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 29/XI (1943-45); Stab III.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 202 (c.1943 – Aug 44); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 32/IV (Oct 42); Lw.-Sanitäts-Abt. 12/XI (May 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.255-60 (8 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Hannover-Linden (GER) (52 22 00 N – 09 43 09 E) General: former factory airfield (Industriehafen) 4 km SW of Hannover city center. History: built in 1915 with a grass surface for Hannoversche Waggonfabrik, which built airplanes during World War I, it became Hannover’s civil airport in 1919 and remained so until 1928 when Hannover-Vahrenwalderheide airport replaced it. HannoverLinden was completely closed in 1930. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hannover-Vahrenwalderheide (GER) (a.k.a. HannoverVahrenheide, Hannover – Vahrenwalder Heide, Hannover-Vahrenwald) (52 25 00 N – 09 45 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Lower Saxony 4 km N of Hannover city center. History: dates from 1903 when Karl Jatho allegedly made the first powered flight. Served as an airship school and a Flak searchlight school during World War I. Airport for Hannover during the 1920s and 1930s. In limited use by the Luftwaffe as a paratroop and glider training station by 1935-36. Used mainly by Luftdienst target-towing units during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 1000 meters (1,200 x 1,100 yards). Runway: firm grass on sandy soil. There was a wide tarmac apron in front of the airport terminal building. Perimeter and obstruction lighting for night landings. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, water, ammunition, communications and other amenities were available. Had 2 large, 3 medium and 3 small hangars, all with tarmac aprons. The terminal building and control tower were on the W boundary, a large block of barracks off the NW corner, a small group of barrack huts at the SW corner and other station buildings scattered among the hangars on the N and W sides of the airfield. Nearest rail connection 2.5 km to the WNW. Dispersal: the East and South areas had a total of 16 aircraft blast bays (10 Dec 43). Defenses: 5 heavy Flak positions within 4 km of the airfield, each with either 6 or 12 guns, and 4 light Flak positions that were mostly in Flak towers and on rooftops with at least 22 guns. Nearly half of these

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 positions also protected Hannover-Langenhagen airfield and industrial targets in this area. Remarks: Hannover and vicinity were very heavily bombed during the war and the airfield had been bombed out of existence by April 1945, although it does not seem to have been intentionally targeted by heavy bombers. Operational Units: Luftdienstkdo. 1/11 (1939-40). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Gr./Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (1944). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Hannover-Vahrenwald (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 13/XI(Mar-Apr 40); Flgh.Stüpu.Kdo. 13/XI (1941 – Nov 42); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 11/XI (c.Dec 42 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Hannover-Vahrenwalderheide of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 23/XI Wunstorf (194445). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Maj. Rudolf Boehm (1 Jul 39 ? ). Station Units (on various dates): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.261-63 (17 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Hardisleben (GER) (51 10 07 N – 11 24 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Thuringia 33 km NE of Erfurt and 27 km W of Naumburg. History: listed as operational in Oct 44. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Harsberg (GER) ( ? ) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) either 17 km SW of Kaiserslautern or 23 km E of Heilbronn. History: listed as operational in Jan 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hartenau (GER) (50 20 30 N – 17 59 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) and/or operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Silesia 36.5 km S of Oppeln (Opole) and 9 km ESE of Oberglogau (Glogówek) near the present-day village of Twardawa. History: construction was underway in 1942 but may have been halted before it was completed. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: no information.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.957 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Haustenbeck (GER) (a.k.a. Senne, Senne I and Senne II) (51 51 50 N – 08 47 00 E) General: parking ground for aircraft not in use (Abstellplatz) and airfield distribution field (Abholplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 13 km N of Paderborn, 10.4 km SW of Detmold and 8.8 km N of Lippspringe. History: Used by Luftpark Paderborn for parking and delivering aircraft. For example, 21 Ju 52s were parked there on 27 Dec 44. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 410 meters (1,000 x 450 yards. Runway: grass on rough heath-land. Infrastructure: none. Nearest rail connection at Bad Lippspringe. Dispersal: rough aircraft bays were cut in the woods and in the hedges around the landing ground. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 7 Dec 44: ordered activated for use by Luftwaffenkdo. West. Station Commands: subordinated to Luftpark Paderborn. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.264 (27 Dec 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heidenau (GER) (53 19 08 N – 09 39 41 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 35 km SSW of Hamburg in Lower Saxony. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Heidenau (Aug 39 – c.Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 11/XI (Mar-Apr 40). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heidenau (GER) (a.k.a. Pirna) (50 58 30 N – 13 54 30 E) General: landing ground in Saxony c. 12 km SE of Dresden and 5.5 km WNW of Pirna. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: chronologies; AFHRA, BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heidenheim (GER) (a.k.a. Heidenheim an der Brenz; SteinheimSchäfhalde) (48 41 40 N – 10 06 01 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 33 km NNE of Ulm; airfield 4 km WNW of Heidenheim an der Brenz. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heilbronn (GER) (49 07 48 N – 09 16 25 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 39 km N of Stuttgart; landing ground 3 km E of Heilbronn. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Remarks: 4 Apr 45: Heilbronn taken under attack by U.S. 10th Armored Div. and was finally captured on 12 April. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): gem.Flak-Abt. 253(v) (Aug 39); 4./le.Flak-Abt. 876 (Oct-Nov 44); Heimat-Flak-Battr. 2/VII (1944). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heiligenbeil (GER) (today Mamonovo) (54 28 30 N – 19 58 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in the former East Prussia 49 km SW of Königsberg and 1.5 km NE of Heiligenbeil. History: built 1935-36 and established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Also used as a factory airfield (Industriehafen) by Industriewerk Heiligenbeil. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 1465 meters (1050 x 1600 yards) with an oval shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. A perimeter road ran along the N and W sides of the landing area. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the hangars on the NW boundary. A large ammunition dump was located approx. 1280 meters (1400 yards) NNE of the landing area and connected to it by a taxi track. Infrastructure: there were 2 very large, 3 large and 1 medium hangar plus 1 very large repair hangar off the NW boundary, and 1 very large and 1 medium hangar off the S corner, all with paved hangar aprons. The motor pool, garages and storage sheds were behind the repair hangar. The very large factory complex with upwards of 100 buildings was off the S and SE end of the field and included all sorts of workshops, machine shops, assembly buildings, engine test beds, etc. The Luftwaffe station buildings with barracks, messes, offices, flight control building, etc., were all off the NW boundary. A second group of barracks were located in the factory area. A branch rail line served the factory area and all of the hangars. Dispersal: there were 10 open aircraft shelters off the SE side of the airfield. - 275 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 3 Feb 45: low-level attack – 1 x Ju 52 from I./TG 1 destroyed on the ground. 24-25 Mar 45: Heiligenbeil taken by Soviet forces. Operational Units: III./KG 153 (Apr 36 – Apr 39); Wetterflugstelle Heiligenbeil (c. 1939-45); II., III./KG 3 (May-Oct 39); I./JG 1 (AugSep 39); Stab, III./KG 77 (Jun-Jul 41); III./KG 76 (Aug-Oct 41)?; II./KG 30 (Dec 41); KGr. z.b.V. 800 (Dec 41); Verbindungsstaffel 2 (Dec 41); I./KG 77 (Jan-Feb 42); KGr. z.b.V. 4 (Apr 42); KGr. z.b.V. 5 (Apr-May 42); III./LG 1 (Aug 42); III./KG 6 (Sep 42); I./JG 26 (JanFeb 43); I./JG 54 (Feb-Mar 43); II./KG 77 (Jan-Jul 44); I./KG 53 (JulAug 44); NSGr. 11 (estn.) (Oct 44); 2./NAGr. 4 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); I./SG 3 (Jan-Feb 45); II./JG 54 (Mar 45). School Units: Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 31 (1939-41); Schule/FAR 31 (1939); Schule/FAR 51 then FFS A/B 51 (Jan 40 – Dec 41); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 51 (Elbing) (1942-43). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Flieger-Ers.Abt. 31 (Mar 39); IV./KG 3 (Jul 43 – Aug 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Heiligenbeil (1941-42); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 7/I (mid-1942 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 214/I (Apr 44 – Jan 45); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 6/I (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Lw. Station Units (on the airfield, in the town or nearby on various dates – not complete): Koflug 4/I (Jul 39 – Jun 41); 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 3 (c. May-Aug 39); 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 3 (c. MayAug 39); 7. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 3 (c. May-Aug 39); 8. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 3 (c. May-Aug 39); Werft-Abt. 9/I (Jan 45); le.III/Feldwerftverband 10 (May 41); Werft-Kp. 35 (Mar 41); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 116 (mot.) (Jan 45); I./Flak-Rgt. 2 (gem. mot.) (1945); Flakscheinw.Abt. 260 (1945); 1./schw.Flak-Abt. 275 (1945); Stab/Lw.-Bau-Btl. Heiligenbeil (1939-40); Flieger-Geräteausgabestelle (Eis.) 51/VII (Feb 45); Flieger-Geräteausgabe- und Sammelstelle 3/I (Feb-Mar 45); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 2/XIII (Mar 45); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 116/IV (Jan-Feb 45)?; Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 124/XI (Jan-Feb 45); Traktorenzug 2/XI (Dec 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 285/VI (Jun 41); Flugzeug-Bergungstrupp 9/VI (May 41). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.659-61 (5 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heiligendamm (GER) (not found on current maps) General: airfield in Mecklenburg 22 km NW of Rostock. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: unknown. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 276 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Heiligenhafen (GER) (c. 54 22 09 N – 10 58 55 E) General: airfield in Schleswig-Holstein 56 km E of Kiel. History: listed as still operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: none noted. Remarks: 4 May 45: strafed by RAF Tempests – claimed 4 aircraft destroyed and 12 damaged. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 26 (1939-42); Ausbildungsfliegerführer Ostsee (Apr – May 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Flieger-Ers.Abt. 26 (193839); Flieger-Ausb.Btl. 26 (Apr 39 - ? ). Station Commands: Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 3.Kp. Lw.-Bau-Btl. 8/XI ( ? – Jan 43). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heinsberg (GER) (51 03 25 N – 06 09 05 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in North Rhine – Westphalia near the Dutch-German frontier 52 km WSW of Düsseldorf, 27 km SW of Mönchengladbach and 4 km ESE of Heinsberg village. History: inactive. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring roughly 915 x 115 meters (1000 x 125 yards) that ran parallel to the N bank of the Wurm River. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.589 (12 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heitersheim (GER) (47 52 10 N – 07 38 45 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 21 km SW of Freiburg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Helgoland-Düne (GER) (54 11 10 N – 07 54 50 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) on a sand dune island by the name of Düne 1.2 km E of the island of Helgoland off the west coast of Schleswig-Holstein. History: constructed during 1941-42 and became operational in 1943. Used mainly to refuel and rearm fighters employed in the air defense of the NW German coastal area.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dimensions and Runways: 2 intersecting concrete runways on packed dredged sand in the form of a cross measuring 800 meters and 780 meters respectively. Infrastructure: fuel, water, ammunition, communications and other amenities were available. Had 1 medium hangar, 3 repair sheds, a barrack block, stores sheds and a control tower in front of the barrack block. A light railway connected the airfield to the tiny harbor on the W side of the island. Dispersal: 12 covered aircraft shelters along the runways and connected by concrete taxiways. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: the RAF bombed the naval base on Helgoland and mined the harbor and surrounding waters many times right from the beginning of the war. The USAAF record was more modest. 15 May 43: bombed by B-17 Fortresses, apparently as a target of opportunity – 6 hits on the runway, 13 killed and 31 wounded. 13 Nov 43: bombed by 8 B-24 Liberators as a target of opportunity. 18 Jun 44: bombed by 8 B-24 Liberators as a target of opportunity. 27 Aug 44: bombed by 11 B-17s as a target of opportunity. 18 Apr 45: the heaviest attack - 969 British bombers turned Helgoland Is. and Düne Is. into nothing more than rocks and dust. Operational Units: Jagdstaffel Helgoland (Apr-Oct 43). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 8/XI (c. Nov 42 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Helgoland of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 1/XI Westerland (1944); Flugplatzkdo. Helgoland of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/XI Marx (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Wetternebenstelle Helgoland; Werftkdo. 12/XI (Dec 43); 10.(Flum-Leit)/Ln.-Rgt. 212 (May-Oct 43); 20.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 232 (Sep 44 – Apr 45); Fernflugmeldemesszug z.b.V. 52 (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.265-68 (18 Mar 44 updated to 19 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Helgoland-Südhafen (GER) (54 11 00 N – 07 54 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) for seaplanes (as listed in 1927) on the island of Helgoland off the west coast of Schleswig-Holstein. 1928 reclassified as a commercial seaplane station (Verkehrslandeplatz). Used by Luftwaffe seaplanes during the war but it was never expanded into a permanent seaplane base. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heller (GER) (51 55 07 N – 07 23 53 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 17 km WSW of Münster. History: listed as operational in 1944-45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Surface and Dimensions: unknown, but presumably grass. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Helmshagen (GER) (54 03 00 N – 13 22 00 E). General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania 33 km SE of Stralsund, 4.5 km SSW of Greifswald and 1 km W of the village of Helmshagen. History: used by gliders of the DLV in 1934. No record of any Luftwaffe use during the war. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: none known. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.969 (28 Nov 43); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Helmstedt-Mariental (GER) (52 17 015 N – 10 59 55 E) General: airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Lower Saxony 32.5 km E of Braunschweig; airfield 5 km N of Helmstedt and immediately NE of Marienthal village. History: built between 1937 and 1940 with hangars, administrative and supply buildings and a barrack block. Used mainly as a practive field for training units during the war years, although fighters began using it in 1944. Also used for paratroop training and as a repair center for fighter aircraft. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 685 meters (1300 x 750 yards) with a rectangular layout. Surface and Runway: grass improved with leveling and draining. No paved runway noted in April 1944. A taxiway ran along the N boundary. Believed to have had a beam approach system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: had refueling points along the N boundary in front of the hangars. Location of fuel and ammunition storage not identified. Infrastructure: there were 2 large hangars and 1 medium repair hangar set back 185 meters from the N boundary and all of them had paved aprons. Workshops were located behind the hangars and a motor pool with garages was sited 400 meters N of the hangars. Airfield buildings, stores, barracks, messhalls, flight operations, etc., all grouped in a wooded area immediately behind the hangars at the N end of the field. A branch rail line served the N boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal areas noted in Apr 44. Defenses: No information. Satellites and Decoys: none noted. Remarks: 20 Feb 44: town bombed by 58 B-24 Liberators, but the airfield was not specifically targeted.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Mid-Apr 44: leveling work to build an extension off the E boundary was in progress. 21 May 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-38s – claimed 2 x Bf 109s, 1 x Hs 129 and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 3 x Fw 190s and 2 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 5 Aug 44: airfield bombed by 14 B-17 Fortresses. 12 Apr 45: taken by U.S. forces. Operational Units: KGr.z.b.V. 700 (Feb-Mar 43). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 119 (Jüterbog-Damm) (194041); FFS A 42 (Oct 43 – Jan 45); II./JG 105 (Jan – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 50/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Helmstedt of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 25/XI Gardelegen (194445). Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): 3/Werftzug 759 (Feb 44); 20/Werftzug 170 (Feb 44); 11/Werftzug z.b.V. (Feb 44); Werft-Abt. (o) 30/XI (spring 44 – 1945); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 13/XI (1944); 4.(Tel.Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. 204 (May 43 – c.Feb 44); 4.(Tel.Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. 211 (Sep 44 – 1945); I./Fallschirmjäger-Ers.-u.Ausb.Rgt. 3 (Jan-Mar 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.269-71 (5 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Hengsen (GER) (51 28 50 N – 07 39 05 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 5.7 km ESE of Dortmund and 1.2 km ESE of Hengsen. History: used for glider training. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 320 x 275 meters (350 x 300 yards). Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.587 (19 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Henkenhagen (GER): see Kolberg-Ost. Hennef (GER) (50 47 06 N – 07 16 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 14 km ENE of Bonn and 6 km SE of Siegburg. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hennigsdorf (GER) (c. 52 38 04 N – 13 11 50 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 19 km NNW of Berlin. History: dates from 1935, but in reality this was the east side of Berlin-Schönwalde airfield (see there). Hennweiler (GER) (c. 49 49 45 N – 07 26 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 47 km NNW of Kaiserslautern and 4 km N of the town of Kirn. History: no further development after being laid out for the May-Jun 40 campaign in the West and apparently abandoned after the campaign. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 700 x 520 meters (770 x 570 yards). Infrastructure: little or none. Operational Units: I.(Stuka)/Trägergruppe 186 (Apr-May 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Hennweiler (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 8/XVII (Mar 40 - ?). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.453 (16 Sep 43); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Herbrechtingen (GER) (48 38 00 N – 10 11 00 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 27 km NNE of Ulm and 6 km S of Heidenheim; airfield 3 km NE of the village. History: listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in 1927. No record of use by the Luftwaffe during the war. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.454 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Herford (GER) (c. 52 08 02 N – 08 38 54 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 45.5 km ESE of Osnabrück and 12 km NE of Bielefeld; airfield 2 km NW of the city center. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hermsdorf (GER) (Jerzmanice Zdrój) (51 07 06 N – 15 51 53 E)? General: satellite or dispersal field in Silesia 23 km WSW of Liegnitz (Legnica). History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 5/VIII Brieg (1944). Station Units (on various dates): Werft-Kp. 10 (n.d.). [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Herzberg (GER) (51 38 35 N – 10 23 15 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Lower Saxony 34 km NW of Nordhausen airfield, 30 km SSW of Goslar and 3.65 km ESE of Herzberg village. History: used only by gliders. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 825 x 460 meters (900 x 500 yards). Infrastructure: had 2 small hangar-type buildings in the NE corner. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.589 (6 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Herzhausen (GER) ( ?? ) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in the area bordered by Bonn – Koblenz – Giessen – Marburg/Lahn – not specifically located. History: existed during 1939-40. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: unknown. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Herzogenaurach (GER) (49 34 40 N – 10 54 40 E) General: Fliegerhorst 18.4 km NW of Nürnberg in Bavaria and 1.6 km NE of Herzogenaurach. History: a fully equipped airfield with construction beginning in Sep 1934. Fl.H. A Herzogenaurach became operational on 4 November 1935 with a strength of 350 officers and men. It was mostly used for fighter training before and during the war, by Stuka units in 1942-43, for the re-equipping and conversion training of tactical reconnaissance (Aufklärungs-) units beginning in 1943 and as an operational fighter base in 1944. Dimensions: 685 x 1280 meters (750 x 1,400 yards). Runway: grass surface with two camouflaged concrete starting platforms at the NW and SW corners of the landing area. The field had a beam approach system, perimeter lighting and obstruction lighting. Infrastructure: full services (fuel, ammunition, communications, machin gun registration range, etc.) available. Herzo base had 4 large and 3 medium hangars along the N boundary with workshops and motor pool facilities located behind them. The munitions dump was at the SE corner. The nearest rail connection was in Herzogenaurach. Dispersal: there were two areas, one in woods off the E boundary and the other in woods off the W boundary. The first had 20-plus aircraft bays on hardstands and the second had 12-plus of the same. Addition bays were under construction in the western dispersal area in Nov 44. - 282 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 12 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Ju 52 and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Me 410s, 1 x Ju 87, 4 x Ju 88s and 1 x He 177 damaged. 16 Apr 45: captured intact by U.S. forces, save for one hangar and two wooden barrack buildings which had been destroyed. Operational Units: I./JG 333 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); I./JG 54 (May, SepOct 39); JG 70 (Jul-Sep 39); Stab, I., II./St.G. 3 (Dec 42 – Jun 43); NAGr. 12 (Apr-Nov 43); III./St.G. 3 (May-Jun 43); NAGr. 5 (Sep 43 – Jan 44); NAGr. 8 (Nov 43 – Aug 44); I./JG 5 (Feb-Jun 44); 3./NAGr. 14 (Apr-May 44); 3.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 21 (May-Aug 44); I./JG 300 (Jun-Jul 44); NAGr. 6 (Sep-Dec 44); 1./NAGr. 1 (Oct 44 – Mar 45); Stab/NAGr. 1 (Feb 45). School Units: elements of JG 104 (Mar 43 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 4./Erg.Jagdgruppe Merseburg (Sep-Nov 39). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Herzogenaurach (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 29/VII (Jun 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Maj. Erhard Schmidt? (1 Oct 35 ? ); Maj. Ernst Klenk (1939 - 19 Aug 42); Maj. Karl Heinlein (20 Aug 42 - Nov 42); Obstlt. Oskar Schmoczer (Nov 42 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. (v) 128/XII (1944-45); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 951 (1944-45); Ln.-Betr.Kp./NAGr. 6 (Dec 44); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 10/XIII (Apr 40). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.182-84 (17 Nov 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Hesepe (GER) (52 27 00 N – 07 57 05 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Lower Saxony 22.4 km NW of Osnabrück, 5.6 km NW of Bramsche and 1.6 km NNW of the village of Hesepe. History: construction began in 1938 and was finished a year later. The work was done by local contractors assisted by RAD personnel in battalion-strength. The hangars. admin area and flying control (Flugleitung) were on the NE side of the field while a small repair hangar, repair shops, supply sheds and barracks were on the S side. A railway spur was put in from the station in Hespe to the airfield. Two munitions dumps were built using wood shelters, one to S of the field and one to the W. Hesepe received little use until 1944 and then it became very busy until the end of the war with a variety of different units being based there. Dimensions: approx. 1325 x 1370 meters (1,450 x 1,500 yards).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Surface and Runways: grass with artificial drainage. Had 3 concrete runways in the form of a triangle measuring approx. 1510 meters (1,650 yards), 1465 meters (1,600 yards) and 1370 meters (1,500 yards). Ladder-type servicing tarmacs were laid out in long rows on the N boundary (15 of them), on the SE boundary (12) and the SW boundary (16), all interconnected by a paved perimeter road. All 3 runways were illuminated for night landings and the airfield was equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel, oil, water, ammunition and communications were all available. Infrastructure: building layout as described above. Dispersal: areas existed off the NE, E and S boundaries with a total of 2 covered and 24 open aircraft shelters along with 16 hardstands. Two additional dispersal areas were under construction in Feb 44. Defenses: at least 1 heavy and 7 light Flak positions surrounded the airfield with half of the light Flak emplaced in towers. Remarks: 21 Feb 44: bombed by B-24 Liberators - 1 x Fw 190A from II./JG 1 damaged on the ground and damage to both the airfield and inhabited areas nearby. 24 Feb 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 1 x Bf 110 damaged. 8 Mar 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – 1 x Do 217 from I./KG 2 shot up. The VIII FC report for this attack claimed 7 x Ju 88s destroyed and 2 more damaged, 2 x Bf 110s destroyed and 2 more damaged. 8 Apr 44: bombed by 21 B-17 Fortresses - 5 x Ju 188 A-2s and 1 x Bf 108 from I./KG 2 destroyed or damaged and resulted in the evacuation of base communications facilities to an air raid bunker cut into a ridge near the station. 15 Apr 44: low-level attack – 1 x Ju 188 A-2 from I./KG 2 shot up. Aug-Sep 44: selected as an airfield for jet aircraft, additional blast bays were built along the S boundary of the field and Hesepe was subsequently used by twin-jet Ar 234 bombers. 21 Mar 45: bombed by 165 B-24s followed by 36 B-17s on 24 March – 2 x Me 262s, 3 x Ar 234s and 2 x Bf 109 destroyed, and 4 x Ar 234s damaged; 27 KIA and 44 WIA; these two attacks effectively obliterating the airfield and forcing its evacuation. What little was left was demolished during the night of 3/4 April and British troops took Hesepe on 10 April. Operational Units: III./KG 2 (Sep 41 – Jan 42); I./KG 2 (Jan-Jun 44); III./KG 3 (Jun 44); Stab, I./LG 1 (Sep 44); Kommando Nowotny (SepNov 44); 9./JG 54 (Oct-Dec 44); 6./KG 51 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); III./JG 27 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); 6./KG 76 (Feb-Apr 45). - 284 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Hesepe (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 9/VI (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 84/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Hesepe of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 19/XI Achmer (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 27; Werft-Kdo. (o) 4/XI (1944-45); 1./le.Flak-Abt. 844 (1943-44); 4. and 6./le.Flak-Abt. 922 (1943-44); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 39/XI (1943-44); Flieger-Ers.Btl. VI (1942). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.272-76 (23 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Hessenaue (GER): see Geinsheim. Hessental (GER): see Schwäbisch-Hall. Hessisch-Lichtenau (GER) (51 11 40 N – 09 44 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 22 km SE of Kassel, 22 km W of Eschwege and 1.6 km ESE of the village of Hessisch-Lichtenau. History: built during the 1939-40 period. Used for glider training. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 915 meters (1150 x 1000 yards) and roughly circular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: no details. Infrastructure: there were several workshop-type buildings and sheds off the NW corner. Station HQ, offices and barracks probably off the NW corner. A branch rail line served the buildings area at the NW corner. Dispersal: no organized dispersals seen in Feb 44. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz (gliders) for FFS A/B 119 (KasselRothwesten) (1941-43); glider Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 42 (Helmstedt) (1943-44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Hess.-Lichtenau (Aug 39 – c.Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 9/XII (Mar 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none found. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A, pp.277 (22 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Hettstadt (GER) (49 48 00 N – 09 50 17 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Bavaria 10 km WNW of Würzburg, 12.5 km WNW of Würzburg airfield and 2.5 km N of Hettstadt village on the N side of the Tännig woods. History: hurriedly laid out in summer 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 850 x 295 meters (930 x 320 yards). No paved runway. Infrastructure: there were a few huts and sheds in the woods approx. 1100 meters (1200 yards) W of the landing area.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: aircraft could park along the edge of woods on the N and S sides of the landing area. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.185 (12 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heuberg (GER) (c. 48 10 02 N – 09 05 52 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 71 km WSW of Ulm and 13 km NW of Sigmaringen; airfield along the rail line near the village of Strassberg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): one Zug (3 x 2-cm guns) from 4./le.Flak-Abt. 738 (c.summer 44). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Heuberg (GER): see Oettingen in Bavaria. Hiddensee (GER) (c. 54 35 23 N – 13 08 07 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Schleswig-Holstein 30 km N of Stralsund along the west coast of Rügen and near the village of Grieben. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hilden (GER) (51 11 25 N – 06 53 44 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 12 km SE of Düsseldorf; airfield 3.25 km NW of Hilden. The Rhine River was 4 km to the SW and there were 3 small lakes to the N and S of the landing area. History: built on the site of a dummy flarepath that had been set up in fall 1942, Upgraded and commenced operations as a landing ground in 1944. Believed to have been used as a dispersal field for fighters operating in the Düsseldorf-Köln area. Dimensions: irregular dimensions that provided a take-off/landing run of approx. 1000 meters (1100 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface that was serviceable in September 1944. No paved runway. Infrastructure: no information. The nearest rail connection was in Hilden.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: parking bays were cut into the border of a woods along the W boundary and a clump of trees at the N end of the landing area was also used. Remarks: 9 Mar 45: airfield ordered evacuated and destroyed immediately. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 223/XI (c.Oct 44 – Jan 45); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 11/VI Essen-Mülheim (Jan 45). Station and Town Units (on various dates – not complete): III./FlakRgt. 64 (Sw. mot.) (Nov 38); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 3/XI (1943); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 5/VI (1944-45); Flak-Sondergerätwerkstatt (mot) 3/IV (1943 - ?); Flak-Sammel-u.Instandsetzungsstelle für Funkmessgeräte 1/VI (`1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.278 (Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Hildesheim (GER) (52 10 51 N – 09 56 50 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 28 km SSE of Hannover in Lower Saxony; airfield 3.25 km N of Hildesheim. History: dates from 1926 as a civil landing ground. Taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1933 and developed into an airfield with operations commencing 1 July 1934. Officiall designated a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur in 1935. Hildesheim became the principal Luftwaffe center for all things concerning aerial photography in 1936 and remained so to the end of the war. Additionally, large numbers of combat and training units were based here before and during the war years. From 1939 to 1941, there was a concentration of troopcarrying glider training at Hildesheim and the airborne/air-landing force that invaded Crete in May 1941 was largely assembled here. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 1600 meters (1150 x 1750 yards) with an oval shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface in good condition. No paved runway (Dec 43). Equipped with a flarepath, illumination, a beam approach system and the short version of the visual Lorenz system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: 8 refueling points in front of the hangars at the SW corner. Infrastructure: had a total of 9 hangars – 1 very large at the SW corner, 1 very large at the SE corner, 5 large on the S boundary and 2 large on the N boundary. All 9 had paved aprons and were connected by taxiways. Workshops and an engine-testing bed were just S of the hangars on the S boundary and a motor pool was immediately to the W of those. Station HQ, admin buildings, control tower, stores, barracks and an oval sports ground were all at the S end of the airfield. The nearest rail connection was at Hildesheim. - 287 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: 2 areas – North Dispersal had 30 large and 9 small aircraft shelters plus 2 hardstands, the West Dispersal had just 1 large aircraft shelter (Dec 43). Defenses: had 2 light Flak positions (Dec 43). Satellites and Decoys: Hildesheim-Gestorf (GER) (52 12 05 N – 09 52 50 E). Dummy 17 km WNW of Hildesheim airfield and 2 km SE of the village of Gestorf. Mock-up included 5 dummy hangars and 2 small groups of dummy aircraft shelters off the NE corner. A few aircraft replicas were parked in the hangar area or along the S boundary of the landing area. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.616 (1944)] Remarks: 14 Nov 40: bombed by the RAF - 1 x Ju 52, 1 x Hs 126 and 1 x Fi 156 destroyed on the ground. 2 Nov 39: the glider-assault paratroop unit Sturmabteilung Koch, that was to capture the Belgian fort at Eben Emael on 10 May 1940, began training at Hildesheim airfield. 20 Jun 44: construction was in progress to develop a remote extension to the North Dispersal in a woods 2 km from the N boundary but it is not know if this was ever completed. c.Aug-Sep 44: all aircraft, equipment and technical facilities relocated to a satellite airfield at Wrisbergholzen/12 km S of Hildesheim due to the threat of Allied air attacks. While the city of Hildesheim was bombed a number of times because of its marshalling yards and industrial targets, the airfield ended the war relatively unscathed. Dec 44 – Feb 45: airfield reported consistent difficulties with serviceability. 16 Feb 45: strafed by 8 P-47 Thunderbolts – 1 x Bf 109 destroyed. (German report) 7-8 Apr 45: Hildesheim taken by U.S. forces. Operational Units: 17./KGr.z.b.V 5 (Oct 39 – Jul 40); LuftlandeSturm-Rgt. 1 (Nov 39 – Feb 42); III./St.G. 2 (c. Jan-Feb 40); Stab/LLG 1 (Jul 40 – Jan 43, Apr-Jun 43); I./LLG 1 (Jul 40 – Jun 42, Sep 42 – Jan 43, Apr-May 43); Luftbildstaffel 1 (Apr 41 – Dec 44); Schleppschwarm Afrika (Sep 41); KGr. z.b.V. 400 (Dec 41); 1. (Go)/Lw.-Kdo. Don (Apr-Aug 42); 2., 3., 6., 7., 8., 9., 10. Staffel DFS 230 d.Lw. (Apr-Jul/Aug 42); Stab/Verbindungskdo. (S) 1 (May 42); Stab/Verb.Kdo. (S) 2 (May-Jun 42); Stab/Verb.Kdo. (S) 4 (May 42); Verbindungskdo. (S) V (May-Jun 42); I./KG z.b.V. 1 (Sep-Oct 42, Apr 43); III./LLG 1 (Mar-Apr 43); Stab/KG z.b.V. 1 (Apr 43); 17./LLG 1 (Apr-Jun 43); Stab/TG 1 (May 43); I./TG 1 (May 43); II./ZG 26 (Oct 43 – Feb 44); parts of II./ZG 76 (Feb-Mar 44); II./KG 200 (c. Feb-Jun 44); I./KG 200 (Feb-Apr 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: Aufklärungsschule Hildesheim (Jul 34 – Oct 39); Fliegerbildschule Hildesheim (Oct 35 – Apr 45); II./JG 107 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); 6., 7. and 8./JG 105 (Jan – Mar 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./KG 51 (Aug 43 – Mar 44); Erg.Gr./Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (1944); Erg.St./Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (Nov 44 – 1945); Fallschirm-Panzerjäger-Ausb.-u.Ers.Btl. (1945). Station Commands: Fl.H. Hildesheim (to Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 46/XI (5 Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 26/XI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. (o) 26/XI (spring 44 – 1945); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 200 (Feb 44 - ? ); 4./le.FlakAbt. 770 (1943-44); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 87/XI (1943-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.279-83 (7 Apr 44 updated to 20 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Hildesheim-Himmelsthür (GER) (52 10 30 N – 09 54 15 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) 28 km SSE of Hannover in Lower Saxony; airfield 3 km NW of Hildesheim near the suburban village of Himmelsthür. History: a glider training ground and satellite of Hildesheim airfield. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface, approx. 825 x 685 meters (900 x 750 yards). Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.589 (5 Dec 43); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Himmerod (GER) (c. 50 02 13 N – 06 44 51 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 17 km ENE of Bitburg and 9 km NW of Wittlich. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hirschberg (GER) (a.k.a. Hirschberg-Riesengebirge; today: Jelenia Gora) (50 54 00 N – 15 47 10 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Silesia 91 km WSW of Breslau and 45 km SW of Liegnitz (Legnica); airfield 2 km E of the town of Hirschberg-Riesengebirge. History: a pre-war civil landing ground. used for glider training during the war in conjunction with the Reich glider school at nearby Grunau. Hirschberg surrendered to Soviet forces on 8 May 1945. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 685 x 410 meters (750 x 450 yards). Infrastructure: had 2 small hangars.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: Pz.Aufkl.Schwarm 5 ( (Mar-Apr 45). Station Commands: none identified. Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the landing ground, in the town or nearby on various dates – not complete): Koflug 6/VIII (Jan-Apr 45); elements of le.Feldwerft-Abt. I/70 (Feb-Apr 45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 99 (mot.) (1945); Flak-Instandsetzungs-Abt. 1/VI (1945); Ln.-Betr.Zug z.b.V. 8 (Jan-Apr 45); Flug-Betriebsstoff-Kolonne 518/III (1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.957 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hof (GER) (50 19 00 N – 11 52 22 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Bavaria 115 km NNE of Nürnberg, 47.5 km NNE of Bayreuth, 28 km SW of Plauen; airfield 3 km WNW of the town of Hof. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). 1928 list as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). No records found of wartime use. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface on clay soil measuring approx. 460 x 395 meters (500 x 430 yards) and irregular in shape. Infrastructure: had a small hangar on the W boundary and an admin building on the S boundary. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.958 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hofgeismar (GER) (c. 51 29 19 N – 09 23 42 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Hesse 20 km NNW of Kassel. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hohenaspe (GER) (a.k.a. Hungriger Wolf) (53 59 45 N – 09 34 45 E) General: satellite airfield (Feldflugplatz) in Schleswig-Holstein 57 km NNW of Hamburg and 8 km NE of Itzehoe. History: dates from 1905 when artillery balloon observation units used it followed by some aircraft use during World War I. The land was turned into a manouvre area for the Reichswehr after the war and then as a SA sports field from 1935. The Luftwaffe had a grass runway and a single building constructed 1936-39, but it was not until fall 1939 that barracks and other buildings were finally built and Hohenaspe turned into an airfield of sorts. A replacement battalion (Lw.-Ers.Btl. XI) was formed there in May 1942 but then departed in July. As a wartime satellite of Uetersen airfield, no units were permanently stationed there. Dimensions: no information. Runway: grass surface. Infrastructure: see above – no further details. Dispersal: no

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown, but probably none. Remarks: Feb 45: still listed as operational. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Hohenaspe (Aug 39 – Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 7/XI (Mar 40 - ?). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Lw.-Ers.Btl. XI (May-Jul 42); 7.(Genesenden)/Flieger-Ausb.Rgt. 42 (May 42). Hohenberg (GER) (50 56 50 N – 07 02 10 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine-Westphalia 6 km ENE of Köln city center on a sports ground in the middle of a builtup area 1.6 km NW of Köln-Ostheim airfield. History: sports ground converted for use as an auxiliary landing ground for Ostheim airfield in September 1944. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 137 meters (1000 x 150 yards). Runway: grass surface with no paved runway. Infrastructure: none seen. Dispersal: aircraft were able to park under trees around the perimeter of the landing area. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.284 (16 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Hohenfriedeberg (GER) (a.k.a. Dobromierz) (50 55 30 N – 16 15 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Silesia 33 km S of Liegnitz (Legnica). History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hohn (GER) (54 19 15 N – 09 32 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) under construction 39 km W of Kiel, 23 km S of Schleswig, 9.7 km WNW of Rendsburg and 3.25 km NE of Hohn village in Schleswig-Holstein. History and Runways: the first construction was taken up in 1938-39 with the building of three barrack camps for RAD personnel and Luftwaffe Bau- (construction) units. The initial phase was completed in May 1940 and then Hohn fell into disuse until spring 1944 much like Kaltenkirchen airfield did. In 1944 Russian and other POWs were brought in to undertake further construction including 2 intersecting concrete runways that were never fully completed. In the final months of the war, Hohn was used by night fighters and by jet reconnaissance units flying Me 262s and Ar 234s as well as conventional recce units.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Infrastructure: 3 huts on the S side of the perimeter track and no hangars; 3 groups of barrack huts were located between the airfield and Hohn village and a smaller group in woods 1.6 km SSE of the airfield; a branch of the Husum-Rendsburg rail line entered the airfield from the SE (3 Mar 45). Dispersal: no organized dispersal. Satellites and Decoys: Hohn-Tetenhusen (GER) (54 21 20 N – 09 26 45 E). Dummy 14 km SSW of Schleswig/Land airfield, 7.3 km NW of Hohn airfield and 3.6 km NW of Tetenhusen village. Mock-up included 1 dummy hangar, a long shed and 1 small building along the S boundary with a few decoy aircraft parked near the hangar. An active practice bomb range was located to the WNW. This dummy was intended to be for the never-completed Hohn airfield. . [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.618 (1944)] Remarks: 5 May 45: airfield with 3,000 Luftwaffe occupants and 20 aircraft (mostly Bf 109s) taken by an RAF rifle platoon from 2627 Squadron. Operational Units: 1./NAGr. 6 (Apr 45); Stab, 2./NAGr. 8 (Apr-May 45); 2./NAGr. 3 (Apr-May 45)?; Nahaufkl.St. 11./11 (Apr-May 45)? Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. Hohn of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 4/XI Schleswig-Land (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Wetternebenstelle Hohn (8 May 45); 13/Feldwerftverband 50 (8 May 45); WerftAbt.d.Lw.(o) 27/XI (8 May 45); 24. Flugzeug-Wartungs-Kp. (part) (8 May 45); le.Flak-Zug (8 May 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.285-86 (9 Mar 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; Air Division Intelligence Summary No. 1; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Holm (GER): see Ütersen-Holm (dummy). Holzkirchen (GER) (a.k.a. Holzkirchen-Hoggersdorf) (47 52 50 N – 11 41 30 E) General: satellite airfield or landing ground (Schattenplatz) in Bavaria 29 km S of München (Munich), 1.2 km W of Holzkirchen and 2.8 km WNW of Holzkirchen-Marschall airfield. History: a small civil landing ground before the war. Use by the Luftwaffe unclear as it was a satellite of Holzkirchen-Marschall. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface on undulating meadowland measuring approx. 550 x 320 meters (600 x 350 yards). Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar on the N boundary. Operational Units: as for Holzkirchen-Marschall. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.431 (15 Jul 43); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 292 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Holzkirchen-Marschall (GER) (47 52 15 N – 11 43 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Bavaria 32.5 km SSE of München (Munich); airfield 2.5 km ESE of the village of Holzkirchen. History: believed to have been built during the 1942-43 period. Further developed at the end of 1943 for use as a dispersal field for fighters based in the Munich area. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 1100 meters (1400 x 1200 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were possibly at the NE corner. Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar at the SW corner, and 5 small buildings off the SW corner may have been used as workshops. Accommodations were in 4 small buildings in the center of the S boundary and 1 barrack-type building off the E boundary. Nearest rail connection in Holzkirchen. Dispersal: a taxi track was under construction in April 1944 leading to a small woods off the S boundary. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 31 Jul 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 4 x Fw 190s, 1 x Bf 110, 2 x Me 410s, 1 x Ju 87, 1 x Ju 88 and 6 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x Fw 190 and 11 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 13 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 88s destroyed. Operational Units: part of I./JG 301 (May-Jun 44); II./JG 300 (JulAug 44); Sonderstaffel Einhorn (Sep-Nov 44); III./ital. Jagdgruppe (in formation) (Mar 45); Stab, I./KG 51 (Apr-May 45); IV./JG 53 (Apr 45); Stab/KG(J) 54 (Apr-May 45); Kdo. Olga I./KG 200 (Apr-May 45); NSGr. 2 (May 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 13 (Neubiberg). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 33/VII (c. Apr 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 3/VII Neubiberg (1944-45); Station Units: (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. (v) 134/XII (1944-45); one Zug of 143. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Aug 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 101/VII (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.188 (16 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Holzkirchen-Roggersdorf (GER) (47 52 50 N – 11 41 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 29 km S of Munich, 2.8 km WNW of Holzkirchen-Marschall airfield and 1.2 km W of Holzkirchen village. History: a small pre-war civil landing ground. Inactive in 1944 with the land under cultivation. Surface and

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dimensions: farm land measuring approx. 550 x 320 meters (600 x 350 yards). Infrastructure: had a shed on the N boundary. Operational Units: none. Station Commands: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.447 (13 Aug 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Höperhöfen (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Rotenburg airfield - see there. Hoppstädten (GER) (49 36 45 N – 07 11 10 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Rhineland-Pfalz 44.5 km NW of Kaiserslautern, 44 km ESE of Trier, 4.5 km SSE of the village of Birkenfeld and 1.2 km SW of Hoppstädten. History: built in the late 1930’s and used as an forward field for fighters during the campaign in the West in May 1940. No information on use after that. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1100 x 320 meters (1200 x 350 yards) with an oblong shape. No paved runway, but had a narrow perimeter track. Infrastructure: had 2 small buildings off the ENE corner that may have been used as workshops. A machine gun range was located just off the SE boundary. Personnel were probably billeted in the nearby villages. Nearest rail connection was the Hoppstädten – Saarbrücken line that passed along the N boundary. Operational Units: 4.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Sep 39); 8./JG 53 (Apr-May 40); I./JG 52 (May 40). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.189 (5 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hopsten (GER) (52 20 40 N – 07 32 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 36 km WNW of Osnabrück in North Rhine – Westphalia and 10.5 km NE of Rheine; airfield 5.7 km SW of the village of Hopsten. History: construction began in 1938 and was completed in 1939 and placed in service on 25 Oct 39. From then to early 1944, Hopsten was used only sporadically and for short periods of time by operational units. During that time the station was expanded with the construction of barrack blocks, taxiways and parking areas for aircraft. Air defense fighter units began using Hopsten in late March 1944 followed some time later by a bomber unit equipped with Me 262 jets. Dimensions: a very large airfield of irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass on artificially drained sandy soil. Had 3 concrete runways built in 1938-39 measuring 1,800, 1,000 and 1,000 meters. The main 1,800 meter runway was extended to 3,000 meters during 1943-44. Entire area encircled by a perimeter track.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Equipped for night landings using a visual Lorenz system aligned on the long E/W runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points at the ladder-type servicing hardstands along the N and S runway boundaries and the munitions dump was off the SE corner and was served by a branch railway. Infrastructure: there was 1 large hangar and a number of workshop buildings hidden in a small woods off the N boundary. Station buildings and barracks were along the roadside just W of the hangar and workshops. Dispersal: 2 areas – South dispersal with approx. 12 hardstands and a remote Southeast dispersal built in 1944 with at least 29 hardstands and blast bays that was located 5 km E of the original South dispersal. Defenses: extraordinary antiaircraft defenses from summer 1944 – some 500 Flak guns were positioned around the airfield, according to German sources. In retrospect, this seems like far too many and may have been a typo in the German document for the number “50.” Satellites and Decoys: none noted. Remarks: despite bombings, Hopsten remained serviceable to the end thanks to the quick repair of cratered runways, widely dispersed aircraft parking areas and heavily camouflaged infrastructure. 8 Mar 44: low-level attack – 2 x Fw 190As from I./JG 1 destroyed or damaged. 15 Aug 44: bombed by 10 B-24 Liberators – no information regarding results. 26 Nov 44: low-level attack – 1 x Bf 109G from II./JG 27 destroyed. 21 Mar 45: bombed by 159 B-17 Fortresses and strafed by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – fighters claimed 6 x Fw 190s destroyed. According to the German report, a total of 2 x Me 262s and 3 x Bf 109s were destroyed; Runways 1 and 2 unserviceable, and Runway 3 destroyed; landing area heavily cratered; workshops destroyed; 27 KIA and 15 WIA. (German sources) 24 Mar 45: bombed by 62 B-17s – no aircraft hit, but runways destroyed, taxiways and lighting unserviceable and an emergency take-off/landing strip would take an estimated 4-5 days to build. (German sources) 6 Apr 45: taken by British troops after the retreating Luftwaffe personnel demolished and rendered unusable the runways and infrastructure. Operational Units: I./JG 21 (Nov-Dec 39); III./JG 3 (Apr-May 40); 10./JG 2 (May-Jun 40); I./JG 1 (Mar-Apr 44); Stab, I./KG 51 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); II./KG 51 (Nov-Dec 44); II./JG 27 (Nov 44 – Mar 45); 6./KG 76 (Feb-Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 33 (Quakenbrück) (1941-42).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Hopsten (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 4/VI (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 208/XI (c.Nov 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): E-HafenAusrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 12/VI (Dreierwalde); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 349/VI (Oct 44 - ?); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 51/XI (Oct 44 - ?); FliegerErs.Btl. V (1942). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.287-90 (9 Dec 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Hornberg (GER) (48 44 48 N – 09 51 50 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) and glider school in Baden-Württemberg 15 km ENE of Göppingen. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hörnum (See) (GER) (54 45 30 N – 08 17 30 E) General: seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) on the S tip of Sylt Is. off the W coast of Schleswig-Holstein. History: ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Anchorage: experienced large variations between high and low tides, rough seas and pack ice from December to March. Had 3 jetties, 1 slipway and 1 very large girder crane. Fuel and Ammunition: had refueling points along the waterfront between the slipway and crane; several underground fuel storage sites were said to exist. An ammunition dump served by a branch rail line was located 1.6 km N of the hangars. Infrastructure: had 1 very large hangar, 2 large hangars and 1 large repair hangar. Admin buildings and barracks were NW of the hangars and other offices were in a cluster W of the harbor. Dispersal: 5 open blast-wall shelters were arranged in a row adjacent to the most southerly hangar. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 19/20 Mar 40: night raid by 50 RAF Whitleys and Hampdens – this was the RAF’s first raid on a German land target but results were not determined. 8May 45: upon the surrender of German forces, the airfield had an occupancy of just 2 aircraft, both Do 24s. Operational Units: 2./Küstenfliegergruppe 106 (Jul 37 – Jan 39); Kü.Fl.Gr. 406 (1939-41); 2./Kü.Fl.Gr. 906 (1939-41); Stab, 2./Kü.Fl.Gr. 306 (Sep-Oct 39); 2./Kü.Fl.Gr. 506 (Sep-Oct 39); 2./Kü.Fl.Gr. 606 (Sep-Oct 39); KGr.z.b.V. 108 (Mar-Jun 40).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Flugstützpunktkdo. 106/XI (See) (c.1941 – c.Dec 42); Fl.Pl.Kdo. B 105/XI (See) (c.Dec 42 – May 45). However, referred to in a Luftgaukdo. XI document dated 11 Dec 44 and a OKL document dated 10 Feb 45 as Fl.H.Kdtr. See (A) Hörnum without a number and subordinated directly under Koflug 3/XI (Schleswig). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): elements of le.FlakAbt. 836 (1942-44); 2.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 232 (Sep 44 – May 45); Fernflugmeldemesszug z.b.V. 3 (1943/44 – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.291-92 (22 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; Air Division Intelligence Summary No. 1] Hoya (GER) (52 48 40 N – 09 09 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) that was almost immediately upgraded to an airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Lower Saxony on the west bank of the Weser 37.5 km SSE of Bremen and just E of Hoya village. History: the landing ground was surveyed, prepared and a barracks camp built in 1936. Used briefly by bomber units in late 1939 and then not again until August 1944 when fighter units began operating from Hoya. Dimensions: approx. 1150 x 870 meters (1250 x 950 yards) with an oval shape. Runway: grass surface with no paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel storage was at the SE corner of the buildings and an ammunition storage dump was under construction off the SE corner of the landing area (Oct 43). Infrastructure: station buildings and barracks were in a compact group at the SW corner of the landing area. There were no hangars. A special rail line served the station buildings. Dispersal: none noted (Oct 43). Defenses: none noted (Oct 43). Remarks: 4 Apr 45: bombed by 37 B-17 Fortresses, this being the first and only serious bombing of the airfield. Operational Units: II./KG 28 (Nov-Dec 39); II./KG 54 (Dec 39 – Jan 40); III./JG 4 (Aug 44); I./JG 27 (Aug-Oct 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Hoya (Aug 39 – Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 12/XI (Mar-Apr 40); Flugplatzkdo. Hoya of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 23/XI Wunstorf (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates): none noted. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.293-94 (11 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Huchenfeld (GER) (48 51 25 N – 08 42 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 18 km NW of Malmsheim airfield, 4.5 km S of Pforzheim and immediately E of - 297 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 the village of Huchenfeld. History: pre-war use for glider training and for air displays. Became an alternative landing ground for fighters based in the Stuttgart area. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 775 x 710 meters (850 x 775 yards) and roughly square in shape. Infrastructure: none. Personnel probably billeted in local villages. Nearest rail connection in Pforzheim. Dispersal: available in woods of the NE corner and in scrub land to the S of the landing area. Remarks: 27 Oct 44: Flugplatzkdo. Huchenfeld ordered to obtain additional personnel from Fl.Ers.Btl. VII and ensure that the airfield is ready to begin operations by 2 Nov 44. Operational Units: 2.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 13 (Sep 39); 6./JG 53 (Nov 44 – Mar 45). Station Commands: Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/VII Böblingen (Nov 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.194 (3 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hurlach (GER) (c. 48 07 08 N – 10 48 43 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) 30 km S of Augsburg and 6.5 km SE of Bad Worishofen airfield. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Hustedt (GER) (a.k.a. Celle Hustedt-Waldkater) (52 41 45 N – 10 03 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) 7 km NNE of Celle in Lower Saxony. History: built in 1935 on the site of an existing military exercise ground and used for the next 8 years as a practice field for elementary trainers and a training and dispersal field for transport aircraft. Luftwaffen-Bau-Kp. 8/IV arrived in 1939 and built a barrack camp for 1,000 personnel, an entrance road, a rail spur and unloading ramp, underground fuel storage tanks, Flak positions, ammunition and bomb bunkers, etc. Later in the war, a compound for forced laborers or concentration camp prisoners was build adjacent to the airfield. The airfield became operationally active at the beginning of May 1944 with the arrival of a fighter Gruppe. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 1235 meters (1200 x 1350 yards) and rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: firm grass surface (no paved runway according to Allied sources, but German sources claim it had a concrete runway). Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points at the SE corner with a large ammunition dump off the SW corner. - 298 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Infrastructure: no hangars, but a few huts off the E boundary and at the SE corner were probably used as workshops. A cluster of barrack huts were also at the SE corner. A branch rail line served the S side of the landing area. Dispersal: 2 dispersal areas – North with 20+ aircraft bays, and a remote South dispersal some 1200 meters off the S boundary. Remarks: 1942: a Ju 52 transport Staffel and a Fallsch.Art.Abt. were stationed at the airfield. 1943: airfield occupied by Savoia transports and an Italian guard detachment. 7 Apr 45: airfield evacuated by the Germans and captured by British forces on 13 April. Operational Units: II./JG 11 (May-Jun 44); II./JG 53 (Jul-Aug 44); IV./JG 27 (Aug-Oct 44); Stab, I./JG 26 (Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Hustedt (Aug 39 – c.Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 44/XI (Mar-Apr 40); Flugplatzkdo. Hustedt of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 22/XI Wesendorf (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 1./le.Flak-Abt. 772 (Oct 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.295-97 (12 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Husum (GER) (a.k.a. Husum-Schwesing) (54 30 00 N – 09 04 00 E) General: Fliegerhorst at seaport on west coast of Schleswig-Holstein; airfield 2 km NNE of Husum. History: a small civil airport dating from the 1920’s that was taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1939 and developed into a major airfield. Dimensions: large and in the shape of an inverted “U”. Surface and Runways: grass on artificially drained clay soil. Had 3 paved runways in the form of a triangle: approx. 1150 meters (1260 yards) ENE/WSW, 1143 meters (1250 yards) WNW/ESE and 1143 meters (1250 yards) NNW/SSE. There were ladder-type servicing hardstands at the SW corner and along part of the N bourdary. Equipped for night landings with full illumination for all 3 runways, boundary and obstruction lights, beam approach and the short version of the visual Lorenz system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were at the servicing hardstands and there was a munitions dump S of the SE corner and off the NE corner, both serviced by a light rail spur. Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar with adjoining workshops off the S side of the airfield, and 1 medium repair hangar in the same area. The main group of barracks and other station buildings was at a road

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 intersection 1.6 km S of the airfield. Three smaller clusters of barracks were just off the airfield to the S, SSW and NW. Dispersal: had 4 dispersal areas – North, East, South and Southwest with a total (Mar 44) of 4 large and 19 small covered aircraft shelters, and 38 large and 12 small open aircraft shelters for a grand total of 73. The largest was the North dispersal. Defenses: not stated. Satellites and Decoys: none noted. Remarks: 13 Jun 44: the NNW/SSE runway noted as having been mined in preparation for demolition. 18 Jun 44: bombed by 13 B-24 Liberators – 8 Jul 44: a new dispersal area, Northeast (remote), was under construction 2 km from the NE corner. 4 Aug 44: bombed by 39 B-24s – 10 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Fw 190s and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 13 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 6 x Bf 109s, 3 x Fw 190s, 11 x He 111s, 3 x Ju 88s and 6 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Bf 109s, 6 x Fw 190s, 6 x He 111s, 1 x Ju 88 and 6 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 8May 45: upon the surrender of German forces, the airfield was packed with 186 aircraft, mostly He 162s, Me 163s, Fw 190s, He 111s, Ju 87s and Ju 88s. Airfield Units: Operational Units: II./JG 52 (Sep 40); III./JG 1 (Jan 42 – Mar 43); I./JG 11 (Apr 43 – Feb 44); 10./JG 11 (Jul 43); Stab/JG 11 (Oct 43 – Mar 44); Wekusta 1 OKL (Apr-May 45); I./JG 2 (Jul-Aug 44); NJG 1 (1945); Stab, 1./NAGr. 6 (Apr-May 45); part of NSGr. 1 (Apr-May 45); II./JG 26 (May 45); II./JG 400 (May 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Gr./JG 27 (Sep 41 – Jan 42); Stab and IV./Erg.JG 2 (Mar – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 2/XI (c.1941 – Sep 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 133/XI (Sep 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 3/XI (Apr 44 – May 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt.d.Lw.(v) 110/XI (1944-45); Werftzug 466 (Jan 44); 5./le.Flak-Abt. 876 (194344); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 13/XI (Mar 43); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 45/XI (194345); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 47/XI (1943-45); III.(Funkh.)/Ln.-Rgt. 6 (AugSep 44); 15.(Funkh.)/Ln.-Rgt. 2 (Oct 42, Jun 44); 15.(Funkh.)/Ln.Rgt. 5 (c.Nov 42 – Sep 44); 5.(Funkh.)/Ln.-Rgt. 351 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); Horch-Betriebsstelle W 22/Ln.-Rgt. 2 (Aug 39 – Oct 42); Lw.Bau-Btl. 20/XI (Mar-Apr 40); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 239/XI (May 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 348/XI (May 44, 8 May 45); - 300 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Wetterfunkempfangsstelle 22 Husum; Wetterberatungsstelle Husum (8 May 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.300-04 (11 Mar 44 updated to 8 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; Air Division Intelligence Summary No. 1; web site ww2.dk] Hüttenfelde (GER) (a.k.a. Lobellen/Neusiedel, Sovietsk Neyzidel?) ( ? ) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in the former East Prussia 30 km SE of Tilsit and near Gumbinnen. Not located. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

I Illesheim (GER) (49 28 30 N – 10 23 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 48.5 km W of Nürnberg in Bavaria, 17.5 km NE of Rothenburg/Tauber and immediately S of the village of Illesheim. History: construction began in 1935 and Illesheim was ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Luftpark located there. It was mainly used for refitting and reequipping bomber units during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1650 x 825 meters (1800 x 900 yards) and roughly oval in shape. Surface and Runways: artificially drained grass surface. Had a paved runway, according to German sources, but Allied aerial photos of 11 Sep 44 do not reveal a hard surface runway or one under construction. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, flare path, beam approach system and a visual Lorenz system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were probably in front of the hangars on the N boundary. A very large munitions dump was in a woods 4 km SSE of the landing area and a small ammunitions dump was off the W boundary. Infrastructure: off the N boundary were 3 very large hangars, 1 large hangar and 1 very large repair hangar, all with paved hangar aprons. Some 4.5 km ESE of the landing area were 5 large hangars with paved aprons plus 5 small buildings. Workshops and storage buildings belonging to the Air Park were behind the hangars with the motor pool and garages in the same area. Airfield buildings comprising barracks, messhalls, officers’ quarters and messes were behind the hangars and off the NE corner. The station flight control building was off the N - 301 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 boundary. A branch rail line served the hangars and the Air Park buildings. Dispersal: had a Southeast dispersal and a Southwest dispersal with a total of 1 open aircraft shelter and 15 parking hardstands in Sep 44. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 24 Feb 44: low-level attack – 1 x Bf 110 G-4 shot up and damaged on the ground, 1 KIA. 10 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Me 210s, 1 x He 111, 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 4 x Me 210s damaged. 25 Feb 45: low-level attack by approx. 11 VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Bf 109s and 4 x Fw 190s destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 109s, 2 x Fw 190s and 2 x Ar 96s damaged. According to German reports, just 1 x Ar 96 was destroyed and 1 x Fw 190 damaged. Operational Units: III./KG 355 (Apr 37 – Jun 38); I./JG 143 (Nov-Dec 38); I./ZG 143 (Jan-Apr 39); I./ZG 52 (May-Aug 39); III./KG 2 (MarMay 40); III./KG 76 (Dec 40 – Apr 41); KGr. 606 (Mar-May 41); KGr. 106 (Aug-Nov 41); I./KG 51 (May-Sep 43); Stab/KG 51 (Sep-Dec 43); III./KG 51 (Sep-Dec 43); I./NJG 6 (Mar-Jun 44); III./JG 54 (May-Jun 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS B/FFS C Fürth-Atzenhof (1936-39); Arbeitsplatz for LKS 2 (Berlin-Gatow) Kdo. Oedheim (c. 1941-42); I./ZG 101 (Jul 44 – Mar 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./KG 76 (Dec 40 – Mar 41); IV./KG 51 (Sep 41); Erg.Zerst.Gr. (Mar – Apr 44); Erg.St./ZG 1 (Apr – Jul 44); Erg.St./ZG 26 (Apr – Jul 44); Stab/EKG (J) (Jan – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Illesheim (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 28/VII (Jun 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt., Walter Fricke (1940 - Jun 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftpark Illesheim (later Luftpark 1/XIII) (c. 1938-45); Ln.-Heimatreparaturbetrieb 1/XIII ( ? - 1945); Werft-Abt.(o) 3/XII (1944-45); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 953 (c.Apr 44 – 1945); Flieger-Geräteausgabestelle (Eis.) 51/XIII (Jun 42 - ? ); Traktorenzug d.Lw. 15/VII (1944). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.195-98 (17 Nov 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ilsenburg (GER) (51 52 04 N – 10 40 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Saxony-Anhalt 18.5 km ESE of Goslar. History: no further information or mention of wartime use

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ingolstadt (GER) 48 40 08 N – 11 20 05 E) ? General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 4 km NW of Ingolstadt. History: listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in 1927. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ingolstadt-Manching (GER) (48 43 08 N – 11 31 54 E) General: Fliegerhorst near Ingolstadt 68 km N of Munich in Bavaria; airfield 9 km SE of Ingolstadt near the village of Manching. History: construction began approx. 1935. Dimensions: no information. Surface and Runways: had a single paved runway and a paved taxiway. Fuel and Ammunition: both were available. Infrastructure: there were at least 4 large hangars with workshops on the SE side of the airfield. Had a special branch rail line that served the airfield buildings and had a station behind the hangars. Dispersal: had 2 dispersals on the SE side, Southeast (perimeter) and Southeast (off boundary) with a total of 20 aircraft bays concealed in woods, 3 parking sites in woods and 7 large open aircraft shelters. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 24 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – 2 x Ju 88 C-6s and a Do 17Z from I./NJG 101 destroyed, 1 x Ju 88 A-7 damaged (German sources). VIII Fighter Command claimed 1 x Bf 110, 3 x He 111s, 7 x Ju 88s, 2 x Do 217s and 2 x He 177s destroyed, plus 11 x Ju 88s and 4 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 19 Sep 44: low-level attack – 4 x Ju 88 G-1s destroyed and another damaged, these belonging to I./NJG 101. 23 Feb 45: strafed by P-51s – 2 x Ju 88s destroyed, 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x Fw 190 slightly damaged. (German reports) 8 Apr 45: low-level attack by P-47 Thunderbolts – half of the aircraft belonging to II. and IV./NJG 6 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 11 Apr 45: bombed by 131 B-17 Fortresses – remaining a/c from 4. and 10./NJG 6 destroyed. 16 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 1 x Ju 88 destroyed and another damaged.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 18 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 88s destroyed. Operational Units: I./JG 433 (Nov 38 – Mar 39); Stab, I., II./KG 55 (Oct 39 – Feb 40); II./KG 53 (Feb-Apr 40); I./KG 54 (Jun-Sep 43, Dec 43 – Jan 44); Stab/KG 54 (Oct 43 – Jan 44); III./KG 54 (Oct 43 – Mar 44); II./KG 54 (Dec 43); part of IV./NJG 6 (Sep 44 – Jan 45). School Units: elementary flight school Ingolstadt-Manching (Dec 38 – Mar 39); Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 33 (1939-40); Schule/FAR 33 (Apr – Nov 39); FFS A/B 112 (Oct 40 – Oct 41); I./NJ-Schule 1 (Sep 41 – Jan 42); III./NJ-Schule 1 (Sep 41 – Oct 42); Stab and I./NJG 101 (Apr 43 – Mar 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Zerst.St. 1 (Dec 40 – Mar 41); Erg.St./NJG 1 (Dec 40 – Jan 41); IV.KG 54 (Feb 42); II./SG 151 (Mar – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Ingolstadt (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 12/VII (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 2/VII (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Heinrich Geerkens ( ? May 40?) 9/39; Maj. Bernhard Dunn (May 40 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 2/VII (1944-45); 5./le.Flak-Abt. 738 (1945); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 44 (1943); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 113/VII (1944); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 90/VII (summer 44); Flieger-Untersuchungsstelle 4/VII (1944); Flieger-Ers.Abt. 33 (Dec 38 – Mar 39?). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.199-200 (22 Jul 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Insterburg (GER/RUSS) (a.k.a. Chernyakhovsk) (54 36 40 N – 21 48 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 81 km E of Königsberg in the former East Prussia; airfield 2.5 km SE of Insterburg. History: 1928 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). Taken over by the Luftwaffe in the mid-1930’s, developed into a military airfield and inaugurated as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Heavy wartime use by both operational and school units, served as an aircraft ferrying hub for northern sector of the Eastern Front. Dimensions: take-off and landing runs of at least 915 meters (1000 yards) were available. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Equipped with illumination, a beam approach system and other aids for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: both available. Infrastructure: there were at least 5 flight hangars on the S boundary and 1 repair hangar on the W boundary, all with paved hangar aprons. - 304 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 The main airfield buildings were behind the hangars off the S boundary and included the usual admin offices, barracks, messes, etc. The S boundary was probably served by a branch rail line from Insterburg. Dispersal: none known. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 22 Jan 45: captured by Soviet forces. Operational Units: Aufkl.Gr. 111 (Oct 36 – Sep 37); Stab, 1., 2., 3./Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Oct 37 – Nov 38); I./St.G. 160 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); I./St.G. 1 (May-Oct 39); Stab/KG z.b.V. 2 (Aug 39); I., IV./KG z.b.V. 2 (Aug 39); part of KGr. z.b.V. 106 (Feb-Apr, Jun-Aug 41); part of 2. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (May-Jul 41); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Jun-Jul 41, Nov-Dec 41); Aufkl.St. 3.(F)/Nacht (Jun 41); 3.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 41 (Jun 41)?; III./St.G. 2 (Jun 41); Kurierstaffel 2 (Jun 41)?; Kurierstaffel 9 (Jun 41); Verbindungsstaffel 56 (Jun 41); II./JG 53 (Jul-Aug 41); II./KG 1 (Sep-Oct 41); III./KG 1 (Apr-May 42); IV./NJG 5 (Jan-Jul 43); 5./Gruppe Nord (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (May 43 – 1944); V./NJG 5 (Aug 43 – May 44); Flugzeugschleuse Luftflottenkdo. 1 (1942/43 - 1944); III./SG 2 (Jul-Aug 44); 10.(Pz.)/SG 2 (Aug 44); Stab, III./SG 1 (Aug-Sep 44); I./SG 10 (Aug-Sep 44); Stab, I./SG 4 (Sep-Oct 44); III./JG 51 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); Stab, II./JG 1 (Jan 45). School Units: Stukaschule Insterburg (Nov 39 – Jan 40); Stukaschule 1 (Jan – Oct 40); BFS 7 (Nov 40 – May 41); Arbeitsplatz for BFS 9 (Kaunas) (Apr – Sep 43); Stab and II./NJG 102 (Jun – Aug 44). Station Commands: Fl.H. Insterburg (to 1943); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 1/I (Apr 44 – Feb 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Robert Koerner (1 Jul 39 - 4 Nov 39); Obstlt. Karl Dauselt (12 Mar 41 ? ). Lw. Station Units (on the airfield, in the town or nearby on various dates – not complete): Stab/Jagdfliegerführer Ostpreussen (Oct 43 – c.Aug 44); Koflug 1/I (Jul 39 – 1943); Werft-Abt. 1/I (Dec 44); le.Feldwerft-Abt. I/60 (May-Jun 41); 127. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Jan 45); Werft-Kp. 24 (Mar-Aug 41); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 136 (mot.) (as Flakgruppe Insterburg) (Aug 44 - ? )); schw.Flak-Abt. 117(o) (193940); Flakscheinw.Abt. 585(o) (fall 44); Stab/Hei.Flak-Abt. 22/I (194345); elements of Ln.-Rgt. 10 (Insterburg-Ebenrode, Jun 41); Flugmelde-Res.Kp. 9/I (Nov 41); Lw.-Bau-Btl. Insterburg (1939-40); Lw.-Bau-Stamm-Abt. 3 (Nov 41); Flieger-Geräteausgabestelle (Eisb.) 6 (Jun-Aug 41); Flieger-Geräteausgabestelle (Eisb.) 14 (Jun-Aug 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 295/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 107/XI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 179/XI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 226/XI (Jun 41); Flugzeug-Bergungstrupp 6/III (May 41); Flugzeug-Bergungstrupp 7/III (May 41); Flugzeug-Bergungstrupp 15/VI (May 41). - 305 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.662 (23 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ippesheim (GER) (a.k.a. Kreuznach-Ippesheim) (49 52 30 N – 07 54 40 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 28 km WSW of Mainz and 6 km NE of Bad Kreuznach. History: laid out in Sep 39 and used to the end of the May-Jun 40 campaign in the West, then returned to cultivation. Surface and Dimensions: grassy surface measuring approx. 1000 x 365 meters (1100 x 400 yards). Infrastructure: none known. Aircraft were parked along the NW and NE sides of the field. Operational Units: II./JG 53 (May 40); III./JG 52 (May 40). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.454 (16 Sep 43); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Iven (GER) (53 48 00 N – 13 25 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Brandenburg 18 km WSW of Anklam and 1 km NW of the village of Iven. History: laid out in summer 1944? Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: elements of I./SG 104 (Aug 44 – Feb 45). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: chronologies; AFHRA, BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

J Jade Bay (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Varel airfield - see there. Jena-Rödigen (GER) (50 58 30 N – 11 36 20 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Thuringia 20 km E of Weimar, 5.25 km NNE of Jena and immediately S of the village of Rödigen. The airfield was on a plateau overlooking the valley of the Saale River. History: initially a private airfield, it was taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1936-37 and developed into a Fliegerhorst. Served as a station and practice field for elementary trainers, and as a rest and refit station for transport units during 1943 and 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 870 meters (1400 x 950 yards) and roughly oval in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface in good condition. No paved runways.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Fuel and Ammunition: had bulk fuel storage tanks but location not determined. The ammunition dump was off the N boundary. Infrastructure: there were 2 large, 1 medium and 1 small hangar on the S boundary along with separate workshop buildings, and 1 large hangar at the SW corner. All of the hangars had paved aprons. Taxi tracks connected the hangars on the S boundary. A very long building was under construction off the S boundary and this was thought to be for a motor pool and garages. Also along the S boundary were the flight control building, admin offices, the station HQ, a group of barracks and stores buildings. Another group of barracks was off the SW corner. The nearest rail connection was in Zwätzen, 2 km SSE of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Aircraft were parked along the perimeter. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: Jena was first attacked by a few aircraft in Feb 45 and then heavily bombed in Mar 45, but the target was the Zeiss Optical plant. The airfield was evidently not targeted. Operational Units: Stab/KGr.z.b.V. 9 (Nov 39); III./JG 3 (Mar 40); II./TG 4 (Jul 43); IV./TG 1 (Sep 43); II./TG 1 (Oct 43 – c. Jan 44); I./TG 4 (Jan-Mar 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 51 (Weimar-Nohra) (193940); FFS A/B 122 (Apr 41 – Jul 42); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 33 (Altenburg) (1942-43). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Jena-Rödigen (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. B 23/IV (1943-44); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 33/III (1944-45). Station and City Units (on various dates – not complete): LuftschutzAbt. d.Lw. 15 (Dec 39 – May 40); Kraftfahr-Ausbildungs-Abt. d.Lw. 3 (J-Lichtenhain, c.1941-44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.845-47 (15 Jun 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Jerxheim (GER) (52 05 04 N – 10 53 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Lower Saxony 33.5 km SE of Braunschweig. History: listed as operational Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: probably grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Jesau (GER/RUSS) (a.k.a. today: Jyezau?) (54 33 40 N – 20 36 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 16.8 km SSE of Königsberg in East Prussia and 1.6 km N of the hamlet of Jesau.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 History: construction details are lacking but Jesau became operational on or about 15 March 1937 when JG 131 began forming there. It was heavily used pre-war, during the campaign in Poland and was a major staging field for the advance into the Baltic States and Russia in June 1941. A few months later during the second half of 1941 it became the principal aircraft distribution/redistribution hub for the northern sector of the Eastern Front and center for minor Bf 109 (and later Fw 190) airframe and engine repairs, with major parts brought in by rail from Königsberg. An apprentice school of engineering was set up at Jesau so the students could receive hands-on repair training. In 1943-44, fighters were brought to Jesau to have bomb racks and reconnaissance cameras installed. Dimensions: approx. 1235 x 1280 meters (1,350 x 1,400 yards). Surface and Runways: had one 1,300 meter concrete runway. A paved perimeter road circled the landing area and there was a large “L”-shaped refueling tarmac on the N boundary as well as refueling points on the N and S boundaries. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel, oil, water, ammunition and communications, a compass swing and two machine gun testing ranges were available. Infrastructure: there was one large repair hangar plus 2 large and 2 medium hangars along the N boundary running from W to E. and another large hangar in a woods 600 meters N of the east end of the runway. All 6 hangars had paved aprons. Numerous separate repair shop buildings were sited behind the hangars. Storage buildings for aircraft parts and several motor pool yards and garages were located behind the flying control (Flugleitung) building and the fire station at the center of the N boundary. A munitions dump was behind the repair hangar. The main barracks complex was on the edge of the woods at the NNE end of the field and there was a second cluster of barracks off the NW corner. A rail spur connected the base to the Königsberg-Bartenstein railway line. Dispersal: off the S boundary where numerous very large open aircraft shelters had been built. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: Jan 45: the airfield was overrun the last week of January 1945 by Soviet forces advancing on Königsberg. Operational Units: I./JG 131 (Apr 37 – Oct 38); I./JG 130 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); I./JG 1 (May-Aug 39); I./JG 21 (Jul-Oct 39); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Aug-Oct 39); Stab/KG 2 (Aug-Sep 39); Stab, I., V.(Z)/LG 1 (Aug-Nov 39); Stab, I./KG 28 (Sep-Dec 39); III./KG 26 (Sep 39 – Jan 40); III./KG 28 (Feb-Mar 40); Wekusta 1 Luftflotte 1 (Mar 40 – Jun 41); I./KG 77 (Jun-Aug 41); II./KG 76 (Dec 41 – Jan 42); III./JG 3 - 308 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (Jan-Feb 42); Stab, I., II./JG 52 (Jan-Apr 42); Stab, II./KG 4 (MayJun 42); Flugzeugleitstelle Luftflottenkdo. 1 (1942, 1944); I./JG 51 (Aug-Sep 42); III./JG 77 (Aug-Sep 42); II./JG 51 (Oct-Nov 42); 5./Schl.G. 1 (Oct 42); III./JG 51 (Nov-Dec 42); IV./JG 51 (Feb 43); IV./JG 54 (Jul-Aug 43); Stab, II., III./KG 53 (Jul-Aug 44); 2. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Aug-Oct 44); Stab, I./NJG 5 (Sep 44 – Jan 45); Einsatzkdo./NJG 102 (Sep-Nov 44); 5.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Oct-Dec 44); II./SG 3 (Nov-Dec 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Stukagruppe (Aug – Oct 40); 12./KG 27 (May 43 – Apr 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Jesau (1941). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Otto Stams (15 Oct 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/LuftwaffenLehrdivision (Gut Wickbold, Sep 39); Koflug 2/I (Jul 39 – 1944); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 28 (Sep 39); 3. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 28 (Feb 40); 8. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 28 (Feb 40); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./LG 1; 7. Flugh.Betr.Kp.KG 26 (Sep 39); Werft-Abt. 12/I (Dec 44); schw.FlakAbt. 115 (Eisb.) (1939-40); Lw.-Bau-Btl. Jesau (1939-40); 3.Kp. Lw.Bau-Btl. 20/XI (Dec 41); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 9/VI (Dec 41); Stab Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 2/I (Dec 41)Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 231/XI (Jun 41); Flugzeug-Bergungstrupp 2/III (May 41); Erprobungsstelle Jesau (Zweigstelle/Erprobungsstelle Peenemünde/West) (Sep 43 – Jul 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.663-64 (1 Aug 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Jeseritz (GER) (52 26 07 N – 11 17 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Saxony-Anhalt 41 km NW of Magdeburg and 12 km SW of Gardelegen. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Jever (GER) (53 32 10 N – 07 52 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 15.2 km W of Wilhelmshaven in Lower Saxony; airfield 4 km SSW of Jever. History: construction began in 1935, handed over to the Luftwaffe on 1 May 1936 and officially designated a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Jever received constant use by all sorts of units flying all sorts of aircraft from 1936 to the end of the war, especially air defense fighter units protecting the Wilhelmshaven area. Dimensions: 1,800 x 1,000 meters. Work was under way in May 44 to extend the landing area by 600 meters. - 309 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Surface and Runways: grass surface. Equipped with beam approach system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: full servicing facilities available with ample refueling points at the N and S ends of the field. Ammunition dump off the SW corner. Infrastructure: a large repair hangar and 2 medium hangars were at the NE corner; 1 large, 1 small and 1 medium hangar at the E end of the S boundary. Station HQ, admin buildings, motor pool and probably the flying control building (Flugleitung) off the center of the N boundary. The largest cluster of buildings were mostly hidden in a wooded area at the NE corner and included 3 or 4 blocks of barracks, officers’ quarters, messes, supply buildings and such. A branch rail line entered the airfield from the E. Dispersal: the N and S areas were approximately the same size and had a total of 36 covered aircraft shelters and 3 open shelters. A new remote area along the edge of a woods 1.7 km from the SW corner was under construction in Jul 44. Defenses: in early Jan 44 there were at least 4 heavy Flak positions within 5 km of the of the airfield, each with 4 guns, and 15-20 light Flak guns in 9 positions on or adjacent to the field, half of these being mounted in towers or on rooftops. These antiaircraft defenses certainly increased when the Allies began targeting the Luftwaffe’s airfields later in 1944. Remarks: 9 Jul 42: bombed - a K1 35 assigned to Stabskette/Jafü Deutsche Bucht destroyed on the ground. 26/27 Jul 42: bombed by a small number of RAF Boston and Blenheim intruder aircraft with negligible results. Aside from this single attack, Jever was not significantly bombed during the war and was in relatively good condition when the war ended. 8 May 44: construction work to extend the landing area by some 550 meters noted as being underway. 6 Jul 44: a new Southwest (remote) dispersal noted as being under construction. Airfield Units: Operational Units: Luftdienst-Schleppstaffel Nordsee (Aug 34 – Jun 36); I./JG 136 (Oct 36 – Oct 38); I./St.G. 162 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); 1./KG 25 (Sep 39); I./KG 30 (Sep 39); 10.(Nacht)/ZG 26 (Sep 39); II. (Jagd)/Trägergruppe 186 (Sep-Nov 39); III./LG 1 (Oct-Nov 39); Stab/JG 1 (Nov 39 – May 43); 11.(Nacht)/LG 2 (Dec 39 – Feb 40); 10. (Nacht)/JG 26 (Dec 39 – Feb 40); II./JG 77 (Dec 39 – Mar 40); I./ZG 76 (Dec 39 – Apr 40); 12.(Nacht)/JG 2 (Feb-Apr 40); 11.(Nacht)/JG 2 (May 40); I./JG 51 (Jun 40); II./JG 52 (Aug 40); II./JG 51 (Sep 40); II./ZG 76 (Sep 40 – May 41); 3./JG 54 (Nov 40 – Jan 41, May-Jun - 310 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 41); 6./JG 53 (Jun 41); I./JG 1 (Sep 41 – Mar 43); Einsatzstaffel/JFS 1 (Dec 41 – Feb 42); Sonderkdo. Mausi (1942-43); Stab, II./JG 11 (AprOct 43); Jagdstaffel Helgoland (Oct 43); I./KG 54 (Jan-Jun 44); Seenotgruppe 80 (Aug 44 – ?); Seenotstaffel 80 (Aug 44 - ? ); 5./KG 53 (Oct 44 – Mar 45); IV./NJG 3 (Dec 44 – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. C 13/XI; Flugplatzkdo. Jever of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/XI Marx (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Hptm. Martin Mettig (1 Apr 36 - 30 Sep 36); Maj. Kuno von Rosen, acting (1 Jul 39 ? ); Maj. Kurt Breitkreuz? (1939 - 13 Jul 42) promoted to Obstlt. 12/42; Maj. Ludwig Grosse? (1939 - 1942) promoted to Obstlt 01.04.42; Oberst Karl Volbehr ( ? ? ) 1945. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/9. Fliegerdivision (Feb-Jul 40); Führer der Luft West (Aug 39 – Aug 40); Stab/Führer der Seeluftstreitkräfte (Aug 40 – Mar 41); Stab/Jagdfliegerführer 1 (Deutsche Bucht) (Jan 40 – 1942/43); Stab/Jagdfliegerführer 2 (Jan-Mar 44); Koflug Jever (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 15/XI (Apr 41 – Feb 43); Wetterberatungsstelle A(o) Jever; 44); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 30 (Sep 39); Werft-Kp. d.Lw. 7 (Dec 43 - ?); Werftzug 493 (Feb-Mar 44); Werftzug 495 (Feb-Mar 44); Werftzug 496 (Feb-Mar 44); Werft-Abt.d.Lw.(o) 15/XI (spring 44 – Apr 45); elements of le.Res.Flak-Abt. 872 (Jun-Jul 42); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 52/XI (1943-45); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 28 (Jun 42 – 1943); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 29 (Jun 42); Luftschutz-Zug 144/XI (Feb-Mar 44); Luftpark Jever (1942); 16.(Flum.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 4 (Nov 39); Ln.-Abt. 39 (Mar 41); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Jever; Wachzug d.Lw. 89 (Jul 42 - ? ); Wachzug d.Lw. 90 (Jul 42 - ? ); Wachzug d.Lw. 91 (Jul 42 - ? ). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.305-11 (7 Jan 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Jocksdorf (GER) (a.k.a. Jocksdorf bei Forst) (51 39 30 N – 14 37 20 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Brandenburg 23 km SE of Cottbus, 10 km SSW of Forst and 1.2 km SSE of Jocksdorf bei Forst. History: laid out in 1937-38 and was used mainly for glider training during the war. Listed as still operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 775 x 915 meters (850 x 1000 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: there was a single workshop-type building on the NW boundary together with 1 barrack-type hut. The nearest rail connection was 3.25 km SSW in Gross Kolzig. Dispersal: 7 aircraft bays were cut into the woods off the N corner. Remarks: none. - 311 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.665 (17 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Johannisburg (GER) (today Pisz) (53 38 04 N – 21 47 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in the former East Prussia (today NE Poland) 90 km SW of Suwałki and 105 km NW of Bialystok. History: no information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe after 1941. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: a small custodial detachment (Sep 41). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): elements of Ln.-Rgt. 1 (nearby at Niedersee, Sep 39); Kfz.Werkstatt d.Lw. (6 Sep 41). [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Johannisthal (GER): see Berlin-Johannisthal. Juist/Ost (GER) (53 41 00 N – 07 04 10 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) on the east end of Juist Is. in the East Frisians and 4 km E of the village of Juist. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Station Units (on various dates): elements of le.Res.Flak-Abt. 988 (Jun 42); Fernflugmeldemesszug z.b.V. 4 (1943/44 – 1945). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Juist/West (GER) (53 40 15 N – 06 53 45 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) on the far west end of Juist Is. in the East Frisians and 7 km W of the village of Juist. History: inactive. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface in poor condition measuring approc 640 x 595 meters (700 x 650 yards). Infrastructure: 2 buildings at the NW corner were probably used as hangars. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 7.(Flum.Leit)/Ln.Rgt. 202 (Oct 42 – Aug 44); 22.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 232 (Sep 44 – May 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.592 (29 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA;web site ww2.dk] Jülich-Hambach (GER): see Hambach. Juliusburg (GER) (today: Dobroszyce) (51 16 04 N – 17 19 53 E) General: two field airstrips (Feldflugplatz), Juliusburg/Nord and Juliusburg/Süd, in Silesia 26.5 km NE of Breslau (Wroclaw) and 8 km

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 NNW of Oels (Oleśnica). History: used during the attack on Poland but no evidence found of any used by the Luftwaffe after 1939. Surface and Dimensions: leveled grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: 5.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 13 (Aug-Sep 39); 4.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 23 (Aug-Sep 39); I./JG 77 (Aug-Sep 39). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Junkertroylhof (GER) (54 18 30 N – 19 02 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in the former West Prussia 25 km E of Danzig and 1 km SE of the present-day village of Malayevka. History: first noted in Apr 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: I./JG 51 (Apr 45). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Jürgenfelde (GER/RUSS) (a.k.a. Jurgaitschen, Hasenfeld?) (54 28 45 N – 21 47 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in former East Prussia 18 km S of Insterburg (Chernyakhovsk) and 4 km NNW of the present day village of Novostroyevo. History: developed 1939-40 and was operational during the June 1941 build-up for the attack on the Soviet Union followed by a long period of inactivity until mid-summer 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface with take-off and landing runs of approx. 915 meters (1000 yards). Fuel and Ammunition: available when airfield in use. Infrastructure: unknown but believed to have had at least a few workshop buildings and barrack huts. Remarks: 21-25 Jan 45: overrun by advancing Sobviet forces. Operational Units: Wekusta 1 Luftflotte 1 (Jun-Jul 41); 5. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Jun-Jul 41); II./KG 76 (Jun-Jul 41); Stab/NAGr. 4 (Jul-Sep 44); 4.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 31 (Jul-Sep 44); 1./NAGr. 8 (Jul-Sep 44); III./JG 11 (Aug 44); III./SG 1 (Sep 44); Stab IV.(Pz.), 12., 13./SG 9 (Aug-Oct 44); II./SG 1 (Oct 44); Stab, I., III./JG 52 (OctNov 44); I./JG 1 (Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Jürgenfelde (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 36/I Feb-Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 11/I (Mar-Apr 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 213/I (Jan 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.669 (27 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] - 313 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Justingen (GER) (a.k.a. Jüstingen?) (48 23 04 N – 09 39 48 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 24.5 km W of Ulm and 12.5 km ESE of Münsingen. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Jüterbog-Damm (GER) (51 58 40 N – 13 04 20 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 65 km SSW of Berlin in Brandenburg; airfield located 2 km SSW of Jüterbog. History: built about 1934-35 and established as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Used almost exclusively by single-engine fighters and reconnaissance units from 1935 to the end of the war. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 1000 meters (1150 x 1100 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. A perimeter road encircled the airfield. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstands at the N end and SW corner of the landing area. Bulk fuel storage was probably at the N end. Infrastructure: had 6 large hangars with paved aprons in a row that curved around the N end of the field together with several separate workshop buildings. Servicing hardstands at the N end and SW corner of the landing area. Station buildings and barracks were grouped behind the hangars at the N end. A branch rail line served the W side of the field. Dispersal: at least 20 open aircraft shelters were distributed around the E, S and SW sides of the airfield perimeter. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 18 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 8 x Ju 52s destroyed and another 6 damaged. 29 May 44: low-level attack – 1 x Ju 52 from Flugbereitschaft des Generalluftzeugmeisters destroyed (German sources). VIII Fighter Command claimed 3 x He 111s, 1 x Ju 88, 2 x Ju 52s and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x Ju 88 damaged. 22-23 Apr 45: airfield taken by Soviet 5th Mechanized Corps/1st Ukrainian Front. Captured on the airfield were 144 damaged aircraft, 362 aircraft engines and 3,000 bombs according to Soviet records. Operational Units: II./JG 132 (Oct 35 – Oct 38); 3./Aufkl.Gr. 125 (Apr-Nov 36); Aufkl.Gr. Jüterbog (Nov 36 – Nov 39); III./JG 132 (JulAug 38); III.(Aufkl.)/LG 2 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); I./JG 141 (schwere) (Nov-Dec 38); I./ZG 141 (Jan-Apr 39); I./ZG 1 (May-Aug 39); - 314 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Stab/LG 2 (Jun-Nov 39); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.L. (Sep 39 – Apr 40); Stab/St.G. 1 (Nov-Dec 39); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 10 (May 41)?; III./KG 3 (May 44); Stab, III./JG 300 (Oct-Dec 44); 3./JGr. 10 (Oct-Dec 44); II./JG 77 (Nov-Dec 44); Stab, III./JG 4 (Feb-Apr 45). School Units: Bombenschule Jüterbog (1934 – Apr 35); Kampffliegerschule Jüterbog (May 35 – Jan 36); Kampffliegerlehrgang Jüterbog (Jan – Oct 36); Schule/FAR 23 (Nov 39 – Jul 40); Schule/FAR 52 (Aug 40); FFS A/B 119 (Aug 40 – May 41); Aufkl.Erprobungsstab (May – Oct 42); Aufkl.Lehr- u. Erprobungsstaffel Jüterbog-Damm (May – Oct 42); 1. and 2./Jagdfliegerschulstaffel (May – Oct 42); Artillerieflieger-u.Bordschützenkommando (May – Aug 42); II./Nahaufklärungsschule (eins.) 2 (Oct 42 – Feb 43); Stab and II./Nahaufklärungsgeschwader 102 (Feb 43 – Feb 45); Stab and II./Aufklärungsgeschwader 103 (Feb – Mar 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 2.(H) and 3.(H)/Erg.Aufkl.Gr. Ob.d.H. (Jul 41 – Apr 42); 1., 2. and 3./Erg.Nahaufkl.Gr. (Apr – Oct 42). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Jüterbog-Damm (to c. Sep 43); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 21/III Frankfurt/Oder (1944); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 24/III Jüterbog-Waldlager (1944-45). Kommandant (prior to the establishment of a numbered station command – not complete): Obstlt. Georg Vrbancic (Jan 40 - 1942); Oberst Heinrich Lorenz? (6 Dec 40 - 17 Apr 42); Oberst Friedrich Niehuus (1942 - 1943). Station and Town Units (on various dates – not complete): General d.Aufklärungsflieger (L.In. 1) (1944 – Feb 45); Koluft Pz.AOK 2 (Dec 41 – May 42); Koflug 5/III (Dec 39 – 1942); Werft-Abt. 7/III (194445); Ln.-Kp. (H) (mot) 2 (Jan-May 42); 3.(Sumatra III)/Ln.Flugmelde-Abt. (E) z.b.V. 21 (Feb 45); Lw.-Bau-Gerätezug 5/III (Sep 39); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) Jüterbog-Damm; Sanitätsversuchs- und Lehr-Abt. d.Lw. (c.1939-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.556-58 (19 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Jüterbog-Waldlager (GER) (a.k.a. Jüterbog – Altes Lager) (51 59 45 N – 12 59 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Brandenburg 6 km W of Jüterbog and 3 km S of Jüterbog – Altes Lager. History: built 1934-35 as a training field for reconnaissance, a technical school and as an air park (Luftpark) depot. Dimensions: approx. 1600 x 1415 meters (1750 x 1550 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface with sand surroundings. No paved runway. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, flare path, beam approach system and the shortened form of the visual Lorenz system. - 315 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the hangars on the N and NW sides of the field. Underground bulk storage was reportedly at the N end. A small ammunition dump served by a light railway was off the S boundary. Infrastructure: had 7 very large and 5 large hangars at the N end of the airfield with separate workshop buildings in an adjacent woods along with the central heating plant. A large group of barracks, stores buildings, station HQ, messes, officers’ mess, school classrooms and lecture halls, etc., were N of the hangars. A group of barrack huts was at the SW corner, and a second group of permanent barrack buildings and storage warehouses were 2 km to the E of the airfield with a road and branch rail line connecting them to the landing area. In a woods some 3.25 km to the WNW were 8 large and several smaller buildings that were probably used for storage and likewise connected to the landing area by taxi track. A branch rail line served all four sides of the airfield. Dispersal: an aircraft dispersal was being developed in Apr 44 in a woods to the NW where bays for at least 30 planes had already been built. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: the April and May 1944 strafing attacks on Jüterbog-Damm may also include claims for aircraft at Jüterbog-Waldlager. Operational Units: Flugbereitschaft Jüterbog/Altes-Lager (Oct 40 – Apr 41); Überführungsstelle Jüterbog (1941-42); Überführungsu.Einfliegerkdo. Jüterbog (1942-43); Stab/Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (Apr 43 – 1944/45); I./JG 302 (Nov 43 – May 44); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Jul-Aug 44); 2. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Aug-Sep 44); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 100 (Aug-Dec 44); 3. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); Wekusta 51 (Sep-Oct 44); 2. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 33 (Oct 44 – Feb 45); II./NJG 11 (Nov 44 – Apr 45); Stab, III./JG 300 (Dec 44 – Apr 45); Stab/FAGr. 1 (Jan-Feb 45); I./LG 1 (Mar-Apr 45); San.Flugbereitschaft 2 (Mar 45); Pz.Aufkl.Schwarm 5 (Mar 45); Verbindungsstaffel Luftflotte 6 (Mar-Apr 45); part of II./TG 3 (Apr 45). School Units: Aufklärungsschule 3 (Sep 39 – Sep 40); Höhere Fliegertechnischeschule (1942 – Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Ausb.u.Erg.Gr./Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1 (May 43 – 1944). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Jüterbog-Waldlager (to c. Sep 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 37/III (1943 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 24/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Gen.Maj. Viktor Krocker (Dec 39 ? ); Oberst Heinrich Lorenz (6 Dec 40 - 17 Apr 42); Obstlt. Georg Bernhardt (10 Apr 42 - 31 Dec 42). - 316 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftpark Jüterbog (later Luftpark 2/III) (1938-45); Werft-Abt. 22/III (1944-45); WerftKp. 36/III (n.d.); le.Flak-Bttr.z.b.V. 6512 (May 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.670-71 (28 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

K Kaarst (GER) (a.k.a. Neuss-Kaarst) (51 14 20 N – 06 39 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 11 km W of Düsseldorf and 5.7 km NNW of Neuss. History: no activity reported there from mid-1940 through midSeptember 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface on moorland measuring approx. 500 x 565 meters (550 x 620 yards) with an irregular shape. Infrastructure: had 3 large barrack-type buildings on the N, S and W sides of a concrete square. The building on the S side had a tall tower and several adjoining barrack-type huts. Remarks: Neuss marshaling yards and industrial targets bombed several times during the war but no mention found of attacks on the airfield. 30 Dec 44: 500 men to move to the airfield to make it serviceable in 3 weeks for two Staffeln of day fighters. Operational Units: II./ZG 26 (May 40). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): III.(scheinw.)/FlakRgt. 611 (1942); Luftsperr-Abt. 209(o) (1942-43); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 207/VI ( ? – c.Dec 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.596 (11 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kahla-Grosseutersdorf (GER) (50 47 45 N – 11 35 20 E) General: factory airfield (Industriehafen) and planned operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Thuringia 27 km SE of Weimar, 15 km S of Jena and 2.5 km SW of Kahla. History: in construction beginning 11 April 1944. Site of an underground assembly plant for the Me 262 jet. An inclined hoist was built to lift the aircraft to one and possibly two runways built on a surface plateau above the plant. The work was done by 12,000 to 15,000 forced laborers housed in 21 nearby camps and was still underway when the way ended. An estimated 2,000 laborers died building the plant that by the end of war produced just 17-27 completed Me 262s. Surface and Runways: in late Dec 44, a single runway measuring approx. 1125 x 27 meters (1230 x 30 yards) was under construction - 317 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 on a surface of leveled sandstone running along the Walpersberg ridge. Fuel and Ammunition: stored underground. Infrastructure: 1 very large, 1 large and 3 medium buildings, partly above ground and party below ground, were positioned along the S side of the runway and were probably part of the underground assembly plant. A branch rail line was being built to serve the factory. Dispersal: none. Defenses: none identified. Remarks: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.673-74 (3 Jan 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kahlebirsen (GER) ( ?? ) General: town or operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in NW SchleswigHolstein (Kahlebüll?) - not located. There is no evidence of this being an airfield and no town by the name of Kahlebirsen appears on current maps. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Kahlebirsen (Aug 39 – c.May 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 10/XI (c.May 40). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kaiserslautern (GER) (49 26 00 N – 07 36 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Rhineland-Pfalz 12 km W of Kaiserslautern and adjacent to the village of Ramstein. History: listed as operational in Dec 39. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface on a packed sand foundation. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Festungs-Flak-Rgt. 33 (1938-41); Res.Fest.Flak-Abt. 333(v) (1939-40); Res.Fest.Flakscheinw.Abt. 330(v) (1939-41); Heimat-Flak-Battr. 203/XII (1944); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 37 (1941-44); 9.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 12 (1939-44); 3./LV-Nachr.Abt. 9 (Apr 39 - ? ); Ln.-Flugm.Funk-Kp. z.b.V. 40 (KHohenecken, Sep 44 – 1945). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kallies-Ratheide (GER) (a.k.a. Kalisz-Pomorski) (c. 53 17 N – 15 54 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania 53 km WNW of of Schneidemühl (Pila) in Kreis Dramburg (Drawsko Pomorskie). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kallinchen (GER) (52 12 10 N – 13 33 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Brandenburg 37 SSE of Berlin, 8 km ESE of Zossen and 1.2 km S of the village of Kallinchen. History: its only use was apparently for glider training. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 730 x 1000 meters (800 x 1100 yards) and roughly triangular in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: none observed. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.672 (17 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kaltenkirchen (GER) (53 49 55 N – 09 54 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Schleswig-Holstein 28 km N of Hamburg, 27.5 km SSW of Neumünster and 4 km W of Kaltenkirchen. History: construction ordered on 8 Oct 1935 but did not begin until 1938, and then continued until 1942. At the high point in 1940, there were 1,400 workers busy on the project including a RAD Abteilung and Luftwaffe construction troops. Russian POWs were used on the base until mid-1944 when they were replaced with concentration camp inmates from KZ- Neuengamme. There was very little air activity at Kaltenkirchen until Dec 44. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 1100 meters (1200 x 1200 yards). Surface and Runway: grass surface with one paved runway measuring 1,800 x 85 meters. Fuel and Ammunition: buried fuel tanks off the N boundary and probably on the SE side of the runway. A small ammunition store was in the woods off the N boundary. Infrastructure: sheds in woods off the W boundary. Barracks, stores and admin buildings in 3 separate groupings off W boundary, off the SW corner and off the SE corner. A branch rail line served the SE corner of the airfield. Dispersal: 2 dispersal areas – North with 6 aircraft bays, South (remote) with 2 large covered aircraft shelters and possibly 2 more under construction in Dec 44. Defenses: not noted. Satellites and Decoys: Lentfohrden (GER) (53 52 05 N – 09 51 00 E). Dummy 35 km NNW of Hamburg, 5.7 km NW of Kaltenkirchen and 2.4 km W of Lentfohrden village. Mock-up included a simulated landing area with a dummy hangar along the N boundary. A few decoy aircraft were usually parked in the landing area. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.618 (1944)] Remarks: - 319 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dec 44: the arrival of a fighter group (I./JG 7) equipped with Me 262 jets along with a radar site equipped with Freya and Würzburg sets that was set up just 2 to 3 km NW of the airfield immediately made Kaltenkirchen a target of increased interest. 30 Mar 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Me 262 destroyed and another damaged. 7 Apr 45: bombed by 143 B-17 Fortresses – runway heavily cratered and many buildings destroyed. The craters were filled in by the concentration camp inmates and back in use by late 10 April. 13 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 190, 2 x Ju 88s and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x Fw 190, 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 5 May 45: airfield taken without resistance by British troops. Operational Units: I./JG 7 (Feb-Mar 45); 1./Versuchsverband OKL (Feb – c. Apr 45); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Apr 45); Stab, 1., 2./NAGr. 6 (Apr-May 45); III./KG 76 (Apr-May 45); 6./KG 76 (Apr 45); Sonderkdo. Braunegg (Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Kaltenkirchen (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 14/XI (Mar 40 - ?); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 90/XI (1943 – Mar 44); Platzkdo. Kaltenkirchen of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 6/XI Uetersen (1944-45). Kommandant (not complete): Obstlt. Hans Rose (30 Sep 44 - 4 May 45). Station Units (on various dates): le.Feldwerft-St.. 12/50 (c.Dec 44 – Mar 45); schw.Feldwerft-Abt. z.b.V. 2 (Apr 45); 6./le.Flak-Abt. 755 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); elements of le.Flak-Abt. 916 (1944-45); Lw.-BauBtl. 25/XI (1940-41); Sanitäts-Ausb.Abt. d.Luftgau XI (Dec 40 – Oct 42). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.312-13 (14 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Kamenz (GER) (51 17 35 N – 14 07 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I), upgraded to an airfield (Fliegerhorst) on 1 Oct 39, then a factory airfield (Industriehafen) from early 1942 in Saxony 40 km NE of Dresden, 26 km SSE of Senftenberg and 2 km NE of Kamenz. History: built in the mid-1930’s and used mainly as a practice field for trainers. From spring 1942 became a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for Weser-Flugzeugbau where Ju 87s were assembled and test flown before delivery to the Luftwaffe. Dimensions: approx. 870 x 870 meters (950 x 950 yards) and roughly pear-shaped. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. A perimeter road paralleled the W side of the landing area.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were at the N end of the field and at the SE corner. A small ammunition dump was off the N boundary. Infrastructure: 2 very large assembly hangars and 1 large hangar were on the SSW corner, all fronted with interconnected paved aprons. Separate workshops flanked the branch rail line behind the hangars. A large motor pool, garages and stores buildings were grouped 1.3 km off the SW corner. Numerous barracks, offices, messes, quarters, stores, etc., were behind the hangars. A branch rail line served the building area on the S side of the field and the ammunitions dump off the N side. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 2 Mar 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 6 x He 111s and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 1 x He 111 and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 17 Apr 45: low-level attack by 60-80 U.S. P-51 Mustangs – 19 x Fw 190s from SG 10 destroyed on the ground (German sources). Operational Units: III./LG 1 (Mar 39); part of IV./KG z.b.V. 1 (AugSep 39); Stab/SG 77 (Feb, Apr 45); I./SG 77 (Feb 45); III./SG 2 (FebMar 45); 10.(Pz.)/SG 2 (Feb-Mar 45); 3./NSGr. 4 (Mar 45); III./SG 77 (Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS Dresden-Klotzsche then LKS 1 (1936-45); FFS A/B 117 (Mar – Oct 40); Jagdfliegervorschule 1 (1940 – Nov 42); FFS A/B 1 (Jan-Feb 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St.(Stuka)/VIII. Fliegerkorps (Apr-May 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Kamenz. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 7.(Ers.)/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 3 (Dec 42, Mar 44); gem.Flak-Abt. 254(v) (Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.675-77 (15 Jun 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kämeritz (GER) (51 57 04 N – 11 57 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Saxony-Anhalt 30.5 km SE of Magdeburg and 8 km W of Zerbst. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kamp (Land) (GER) (54 08 45 N – 15 20 00 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Pomerania 97 km NNE of Stettin, 16 km WSW of Kolberg, 10 km NNE of Treptow and 1.2 km NW of the hamlet of Kamp. History: the airfield and seaplane station were built during 1935-37. Wartime use as a practice field for twin-engine trainers. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1145 meters (1100 x 1250 yards) and roughly square in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstand on the N boundary. The ammunition dump was 2.8 km ENE of the landing area adjacent to the seaplane station. Infrastructure: had 1 very large hangar on the N boundary with adjacent buildings that were probably workshops. Station admin buildings and barracks were off the NW corner in or on the edge of some woods. Additional barracks were just E of the landing area. A branch rail line from Treptow served the airfield and seaplane station and terminated at the ammunition dump. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities (Dec 43). Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for twin-engined conversion school Kolberg (Nov 39 – Jan 40), FFS C 6 then FFS B 6 (Jan 40 – Feb 45); 6./JG 103 (Oct 44 – Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 27/III (1943); Platzkdo. of A(o) 3/III Kolberg (Apr 44 - 1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Fliegerführer 6 (Luftflotte 6) (Jan-Feb 45); Flugh.Betr.Kp. Kamp; 1.(Fspr.)/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 25 (Jan 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.678-79 (5 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kamp (See) (GER) (54 09 15 N – 15 21 40 E) General: seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) in Pomerania 14.5 km WSW of Kolberg and 1.6 km NE of Kamp. History: the seaplane station along with the airfield were built during 1935-37. It was very active with operational maritime units until the end of 1939 and then became home to the reserve training and replacement pool for maritime units. Anchorage: ample take-off and landing room was available on both the Baltic and Kamper Lake (Kamper See). Icy conditions were a potential hazard during the winter months. Fuel and Ammunition: had at least one refueling point, and that was along a 365-meter quay that sloped downward facing the Kamper See.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 An ammunition dump was about 1 km E of the station and enclosed by a loop road. Infrastructure: there were 2 concrete slipways, one for the Baltic and the other for Kamper Lake, and these were connected to the hangars by taxiways. The station buildings were on a strip of land that separated the Baltic from Kamper Lake (Kamper See) and included 2 large hangars and 1 large repair hangar, all fronted with concrete aprons. The barracks complex was just W of the hangars. A branch rail line from Treptow served the airfield and seaplane station and terminated at the ammunition dump. Defenses: protected by a single light Flak battery on 30 Sep 43. Remarks: none. Operational Units: Stab/Kü.Fl.Gr. 706 (Oct 37 – Oct 39); LuftdienstTeilkdo 1/68 (Apr 38 – 1942); 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 706 (Nov 38 – 1939); 2./Kü.Fl.Gr. 506 (Aug-Sep 39); 2./Kü.Fl.Gr. 606 (Aug-Sep 39); Stab/Kü.Fl.Gr. 906 (Oct 39); 1./Kü.Fl.Gr. 806 (Oct-Dec 39). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Flieger-Erg.Gr. (See) (Jan 40 – Oct 44). Station Commands: none identified. The station command at Kamp (Land) most likely took care of both the airfield and the seaplane station. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.680 (25 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kampen (GER) (53 52 04 N – 09 55 52 E) General: alternative landing ground or satellite in Schleswig-Holstein 35 km N of Hamburg and 4 km NNW of the town of Kaltenkirchen and 4 km NNE of Kaltenkirchen airfield. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Karlshagen (GER) (a.k.a. Peenemünde, Peenemünde-Karlshagen, Peenemünde-West?) (54 09 35 N – 13 47 05 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 72 km NNE of Neubrandenburg and 27 km ENE of Greifswald on the Baltic coast of Pomerania; airfield located 2.5 km N of the village of Peenemünde at the N end of Usedom Island. History: construction began in August 1936, at peak employed 10,000 workers, and was essentially completed in 1939. The airfield was only a part of a large Luftwaffe research and experimental establishment that developed and tested missiles, rockets and jetpropelled aircraft.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dimensions: approx. 1235 x 960 meters (1350 x 1050 yards) and fan-shaped. Surface and Runways: reclaimed and leveled sea marsh. Had 3 prepared strips (partially paved) as follows – (a) approx. 775 meters (850 yards) unpaved connected to 1325 meters (1450 yards) paved for a total length of 2100 meters (2300 yards) aligned E/W; (b) approx. 1050 meters (1150 yards) unpaved connected to 410 meters (450 yards) paved for a total length of 1465 meters (1600 yards) aligned NW/SE; and (c) a rough and unserviceable strip approx. 1050 meters (1150 yards) unpaved aligned NNE/SSW. Additionally, a concrete runway was under construction off the E boundary in Feb 45 and already measured 730 meters (800 yards) with a WNW/ESE alignment. All of the strips were connected by taxiways with the hangars on the S side of the field. Two small starting platforms were on the S side of the landing area. Fuel and Ammunition: both were available. Infrastructure: there were 2 large and 1 medium flight hangars and 1 large repair hangar along the S boundary, and another large hangartype building was behind these. To the rear of these were separate workshop buildings, some admin offices, storage buildings, station flight control, railway sidings and a motor pool and garages. A large complex of barracks, quarters, messes, etc., was about 2 km SE of the airfield. Near a small harbor to the SW of the landing area was a medium hangar and a group of other buildings that were associated with jet-propelled aircraft, missiles and rockets, including a row of 4 testing sheds in a special enclosure. A system of branch rail tracks served this area as well as a track-like launching apparatus to the N. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities aprt from 3 small aircraft shelters off the W boundary. Defenses: protected by at least 5 heavy Flak positions (6 guns each) and 27 light Flak positions (nearly all mounted in Flak towers) in late Sep 43. Remarks: 17/18 Aug 43: bombed by 596 RAF Bomber Command aircraft – the raid was aimed at the V-2 rocket development complex and at the German settlement for scientists, engineers and technical workers with great damage being done to these targets and 735 killed. The airfield was not hit. 18 Jul 44: bombed by 377 B-17 Fortresses – great destruction wrought and 2,000 killed, but the airfield was not affected. 4 Aug 44: bombed by 221 B-17s – further destruction but the airfield was apparently unscathed.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 7 Oct 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 88s destroyed, plus 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. Operational Units: Sondergruppe/Erprobungs-u.Lehrkdo. 21 (1942); Erprobungskdo. 16 (Apr 42 - Aug 43); Erprobungskdo. Banneick (c. Dec 43 – Jun 44); Lehr-u.Erprobungskdo. V1 (1944-45); Erprobungskdo. Graudenz (c. Jul-Nov 44); Erprobungskdo. 4 (Dec 44 – May 45); 1./MSGr. 1 (Mar-Apr 45); 6./MSGr. 1 (Mar-Apr 45). School Units: 5./KG 101 (Oct 43 – May 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Karlshagen (to c. Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 34/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Karlshagen of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 9/XI Neubrandenburg (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Versuchs- und Erprobungsstelle d.Lw. Peenemünde-West (Apr 38 – Mar 45); FlakRaketenerprobungskdo. (Oct 42 – Feb 45); Flak-Versuchsstelle d.Lw. Karlshagen (Jan 43 – Mar/Apr 45); Lehr-u.Erprobungskdo. Wachtel (Jul-Aug 43); Flak-Lehr-u.Versuchs-Abt. 700 (c.Jul 44 – Mar 45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 155 (W) (Aug 43); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 18/III (1944-45); 14./Ln.-Versuchs-Rgt. (1943-44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 308/XI (1944)? [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.787-88 (1 Mar 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Karlsruhe (GER) (49 00 33 N – 08 22 47 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/5. Jagddivision (Karlsruhe-Durlach, Sep-Nov 44); Koflug 3/VII (Jul 40 – Apr 42). Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 35 (mot.) (as Flakgruppe Karlsruhe) (Jan-Jun 42); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 68(o) (as Flakgruppe Karlsruhe) (Jun 42 – 1945). Flak-Abt.: s.234(o); s.241(o); s.357(o); s.424 (Eisb.); s.429 (Eisb.); s.436(o); s.444 (Eisb.); s.458(o); s.460(o); s.506(o); s.538 (Eisb.); s.543 (Eisb.); le.691(v); s.705(o); le.721(o); le.767(v); le.825 (Eisb.); le.876(o); le.932(v); le.942(o); le.987(o). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: III./Flak-Rgt. 9 (Sw. mot.); III./Flak-Rgt. 36 (Sw. mot.); 400(o); 583(v). Luftsperr-Abt.: 107(o); 203(o); 962(o). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab I.(Ln.Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 57 (Oct 44). Karlsruhe (GER) (49 01 24 N – 08 22 37 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Baden-Württemberg 3 km NW of the city center. History: 1927 civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz). 1932 secondary airport with a customs office (customs Flughafen II). - 325 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Wartime Industriehafen used by firm Badisch-Pfälzischen to operate aircraft repair workshops. Dimensions: approx. 1465 x 915 (1600 x 1000 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass on sandy sub-soil with drainage problems during wet weather. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: no information. Infrastructure: had 2 large and 1 medium hangar along the E boundary with adjacent workshops. One of the large hangars was destroyed in a 1942 bombing and was being rebuilt in Mar 43. There were 4 small huts at the SE corner and 2 new small buildings on the E boundary. A light rail system served the S boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: protected by Karlsruhe Flak forces. Remarks: the marshaling yard and oil storage facilities at Karlsruhe were heavily bombed but the airfield does not appear to have been intentionally targeted. 4-5 Apr 45: Karlsruhe taken by French troops. Operational Units: II./JG 52 (Jun 40). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 215/XII GrossSachsenheim (c.Nov/Dec 44 – Feb 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.205-10 (10 Jan 44 updated to 24 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Karlsruhe-Durlach (GER) (49 00 00 N – 08 29 00) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 7.5–8 km E of Karlsruhe city center. History: very little information – appears in an 18-page German listing of all operational airfields as of Jan 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Karthause (GER): see Koblenz-Karthause. Kassel (GER) (51 19 N – 09 28 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates): Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/Flak-Rgt. 103 (as Flakgruppe Kurhessen) (Jun 42 – 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 181 (as Flakgruppe Kassel) (c.Oct 40 – Jun 42); 2./Luftsperr-Abt. 101(o) (Mar-May 44); 6./Luftsperr-Abt. 106(o) (May-Sep 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 112(o) (1943 – May 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 146(o) (Dec 43 - 1945); gem.Flak-Abt. 153(v) (JanFeb 41); 6./Luftsperr-Abt. 209(o) (1943-45); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 232(o) (Nov 44 – 1945); Flakscheinw.Abt. 328(o) (1943 – Jul 44); gem.Flak-

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Abt. 341(v) (1939-40); schw.Flak-Abt. 351(o) (1943 – Mar 44); Flakscheinw.Abt. 367(o) (Apr 43 – Jul 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 392(o) (1942-45); schw.Flak-Abt. 393(o) (1943-45); 5./schw.Flak-Abt. 394(o) (Mar-Jul 44); Stab, 1., 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 413(o) (Nov 44 – 1945); 6./schw.Flak-Abt. 462(o) (Mar-Jul 44); 2./schw.Flak-Abt. 463(o) (Mar-Jul 44); 3., 4./schw.Flak-Abt. 474(o) (Mar-Jul 44); part of schw.Flak-Abt. 535 (Eisb.) (Oct 44); schw.Flak-Abt. 635(o) (1943-45); gem.Flak-Abt. 683(v) (May 42); 5./le.Flak-Abt. 718(o) (May-Aug 44); 7., 8./le.Flak-Abt. 826(o) (May 44 – 1945); 8./le.Flak-Abt. 883(o) (May-Jul 44); le.Flak-Abt. 933(o) (mid-1943 – 1945); 8./le.Flak-Abt. 941(o) (1943 – Sep 44); le.Flak-Abt. 986(o) (? – 1945); Flak-Ers.Abt. 64 (Kassel-Wolfsanger, 1939-45). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 26 (c.1943-44); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 29 (1945); Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): 13.(Flum.Res.)/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 12 (1939 - ? ). Kassel-Rothwesten (GER) (51 23 30 N – 09 32 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 8 km NNE of Kassel in Hesse and 1.6 km E of Rothwesten. History: built 1934-35 in a pine forest overlooking the picturesque Fulda Valley and was often described as Germany’s most beautiful Luftwaffe base. It was also one of the few capable of supporting and servicing two full bomber Gruppen at the same time. Officially designated a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Home mainly to long-range reconnaissance units to 1940 and then became a training base to 1943. From fall 1943 to the end of the war, it was used mostly by night fighter units. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 915 meters (1,200 x 1,000 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface with paved hangar aprons and taxiway. Equipped with flarepath, perimeter and obstruction lighting, and a visual Lorenz system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: full servicing facilities were available. Infrastructure: had 6 hangars and workshops along the NE and E boundary, motor pool with garages, flying control building (Flugleitung), offices and a stores building. The station HQ, barrack blocks, messes, officers’ quarters, dispensary, base swimming pool and other buildings were all in a wooded area immediately behind the hangar line. There was also a base housing area for families with c.39 homes off the S boundary of the field. Dispersal: 5 dispersal areas with a total of 33 open aircraft shelters and bays in mid-1944. Defenses: on 1 Sep 43, had 2 heavy Flak positions off the S and SE end of the field and 2 light Flak positions on the N and NE end. Remarks: - 327 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 27 Sep 44: low-level attack by RAF Mosquitos – 3 x Ju 88s from I./NJG 2 destroyed or damaged on the ground. Jan 45: airfield reported to be consistently unserviceable throughout January. 4 Apr 45: Kassel surrendered to U.S. 80th Div. and the airfield occupied on 6 April. Operational Units: 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 124 (Apr 35 – Sep 37); 2. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 124 (Apr 36 – Sep 37); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 124 (Apr 36 – Sep 37); Stab, 1./Aufkl.Gr. 424 (Apr 36 – Sep 37); ; Stab, 1.(F), 2. (F), 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 24 (Oct 37 – Oct 38); Stab, 1.(F), 2.(F), 3. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 25 (Oct 37 – Oct 38); Stab, 1.(F), 2.(F), 3.(F), 4. (H)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); Stab/KG 28 (Nov 39 – Jun 40); II./KG 28 (Feb-Jun 40); II./KG 76 (Feb-May 40); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 33 (Jan-May 41); Stab/JG z.b.V. (Apr-May 44); I./JG 4 (Aug 44); I./NJG 2 (Aug-Nov 44); III./NJG 4 (Nov 44 – Jan 45). School Units: FFS A/B 119 (Jun 41 – Jun 43). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Kassel-Rothwesten (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 1/VI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Maj. Rudolf Meister (1 Jul 36 - 28 Feb 37); Obstlt. Rudolf Boehm (Jun 41 ? ); Obstlt. Fritz Gewert (18 Mar 42 - 12 Feb 43); Oberst Albert von Malortie (15 Mar 43 - c. Jun 43); Obstlt., Karl Bärenfänger (c. Jun 43 - Sep 43). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug 1/VI (Feb 43 – Apr 45); 142. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (c.Jan-Mar 45); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 986 (Feb 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.83-87 (16 Mar 44 updated); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Kassel-Waldau (GER) (51 17 00 N – 09 30 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 4.4 km S of Kassel and 1.2 km SW of Waldau. History: Kassel’s civil airport for many years before the war. In the mid-1930s, Fieseler established buildings on the W side while continuing to share the field with Lufthansa. Classified by the Luftwaffe as a factory airfield ( Industriehafen) of the Fieseler aircraft firm where different types of planes were assembled and tested during the war, including the Bf 109 and Fw 190 fighters. But more importantly, Fieseler developed and began producing the V 1 (Fi 103) flying bomb here in 1942. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 915 meters (1,200 x 1,000 yards).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Runway: grass surface in excellent condition. An 1,100 meter runway may have been built later in the war. Had an extensive network of concrete taxiways. Infrastructure: full services were available (fuel, water, ammunition, communications, etc.). The Fieseler factory assembly buildings and hangars were located along the W and NW boundaries. The main part of the factory was 1.6 km E of the airfield and connected to it by a straight paved road. A few buildings on the N side of the field were probably used for storage. Nearest rail connection at Niederzwehren 2.4 km NW of the airfield. Dispersal: at least 28 large and medium open aircraft shelters along the W and N boundaries, all of them covered with camouflaged netting. Defenses: covered by the Kassel city Flak defenses. There were 6 heavy Flak positions of 4 to 8 guns each within 3.6 km of the field and 11 light Flak positions on the N, NE and E side, some mounted in Flak towers. Satellites and Decoys: Kassel-Crumbach (GER) (51 16 00 N – 09 31 44 E). Dummy 6 km SSE of Kassel city center and 2 km SE of Kassel-Waldau factory airfield. Served as a decoy for Kassel-Waldau. Mock-up included a landing area of some 550 x 275 meters with 3 assembly shops, power plant and roads all carefully designed to accurately replicate the real buildings and layout at Kassel-Waldau. A very clever reproduction. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.605 (1944)] Remarks: 28 Jul 43: Fieseler plant bombed by 58 B-17 Fortresses – most of the bombs missed the factory and fell on residential areas. 30 Jul 43: Fieseler plant bombed by 40 B-17s. 22/23 Oct 43: Kassel area bombed by 569 RAF Lancasters and Halifaxes – city burned out by a firestorm and the Fieseler plants seriously damaged and temporarily put out of operation. 19 Apr 44: Fieseler plant bombed by 107 B-17s with significant damage. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 119 (Kassel-Rothwesten) (1941-43). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 1/VI KasselRothwesten (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.88-92 (4 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kastellaun (GER) (50 04 40 N – 07 27 00 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in RhinelandPfalz 36 km SSW of Koblenz; airfield 1.2 km ENE of Kastellaun village. History: listed as a Leithorst (main airfield) in Dec 39, probably because of the presence of the Kommando Flughafenbereich (Koflug) in the town. Possibly used for glider training during the war years. By Jan 45, there were two landing grounds listed for Kastellaun – Kastellaun/Nord and Kastellaun-Bell. Nord was the old field that had been in existence since before the war, while Bell was an auxiliary strip adjacent to the village of Bell, 2.5 km SW of Kastellaun. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 595 x 550 meters (650 x 600 yards). Infrastructure: a small hangar and shed were off the SW boundary. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Kastellaun (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 31/XII (Mar 40). Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Koflug Kastellaun (Jul 39 - Apr 40); Lw.-Bau-Rgt. Kastellaun (1940); Kfz.Werkstattzug d.Lw. 101/XII (Dec 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.591 (19 Nov 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Katharinenhof (GER) (c. 54 26 04 N – 11 16 50 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in SchleswigHolstein on Fehmarn Is., 6 km E of the village of Burg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Katharinentalerhof (GER) (c. 48 55 40 N – 08 42 53 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 4 km NNE of Pforzheim. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kaufbeuren (GER) (47 52 10 N – 10 37 10 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 76 km SW of Munich in Bavaria and 1.2 km S of the town of Kaufbeuren. History: served as an emergency landing ground for many years before the war. Taken over by the Luftwaffe 1935-37 and developed into a major flight training field. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1100 x 1100 yards) and square in shape.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the hangars at the NE corner. The ammunition dump was in the woods off the S boundary. Infrastructure: had 1 very large, 3 large, 2 medium and 2 small hangars, the majority of these along the N boundary. All of them had paved hangar aprons except for the 2 small hangars. Separate workshops and a large motor pool were between the hangars on the NW side of the field. The majority of the airfield buildings comprising extensive barracks, offices and stores were located off the NW and N boundaries. Additionally, 2 small groups of buildings were 1 km S of the airfield on either side of a small hangar. Nearest rail connection was in the town of Kaufbeuren. Dispersal: no organized dispersals. Defenses: 2 light Flak guns were mounted on hangar rooftops at the NW and NE corners of the airfield (Oct 43). Remarks: 25 Feb 45: Kaufbeuren bombed by 13 B-17 Fortresses as a target of opportunity. Operational Units: Verbindungsstaffel 62 (Apr-Jun 42); TGr. 30 (Dec 43 – Mar 44, May-Jun 44); III./KG 26 (Aug-Oct 44); 3. Panzerjägerstaffel Bü 181 (Apr 45); 6. Panzerjägerstaffel Bü 181 (Apr 45). School Units: elementary flight school Kaufbeuren (Sep 35 – Mar 39); 1. Fl.Schuldivision (Jan – Apr 45); Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 23 (193941); Schule/FAR 23 (Apr – Oct 39); Schule.FAR 23, FFS A/B 23 then FFS A 23 (Aug 40 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Kaufbeuren (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 13/VII (c. Mar 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 14/VII (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Karl Deinhardt (1 Oct 36 - 31 Jan 39); Oberst Josef Pultar (1 Feb 39 ? ) 9/39. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Erg.Fl.H.Kdtr. Afrika (1942-43); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./ZG 1; Werft-Abt. 14/VII (1944-45); gem.Flak-Abt. 191(v) (c.Oct-Dec 42)?; Traktorenzug d.Lw. 7/VII (1944); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 119/VII (1944-45); Flieger-Ers.Abt. 23 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); Stab/Erg.Fl.H.Kdtr. Afrika ( ? – Nov 43); Ausb.und Sammel-Btl. Luftflotte 2 (Nov 43); Lw.-Einstellkommando 27 Kaufbeuren. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.211-213 (10 Jan 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kayhauserfeld (GER) (a.k.a. Wehnen) (53 10 20 N – 08 07 20 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Lower Saxony 51 km WNW of Bremen, 7 km WNW of Oldenburg city center and 3.6 km SW of Oldenburg airfield. History: in existence since before the war as a satellite for Oldenburg airfield. Used very little or not at all between 1940 and 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 730 meters (1300 x 800 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Infrastructure: no hangars, but had 10 large barrack blocks and other smaller buildings grouped on the S boundary. Nearest rail connection approx. 1 km from S boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 32 (Oldenburg) (1939). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. Wehnen (Kayhauserfeld) of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/XI Oldenburg (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.424 (27 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Kehl (GER) (48 33 43 N – 07 50 40 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 5 km SE of Strasbourg. History: No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kempten-Durach (GER) (47 41 35 N – 10 20 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Bavaria 105 km WSW of München (Munich) and 81 km SSE of Ulm; airfield 4 km SE of Kempten and immediately SW of the village of Durach. History: existed since 1938 as a small landing ground for training. Used for glider training and as a practice field for elementary flight training during the war, and also as a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for the Dornier firm. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 825 x 685 meters (900 x 750 yards). No paved runway. Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar with a paved hangar apron and an adjacent workshop building, both at the NE corner. Personnel were probably billeted in nearby villages and farms. Nearest rail connection was a branch line from Kempten to Durach which passed close to the NE corner of the landing area. Dispersal: no organized dispersal. Defenses: 6 Flak towers were around a building some 1190 meters (1300 yards) NW of the landing area. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS Fürstenfeldbruck/LKS 4 (1937-45); Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 23, FFS A/B 23 then FFS A 23 (Kaufbeuren) (1939-45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 15/VII Memmingen (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 1. Fliegerschuldivision (Kempten, 1944-45)?; 11.(Flum.Res.)/LuftgauNachr.Rgt. 7 (Kempten, 1944); 21.(le.Flugm.)/Ln.-Rgt. 227 (Kempten, Sep 44 – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.214-15 (12 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kenzingen (GER) (c. 48 12 03 N – 07 45 53 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 22 km NNW of Freiburg. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: pasture-land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ketterschwang (GER) (47 58 04 N – 10 41 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 68 km WSW of Munich and 10.5 km NNE of Kaufbeuren. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ketzin (GER) (52 28 30 N – 12 50 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Brandenburg 35 km W of Berlin, 19.5 km ENE of Brandenburg city and 1 km W of the village of Ketzin. History: located on an island just W of Ketzin and only reachable by boat, it was used as a glider train ground during the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 730 x 460 meters (800 x 500 yards) and L-shaped. Infrastructure: had a small shed in the SE corner. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.958 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kiel (GER) (54 19 N – 10 07 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates and not necessarily on the airfield): Luftkreiskdo. VI (See) (Apr 34 – Jul 38); Luftwaffenkdo. See (1938 – Jan 39); General d.Luftwaffe beim OKM (L.In. 8) (c.1941-45); Luftkreiskdo. VI; Kommandeur der Schiffe und Boote d.Lw. (Aug 40 – 1945); Fliegerhorst-Kommandantur 4/XI Schleswig-Land; Flak-Rgt. 61; Flak-Rgt. 62; Lsp.Abt. 202; Lsp.Abt.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 205; Luftschutzschule Kiel; Ln.-Rgt. 16; Seenotbereichskdo. VI; Seenotkdo. 28. City and port protected by Kriegsmarine (Navy) Flak. Kiel-Holtenau (GER) (Land and Sea) (54 23 00 N – 10 08 45 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) and seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) 5 km N of Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein. History: dates from 1913 and during World War I was the “mother station” for German naval aviation. The now disused land was taken over in 1927 and opened as a civil airport on 23 Apr 1928. Converted to military use beginning in 1934, officially designated a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur in 1935, with the first unit permanently based there from 1 March 1937. Both the airfield and the seaplane station were in constant use throughout the war. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 775 meters (1050 x 850 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface on sandy loam soil. No paved runway. Anchorage: seaplanes were moored in the small harbor at the N end of the base and were able to taxi straight out from the 2 slipways and take off. A large crane was adjacent to the larger of the two slipways. Fuel and Ammunition: ample refueling points and underground fuel storage. The munitions dump was located in a woods approx. 1.2 km from the NW corner of the airfield. Infrastructure: had a total of 10 hangars jointly served both the airfield and the seaplane station, most of them along E boundary of the airfield, and all had paved aprons. The main barrack blocks were at the NE and SE corners, and the station HQ, admin buildings, base stores and other facilities were also along the E side of the base. Taxiways and perimeter roads connected the various parts of the airfield and seaplane station. A special branch rail line served the E side of the airfield. Dispersal: the airfield had 6 dispersals with a total of 25 large aircraft shelters and 6 small shelters. Most of the shelters were open although some were covered with netting. The seaplane station had 13 large open shelters. Defenses: not noted. Remarks: Kiel city, the port, the seaplane station and the airfield were relentlessly bombed by both the RAF and the USAAF from 1939 to 1945, far too many times to record here.heine Operational Units: Luftdienst-Schleppstaffel Ostsee (Aug 34 – Jun 36); Fliegerstaffel J 1 (Oct 34 – Sep 35); Fliegerstaffel J 2 (Apr-Sep 35); 1./JG 136 (Oct 35 – c.Sep 36); 2./JG 136 (Oct 35 – Mar 36); Luftdienstverband II (Jul 36 – Dec 43?); Luftdienstkdo. 4 (Jul 36 – Dec 38); 5./Borfliegergruppe 196 (Jul 37 – Apr 40, Sep 40); II. (Jagd)/Trägergruppe 186 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); Luftdienst-Kdo. 64 (Jan 39 – Dec 43); I.(Stuka)/Trägergruppe 186 (Sep-Nov 39); 10.(See)/LG - 334 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 2 (Sep 39); 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 806 (Oct-Dec 39); Kü.Fl.Gr. 606 (Nov 39 – Jul 40); 1./Kampfgruppe 806 (Jan-May 40); Stab, 1./Kü.Fl.Gr. 706 (JanJun 40); Kurierstaffel Ob.d.M./OKM (1940-45); 1./Kü.Fl.Gr. 906 (JanApr 40); KGr.z.b.V. 105 (Mar-Apr 40); I./St.G. 1 (Apr 40); Transportstaffel (See) Kiel (c. Oct 40 – May 41); Seenotstaffel 7 (Mar 41); Aufkl.Gr. 125 (See) (Apr-Jun 41); Seenotstaffel 9 (Apr-Aug 41); Einsatzstaffel/JFS 2 (c. Jul-Oct 41); Erprobungskdo. 20 (Oct 42 – Oct 43); 2./Bordfl.Gr. 196 (Aug 43); 3./Bordfl.Gr. 196 (Oct 43 – Mar 44); IV./Fliegerzielgeschwader 1 (May 44); 13./Flieger-Zielgeschwader 1 (Mar, May 44); 14./Flieger-Zielgeschwader 1 (Dec 43 – c. Sep 44); Fliegerzielgruppe II (Jan 44 – 1945); Fliegerzielstaffel 4 (c. Sep 44 1945). Schools: navigation and sea rescue training was conducted at KielHoltenau. Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Seenotstaffel (Aug 39 – Apr 41). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. Kiel-Holtenau of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 4/XI Schleswig-Land (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Alfred Schuster? ( ? ? ) 1/43; Obstlt. Berthold Kreitlow ( ? - 8 May 45). Station Units (on various dates): Seenotbezirksstelle (L) Holtenau (Aug 38 - ? ); Seenotbereichskdo. VI (Apr 40 – 1943); Seenotzentrale (L) westliche Ostsee (Dec 41 – Jun 42); Seenotkdo. 28 (Aug 39 – Aug 44); Flugh.Betr.Kp. Kiel-Holtenau; Werft-Abt.d.Lw.(o) 207/XI (8 May 45); Luftzeuggruppe See (1933-44); Luftpark (See) 2/XI (c.1938-45); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 16/XI (8 May 45); Kfz.Beständebezirk d.Lw. 1/XI (Apr 44); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 8/See (1940-42). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.314-18 (11 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Kiliansdorf (GER): see Roth. Kirchberg (GER) (a.k.a. Maitzborn) (49 56 00 N – 07 25 20 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 62 km WSW of Wiesbaden, 48 km SSW of Koblenz, 17 km N of Kirn and adjacent to the village of Maitzborn. History: in existence by Oct 39 and used by both fighters and bombers in May-Jun 40. Little or no use after that date, but still listed as operational in Jan 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 825 x 685 meters (900 x 750 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. No paved runway. A perimeter track ran along the W boundary and part of the S boundary. Infrastructure: no hangars or workshops. There were 5 barrack-type buildings and a few small sheds grouped together off the W boundary. Additionally, a number of barracks were along the road from Kirchberg

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 to the NW corner of the landing area. The nearest rail connection was in Kirchberg. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Operational Units: I./JG 53 (Sep-Dec 39, May 40); part of I./JG 2 (May 40); III./KG 2 (Jun 40). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Lw.-Bau-Ers.Btl. XIII (1943). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.258 (11 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kirchenlaibach (GER): see Windischenlaibach. Kirchgöns (GER) (a.k.a. Kirch-Göns) (50 28 40 N - 08 38 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 13.5 km S of Giessen and 1 km NW of Kirch-Göns village. History: built 1936-37. Very little wartime use between May 40 and Dec 44. Dimensions: approx. 800 x 960 meters (875 x 1050 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: both were available when needed. Infrastructure: had a group of workshop-type buildings on the SW boundary that were connected by taxi track to the landing area. There was a small group of barracks off the SW boundary and a few stores buildings in the W corner. A branch rail line served both the SW and NW boundaries. Dispersal: just one area – the Northwest dispersal had 15 hardstands cut into the woods, fronted with a paved apron and connected by taxi tracks with the landing area. Remarks: 24 Dec 44: bombed by 54 B-17 Fortresses 27 Dec 44: reported to be completely bombed out and asked that field kitchens be brought up to feed its complement of 800. Operational Units: 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Nov 39 – May 40). For additional details go to Google and enter: Kirch-Göns site:ww2.dk . Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Kirch-Göns (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 14/XII (Mar 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 213/XII Merzhausen (Oct 44 – 1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Auffanglager d.Lw. Kirchgoens (Jan 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.319-20 (9 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Kirchham (GER) (48 20 15 N – 13 16 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Bavaria 31 km SSW of Passau and 1 km SSE of the village of Kircham. History: used during the war for glider training, a practice field for elementary flight training and as an emergency landing ground. Listed as still operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 825 x 730 meters (900 x 800 yards) with an irregular shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: there were 2 small buildings off the S corner. Personnel were probably billeted in nearby villages. Nearest rail connection was a branch of the München-Passau line just off the W boundary. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 14 then FFS A/B 14 (Klagenfurt). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Kirchham (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 4/VII (1940). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.216 (17 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kirchheim/Teck (GER) (a.k.a. Kirchheim unter Teck) (48 37 50 N – 09 25 55 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in BadenWürttemburg 27 km SE of Stuttgart, 19 km SW of Göppingen airfield, 4.5 km SSE of Kirchheim unter Teck and 1.6 km ESE of Dettingen unter Teck. History: used for glider training. From Feb to Apr 45, it was the testing and operational evaluation center for the Bachem Ba 349 Natter, a vertically launched rocket-powered interceptor that could not be brought into action before the war ended. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 800 x 620 meters (875 x 675 yards) with an irregular shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: had 2 small hangars off the SW corner, both with workshops and paved aprons, and one of the hangars with an attached boiler house. Additionally, 2 large, 1 medium and 1 small workshop buildings with paved aprons were along the N boundary. A factory building and several sheds were 1460 meters (1600 yards) to the SE of the landing area and connect by road to the buildings on the N boundary. Stores buildings were off the N boundary behind the workshops. Admin buildings and flight control were off the SW corner, while a few barrack hutsw were off the N boundary. Nearest rail connection in Dettingen. Dispersal: no organized dispersals. Operational Units: Erprobungskdo. 600 (Apr 45). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 35 (Feb 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.218-19 (14 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kirchhellen (GER) (a.k.a. Duisburg-Kirchhellen) (51 36 50 N – 06 52 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 19.5 km NNE of Duisburg city center, 18 km ESE of Wesel and 3.6 km WNW of Kirchhellen in - 337 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 North Rhine – Westphalia. History: In service by 1 May 40. The airfield was busy during the attack on France and the Low Countries in May-June 1940 and then fell into disuse until the beginning of 1945. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 825 meters (1200 x 900 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface with no paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: available as needed. Infrastructure: had a medium-size rectangular building off the SW corner that was possibly used as a workshop. Billeting was believed to be in 1 medium and 3 small buildings located in woods off the N boundary. Dispersal: there were about 20 aircraft bays in weeds off the N boundary but by Jan 44 these had become overgrown due to disuse. Defenses: 3 heavy Flak positions with 6 guns each were within 5 km of the airfield in Jan 44. Remarks: no major attacks by Allied aircraft noted. Operational Units: IV.(Stuka)/LG 1 (Apr-May 40); I./ZG 1 (5/40); II., III./KG 4 (Jun 40); I./JG 77 (28 Aug – 4 Sep 44); II./JG 26 (Sep-Nov 44); elements of NSGr. 1 (Feb-Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 219/XI (c.Oct 44 – c.Feb 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): part of Flakscheinw.Abt. 248(o) (Jun 41); part of gem.Flak-Abt. 382(o) (Apr 42). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.321 (8 Jan 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Kirchtroisdorf (GER): see Pütz-Kirchtroisdorf. Kirrlach (GER) (49 15 00 N – 08 32 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 21 km SSW of Heidelberg, 10.5 km SE of Speyer and 1.6 km NW of Kirrlach village. History: dates from late 1939 or early 1940 when it was set up for the forthcoming campaign against France. It was reduced to caretaker status from mid-1940 to mid-1944 and then rehabilitated and used to March 1945. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 980 x 775 meters (1070 x 850 yards) with an “L” shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: no hangars or workshops, but there were 2 small huts at the S corner that may have been used as accommodations. Nearest rail connection at Waghäusel, 4 km NW of Kirrlach village. Dispersal: aircraft were parked on the edge of a woods along the N boundary and off the W corner. Remarks: none. Operational Units: III./SG 4 (Nov-Dec 44); III./JG 53 (Dec 44 – Mar 45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 215/XII GrossSachsenheim (Oct/Nov 44 – Feb 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 1. and 2./le.FlakAbt. 721 (Dec 44 – 1945). - 338 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.217 (12 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kirtorf (GER) (50 47 35 N – 09 05 05 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Hesse 37 km NE of Giessen, 25 km E of Marburg an der Lahn and 3.25 km NE of Kirtorf village. History: built in 1936-37 but used very little until late fall 1944. In Mar 45, it was used for night attacks on the Ludendorff Bridge at Remagen on the Rhine. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 1000 meters (1200 x 1100 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface (no paved runway). Fuel and Ammunition: available when needed. Infrastructure: no hangars. Station buildings and a few barracks were in woods off the S boundary. A branch rail line served the S boundary. Dispersal: 2 areas – East Dispersal and Northwest Dispersal, each with 6 aircraft handstands. Defenses: not noted. Remarks: 24 Mar 45: bombed by 65 B-24 Liberators. Operational Units: II./KG 1 (Feb-Jun 40); 5./TG 3 (Aug-Sep 44); II./SG 4 (Dec 44); III./KG 200 (Jan 45); NSGr. 2 (Mar-Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 119 (Kassel-Rothwesten) (1941-43). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Kirtorf (1939 – 194?); Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Kirtorf (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 12/XII (Mar 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 21/VII Giessen (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates): Werftkdo. (o) 141/XII (Dec 44); elements of Luftminen-Zug 3 (Mar 45); Stab/Flak-Abt. 112 (Jan 44); Ldssch.Zug (mot) 101/XI (Dec 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.322 (8 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Kissingen (GER): see Bad Kissingen. Kitzingen (GER) (49 44 30 N – 10 12 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 20 km ESE of Würzburg in Bavaria and 2.4 km E of the town of Kitzingen. History: completed 1934 and a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Kitzingen was a very active pre-war and wartime airfield for dive-bomber training, the rest, refitting and re-equipping of bomber units and then night fighter operations during 1944-45. Dimensions: approx. 1600 x 870 meters (1750 x 950 yards). Surface: artificially drained grass surface on sandy sub-soil. Runways: one concrete runway approx. 1600 meters (1750 yards) in length aligned NE/SW. Equipped for night landings with boundary and obstruction lighting, flare path, beam approach system and the short version of the visual Lorenz system.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points along SE and SW boundaries with underground bulk storage tanks probably on the S boundary. Ammunition dump on the S boundary. The fuel and munitions storage areas were served by a branch rail line. Infrastructure: had 7 hangars - 2 very large, 4 large and 1 medium along the N boundary. Station motor pool and garages were at the NW corner, and engine test beds were behind the hangars on the N boundary. Station HQ, barracks, messhalls, duty quarters and other admin buildings were immediately behind the hangars on the N boundary. Stores buildings were at the NW corner while officers’ quarters and mess were to the NNW on the edge of a woods. Dispersal: there were two dispersal areas, South and Northeast, with a total of 3 large open aircraft shelters and 6 aircraft bays cut into a woods. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 10 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 88s destroyed and 1 more damaged. 24 Oct 44: closed due to extensive construction work underway. 29 Jan 45: low-level attack – 1 x Me 262 A-2 from 1./KG(J) 51 destroyed. 6 Feb 45: low-level attack by 4 P-51 Mustangs – 2 x Ju 88 G-6s from IV./NJG 6 destroyed on the ground. 23 Feb 45: marshaling yards bombed by 95 B-17 Fortresses and a low-level attack on the airfield by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x He 111s, 2 x Bf 110s and 1 x He 177 destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 110 damaged. 22 Mar 45: airfield bombed by 168 B-24 Liberators and a low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – 5 x Me 262 A-1s from II./KG(J) 54 and several Ju 88s from II./NJG 6 destroyed or damaged on the ground; runway and landing area hard hit with numerous craters; 5 hangars damaged; airfield out of service. (German report) A revised German report states 10 x Me 262s, 1 x Bf 110, 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x Fw 58 destroyed, and 5 x Me 262s, 4 x Ju 88s and 2 x He 111s damaged. Airfield Units: Operational Units: Fliegergruppe Kitzingen (1935 – Apr 36); I./St.G. 165 (Apr 36 – Apr 39); I./St.G. 51 (May-Jul 39); Stab and I./KG 2 (Nov 39 – Feb 40); I./KG 3 (Mar-May 40); Stab, 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 14 (May-Jun 41); III./St.G. 2 (Nov 41 - Feb 41); I./ZG 26 (Oct 41 – Mar 42); III./KG 77 (Dec 41 – Jan 42); Stab, III./KG 76 (Apr-May 42); II./KG 76 (Apr-Jul 43); Luftbeobachtungsstaffel 7 (Mar-May 44); Stab/NJG 6 (Dec 44 – May 45); II./KG(J) 54 (Jan-Mar 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: Stukaschule Kitzingen (Apr – Oct 39); 6. and 8./NJSchool 1 (Nov 42 – Mar 43); I./St.G. 101 (Dec 42 – Jan 43); FFS A/B 24 (Feb – Jun 43); 7. and 9./NJG 101 (Mar – Dec 43); IV./NJG 101 (Jul – Dec 43); Stab and I./NJG 102 (Dec 43 – Jun 44); III./NJG 102 (Jun – Jul 44); III./NJG 101 (Jun – Nov 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Schulstaffel/NJG 6 (Jun – Nov 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Kitzingen (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 29/XII (May 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 11/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 27/VII (Jun 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftgaustab z.b.V. 100 (Feb-May 40); Nachtjagdraumführer 106 (Jul 42 – May 44); Flugh.Betr.Kp. Kitzingen; I./Flak-Rgt.28 (1936 – Nov 38); I./Flak-Rgt. 19 (Nov 38 – 1939); Luftkriegsschule 6 (Flak) (Nov 39 – Mar 45); Luftgau-Flakartillerieschule XII/XIII (1941-42); FeldFlakartillerieschule (Mitte) 12 (1942-43); Flak-Ers.Abt. 19 (1939 – Feb 40); Stab III.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 205 (c.Apr 43 – Aug 44); Luftpark Eschwege (Kitzingen?) (1941); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 11/VI (Aug 40); Traktorenzug d.Lw. 14/VII (1944); Offz.Bewerber-Ausb.Rgt. d.Lw. 2 (Flak) (Feb-Apr 45); Kraftfahr-Ausbildungs-Abt. d.Lw. 9 (c.1941-44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.220-22 (22 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Klausheide (GER) (a.k.a. Clausheide): see Nordhorn. Kleestadt (GER) (a.k.a. Altheim-Kleestadt) (49 54 40 N – 08 57 10 E) General: satellite field and parking area for aircraft not in use (Abstellplatz and Schattenplatz) in Hesse 16 km SW of Aschaffenburg, 6.5 km WSW of Grossostheim airfield, 4.5 km SSW of Babenhausen and immediately N of the village of Kleestadt. History: under construction in fall 1944 and was still unfinished in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 915 x 275 meters (1000 x 300 yards). No paved runway. Infrastructure: none. The Hanau – Eberbach rail line passed close to the W boundary. Dispersal: a woods off the E side offered concealment for parked aircraft. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): FliegerGeräteausgabestelle (mot) 101/XIV (Dec 44 – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.231 (24 Feb 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kleinkarolinenfeld (GER) (a.k.a. Klein-Karolinenfeld) (47 56 07 N – 11 45 53 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 29 km SSE of Munich and 7.5 km NE of Holzkirchen airfield. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Klein Eichen (GER) (a.k.a. Klein-Eichen, Kleineichen) (50 30 00 N – 18 04 30 E) General: alternative airfield, satellite airfield or dispersal airfield (Ausweichflugplatz or Schattenplatz) in Silesia 23 km SSE of Oppeln (Opole). History: laid out in the late 1930’s and used during the Sep 39 attack on Poland, but no evidence found of any use after than date. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kleinhausen (GER) (a.k.a. today, Einhausen) (49 39 45 N – 08 31 45 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Hesse 15 km E of Worms, 3.25 km SE of Biblis airfield and 1.6 km SW of Einhausen. History: work on this strip began in late 1944 or early 1945. Not completed and no evidence of use by operational units. Surface and Dimensions: grass on a prepared surface with a maximum run of approx. 1740 meters (1900 yards) had it been completed. Infrastructure: had a few huts on the edge of the woods close to the E end of the landing strip. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.26 (22 Mar 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kleinkötz (GER) (c. 48 25 05 N – 10 17 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 22.5 km E of Ulm and c. 5 km S of Leipheim. History: no information or mention of wartime use by Luftwaffe aircraft found; may have been an alternate field or satellite for Leipheim airfield. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): a Luftmunitionsanstalt located there. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Klein-Kummersfeld (GER): see Neumünster – Klein Kummersfeld. Kleinraschütz (GER) (a.k.a. Klein-Raschütz) (51 18 04 N – 13 29 52 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: located in Saxony 32 km NNW of Dresden and 2 km NW of Grossenhain town center. History: alternate field or satellite for Grossenhain airfield, 4.5 km to the ENE. Listed as operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Klein Welzheim (GER) (50 03 04 N – 09 00 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 25.5 km ESE of Frankfurt/M. and 11.5 km SE of Hanau. History: set up in the second half of 1944 as an alternate landing ground and dispersal field for the numerous airfields in the Frankfurt/M. area, especially Zellhausen which was just 4 or 5 km to the SW. Known to have been used by TGr. 30 in Nov-Dec 44. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: chronologies; AFHRA, BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Klepzig (GER): see Köthen-Klepzig. Kletzen (GER) (51 27 04 N – 12 24 53 E) General: landing ground in Saxony 12 km NNE of Leipzig and c. 4.25 km N of Leipzig-Mockau airfield, for which it was probably an alternate field or a satellite. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Klotzsche (GER): see Dresden-Klotzsche. Klützow (GER): see Stargard-Klützow. Koblenz (GER) (50 21 N – 07 35 E ) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates): Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/Flak-Rgt. 7 (mot) (1940); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 50(o) (Feb-Oct 40); Stab/Flakscheinw.Rgt. 70(o) (Aug 43 – Apr 44); Flakscheinw.Abt. 200(o) (Jan-Apr 44); Res.Festungs-Flak-Abt. 311(v) (Nov 40); gem.Flak-Abt. 391(v) (Aug 39 – 1940); gem.Flak-Abt. 601(v) (1945); schw.Flak-Abt. 684(o) (May-Jun 42); Flakscheinw.Abt. 708(o) (Aug 39 – Apr 43); part of le.Flak-Abt. 952 (ETr.) (1943); 10./le.Flak-Abt. 987(o) (Feb-Apr 44); Stab/Flak-Ers.Rgt. 2 (1944); Flak-Ers.Abt. 39 (Koblenz-Niederberg) (Dec 40 – 1945). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Flugmelde-Funk-Kp. z.b.V. 22 (Jan 45); Fluko Koblenz. Koblenz-Karthause (GER) (50 20 30 N – 07 34 15 E) General: field landing ground (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 2.4 km SW of Koblenz. History: situated on an old military parade ground that was in existence prior to 1933. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 585 - 343 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 meters (1,200 x 640 yards). Runway: grass surface with the landing area surrounded by a perimeter track. Infrastructure: had 1 medium hangar and a few small sheds off the N corner. Nearest rail connection in Koblenz. Dispersal: no organized dispersal areas. Defenses: protected by the Flak belt around Koblenz with 8 heavy and 7 light Flak positions surrounding the landing ground out to a distance of 5 kilometers. Most of the positions had multiple guns. Remarks: 1939-45: Koblenz was repeatedly bombed throughout the war by both the RAF and the USAAF and many of these bombs undoubtedly fell on the airfield due to its proximity to the city. 8 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 3 x Fw 190s, 1 x Bf 109 and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed. 18 Mar 45: Koblenz taken by U.S. forces. Operational Units: 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Aug 39 – May 40); I./St.G. 1 (Jan-Mar 40); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Jan-May 40); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Jan-May 40). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 6/XVII (Apr – c.Aug 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 2/XII Diedenhofen (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 18/VII Diedenhofen (1944); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 225/XII Niedermendig (c.Oct 44 – Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 8. (Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 12 (1939-45); Kfz.Werkstatt-Kp. (o) d.Lw. 103/XI (fall 44 – 1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.96-97 (4 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kohlow (GER) (a.k.a. Kowalow, Kowalów) (c. 52 24 N – 14 45 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Brandenburg c. 15 km ENE of Frankfurt/Oder. History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kohlenbissen (GER) (52 59 10 N – 10 09 50 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz), later reclassified as a landing ground (Landeplatz) and then as an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Lower Saxony 33 km SSW of Lüneburg (SE of Hamburg) and 2 km E of Munster. Not to be confused with the city of Münster. History: dates from 1937 when the land was acquired, cleared, leveled, grass planted and a few buildings and bunkers built including a station HQ (Horstkommandantur). Used very little until late 1943/early 1944 when it began to be used as an aircraft park. Some experimental flights with chemical warfare (i.e., poison gas) bombs and spraying equipment occurred here under the auspices of Versuchsstelle d.Lw. Münster-Nord that was located nearby. Dimensions: 1,150 x 1,000 meters. Surface and Runways: grass - 344 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 surface (no paved runway). Fuel and Ammunition: Had a very large munitions dump in woods S of the landing area. Infrastructure: Barrack hut camp at the SW corner. A branch rail line served the SW corner of the field and the munitions dump. Dispersal: one area in woods off the NW corner and another in woods off the SE boundary with a total of 23 small aircraft bays. Defenses: not noted. Remarks: 7 Apr 45: bombed by 93 B-17 Fortresses – 44 parked aircraft and several buildings and barracks were destroyed and the landing area heavily cratered and rendered unusable. The airfield was abandoned a short time later. Operational Units: none identified. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 10 (gliders) (c. 1941-45); Stab/SG 103 (Oct 44 – Mar 45); I./SG 103 (Oct – Nov 44); II./SG 103 (Jan – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 10/XI (Feb/Mar-May 40); Flugplatzkdo. Kohlenbissen of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 21/XI Lüneburg (194445). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Lw.-Bau-Kp. 59/XI (1937-38); elements of Versuchsstelle d.Lw. Münster/Nord 1938-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.323-25 (21 Sep 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Kolbatz (GER) (a.k.a. Kolbacz) (c. 53 18 08 N – 14 48 49 E) General: Landeplatz in Pomerania 24 km SE of Stettin (Szczecin) 15 km WSW of Stargard (Stargard Szczecinski). History: No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kolberg (GER) (a.k.a. Kołobrzeg) (54 12 00 N – 15 40 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 108 km NE of Stettin on the Baltic coast of Pomerania; airfield 7 km ENE of Kolberg and 1.6 km W of the village of Bodenhagen. History: built 1935-36 and inaugurated as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936, although construction was still underway in 1938. Used as a bomber training station before and during the war. In late 1944, as the front approached from the East, operational units began occupying Kolberg. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 685 meters (1300 x 750 yards) and roughly oval in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Had two parallel runways built during 1942-43 across the landing area, both measuring approx. 1150 meters (1250 yards) with a separation of approx. 135 meters (150 yards). Wide taxiways abutted both ends of both runways. A - 345 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 perimeter road ran along the E, W and S boundaries of the airfield. Both runways were illuminated and equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were located on the servicing hardstands and a small ammunition dump was off the NE corner. Infrastructure: there were 4 large flight hangars and 1 large repair hangar with paved hangar aprons in a row along the S boundary. Additionally, 2 rectangular buildings with paved aprons that were near the hangars were probably workshops. In front of the hangars and paved aprons were 22 ladder-type servicing hardstands laid out in 3 parallel rows. The station motor pool and garages were to the rear of the repair hangar. The station buildings – some 43 of them – were all behind the hangars and included admin offices, barracks, classrooms, messes, stores dispensary and various station services. A branch rail line from Kolberg served the hangar and building area on the S boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities (Dec 43). Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 18 Mar 45: Kolberg taken by Russian and Polish forces. Operational Units: IV./KG 152 (Apr 38 – Apr 39); Stab, I./KG 1 (MayOct 39); elements of III./NJG 5 (1943-44); IV./TG 1 (Sep 43); 7./KG 200 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); Stab, 1./NAGr. 3 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); Wekusta 26 (Ost) (Jan-Feb 45); Stab/FAGr. 2 (Jan-Feb 45); Aufkl.St. 2. (F)/Nacht (Jan 45); 3.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Jan-Feb 45); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Jan-Feb 45); Nahaufkl.St. 4./31 (Jan-Feb 45)?; III./SG 1 (FebMar 45). School Units: twin-engined conversion school Kolberg (Nov 39 – Jan 40), FFS C 6 then FFS B 6 (Jan 40 – Feb 45); Bordschützenschule 2 (1940 – c. 1942); Arbeitsplatz for BFS 4 then FFS B 34 (KopenhagenKastrup) (Apr 41 – Feb 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./KG 26 (Feb-Sep 44); II./EKG 1 (Feb 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Kolberg (to c. Sep 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 21/III (c Sep 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 3/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Robert Krause ( ? - Oct 39); Obstlt. Otto Fruhner (Nov 39 - Aug 40); Obstlt. Carl Berr (Aug 41 ? ). Lw. Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Koflug 1/III (Jul 39 – c.Feb 43); Koflug 11/XI (c.Jan-Mar 45); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 1 (May-Oct 39); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 1 (May-Oct 39); Werft-Abt. 26/III (1944-45); 126. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (Feb 45); Werft-Kp. 37/III (1941); Lufttorpedo- 346 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Betr.Kp. 3 (Jan 45); Flakschiessplatz Kolberg (Jan-Mar 45); Stab V. (Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 221 (Henkenhagen/Ustronie Morskie, Sep 44 – c.Mar 45); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 1/III; E-HafenAusrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 2/III; E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 4/III; E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 5/III; Lw.-Sanitäts-Abt. 1/III (c. Jul 39 – Feb 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.681-83 (28 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kolbingen (GER) (c. 48 03 05 N – 08 52 53 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 85 km SSW of Stuttgart and 10 km NE of Tuttlingen. History: No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: Grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kolitzheim (GER) (49 55 15 N – 10 15 55 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 15 km SSE of Schweinfurt and 2 km E of Kolitzheim. History: probably laid out in the late 1930’s and briefly used until mid-1940, but there was no known activity there from then until fall 1944 when the runway extension was added and night fighters began using it. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 825 x 825 meters (900 x 900 yards) with an additional 320 meter (350 yard) extension to the E. Boundary and obstruction lighting and a flare path existed for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: an ammunition dump was hidden in the woods off the SE corner. Infrastructure: there were 2 small hangars at the SW corner and a few more sheds along the S and W boundaries. A small group of barrack huts had been set up in the woods off the SW corner. Nearest rail connection at Alitzheim. Dispersal: a Southeast and a Southwest dispersal had a total of 21 aircraft bays cut into the woods. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.28-29, 230 (12 Feb 44 updated to 7 Mar 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kölleda (GER) (51 11 30 N – 11 13 40 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 27 km NNE of Erfurt in Thuringia, 25 km NNW of Weimar and 2.5 km WNW of Kölleda. History: built 1935-36 and established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Used as an equipment depot and air park from 1938 to the end of the war. From

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 1942, it was also a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for ATG (a Junkers sub-contractor). Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 1100 meters (1200 x 1200 yards) and roughly circular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, a flare path, a beam approach system and the short form of the visual Lorenz system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the hangars. Infrastructure: Kölleda had 3 very large hangars on the NE boundary, and 1 very large, 1 large repair type and 1 medium hangar on the NW boundary, all with paved hangar aprons and interconnected by taxiways. The ATG factory was on the S boundary along with the station buildings and barracks. A branch rail line from Kölleda encircled the airfield serving the hangars at the N end and all the buildings at the S end. Dispersal: aircraft were parked in open fields off the NE, NW and SE sides of the landing area. There were also a total of 4 large open aircraft shelters including 2 at the SE corner. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 7 Jul 44: bombed by 102 B-17 Fortresses. 20 Jul 44: bombed by 23 B-17s. 24 Aug 44: bombed by 30 B-17s. Operational Units: none identified. Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stab and I./Erg.Aufklärungsgeschwader 1 (Jan – Apr 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Kölleda (to 1943); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 30/III (1944-45). Kommandant (not complete): Oberst Rudolf Schonger (Mar 43 - 6 Jul 43); Obstlt. Georg Steinsiek (6 Jul 43 - Aug 43); Oberst Paul Dressler (Aug 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Luftzeugamt 1/IV (c. 1938-45); Luftpark Kölleda (c. 1938-43); Werft-Abt. 23/III (194445); Werft-Kp 22 (n.d.); Flieger-Geräteausgabestelle (Eis.) 54/XI (Sep 43 - ). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.684-85 (4 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Köln (GER) (50 56 14 N – 06 57 37 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Stab/I. Fliegerkorps (c.Oct 39 – May 40).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Servicing, Repair (Wartungs, Instandsetzungs): Werft-Kp. 49 (n.d.). Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: Stab/LV-Kdo. 7 (Feb 40 – Aug 41); Stab/7. Flak-Div. (Sep 41 – Mar 45); Stab/1. Flak-Brig. (Feb/Mar 45). Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 14 (as Flakgruppe Köln, 1942 – 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 21 (as Flakgruppe Köln, Jun 41 – Apr 42); Stab/Flakscheinw.Rgt. 47 (as Flakgruppe Köln?, c.Jun 41 – 1942); Stab/Flakscheinw.Rgt. 84 (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Köln, Jul 41 – Mar 44); Stab/Flakscheinw.Rgt. 113 (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Köln, Mar 44 – Apr 45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 114 (Aug 40 – Jan 42). Flak-Abt.: I./Flak-Rgt. 19 (Oct 36 – 1937); gem.144 (Aug 39); gem.145 (Aug 39 - ?); s.145 (Eisb.) (c.Oct-Dec 43); s.146 (Aug 39 – Nov/Dec 43); s.244 (1939-41); 6., 7./s.246 (Sep 44 – 1945?); s.351 (1941); 3./s.353 (Dec 43 – Mar 44); part of s.354 (Jan 42); gem.361 (1940); gem.373 (Eisb.) (1942); s.381 (1943-45); s.386 (1941-43); s.416 (Eisb.) (Oct 44 – 1945); 4./s.446 (Jun-Aug 44); s.465 (1939-45); gem.511 (1941-42); part of s.512 (Jun 44 – 1945); 1./s.514 (Mar-Apr 44); s.543 (Eisb.) (c.Oct 42 – Feb 43); 5./gem.553 (Sep-Oct 44); part of gem.554 (Oct/Nov 44); 6./s.625 (Aug-Sep 44); s.666 (Dec 43 – 1945); part of s.707 (Nov/Dec 44); 4./le.737 (Oct/Nov 43, Mar/Apr 44); le.749 (1942-45); part of le.784 (Mar-May 44, Dec 44 – 1945); le.821 (Eisb.) (Nov 41 – 1942, Oct 44 – 1945); part of le.886 (May 44 – 1945); part of le.889 (1943-45); s.902 (Eisb.) (Sep 44 – 1945); le.915 (Jun-Oct 44); 1./le.960 (ETr.) (Jun-Jul 44). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 130 (c.1942 – Feb 44); 148 (Aug 39 – 1939/40); 149 (Aug 39 – 1939/40); 159 (1942/43 – 1945); 270 (1941/42 – 1945); 4./329 (1943 – Feb 44); 330 (Apr 43 – Mar 44); 408 (Aug 40 – 1945); 438 (1942/43 – 1945); 1./518 (Dec 43 – Feb 44); 586 (Oct 43 – Feb 44). Luftsperr-Abt.: 101 (Jun 44 – 1945). Other Flak: Kdr. d.Flakinstandsetzung 102/VI (1944-45); FlakWaffenwerkstatt (o) 6/VI (1944-45); Flak-Waffenwerkstatt (o) 7/VI (1944-45). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 18 (1943; Apr-Jul 44); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 27 (1939-43); Nebel-Kp. d.Lw. 47 (1944-45)?; Sprengkommando d.Lw. 2/VI. Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab, I.(Feldfernkabel-Bau), II.(Tel.Bau) and III.(Tel.Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. 11 (K-Westhoven, Mar-May

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 40); 11.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 6 (Aug 43); Lv-Nachr.Abt. 7 (Feb 40 – Sep 41); Ln.-Abt. 127 (c.Sep 41 – Mar 45). Köln-Butzweilerhof (GER) (a.k.a. Köln) (50 59 00 N – 06 53 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 7.2 km NW of Köln in North Rhine – Westphalia and 1.6 km SW of Longerich. History: previously Köln’s civil airport (Verkehrsflughafen) with customs office. Used by twin-engine fighter units and long-range reconnaissance units until summer 1940. Köln’s largest wartime airfield, but its use was rather limited until 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1650 x 915 meters (1,800 x 1,000 yards). Runway: grass surface with sand surroundings. Equipped for night landings. Infrastructure: fuel, refueling points, water, ammunition, communications and other amenities were available. Had 1 large and 2 small hangars along the SE boundary along with workshop and admin buildings, motor pool and flying control (Flugleitung). There was a small block of barracks at the N end of the SE boundary and a much larger barrack camp about 2 km to the SE of the airfield. Served by a branch railway. Dispersal: areas to the N and SE had a total of at least 45 open aircraft shelters covered with camouflage netting. Defenses: had at least 4 heavy and 5 light Flak positions within 4 kilometers of the airfield in Feb 44. Satellites and Decoys: Köln-Lövenich (GER) (50 57 38 N – 06 51 00 E). Dummy 7.3 km WNW of Köln, 4.5 km SW of Köln-Butzweilerhof airfield and 2.5 km NNE of Lövenich. Mock-up included 4 imitation hangars and a general layout that simulated Köln-Butzweilerhof airfield complete with its own dummy flarepath. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.608 (1944)] Remarks: 1940-45: Köln was bombed continuously during the war and many of the bombs fell on its three airfields, Butzweilerhof, Ostheim and Wahn. 10 Nov 44: bombed by 96 B-17 Fortresses. 17 Nov 44: airfield unserviceable due to runway craters; Russians and Ukrainian women being used to effect repairs. Jan 45: landing area reported to be greatly damaged making the airfield only partly usable. 6 Mar 45: Köln taken by U.S. forces. Operational Units: I./JG 234 (Apr-Jun 37); Stab, I., II./St.G. 77 (Sep 39 – May 40); I.(Jagd)/LG 2 (Dec 39 – Feb 40); 17./KGr. z.b.V. 5 (May 40); 11.(N)/JG 2 (May 40); Stab, I., III./KG 1 (May-Jun 40); KGr. z.b.V. 106 (Aug-Oct 40); Stab, II./JG 53 (Dec 40 – Mar 41);

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 II./NJG 2 (Apr-Jun 44, Aug-Dec 44); Stab/NJG 2 (Jul-Dec 44); II./SG 4 (Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Butzweilerhof (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 11/VI (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. Köln-Butzweilerhof (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 17/VI (1943 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 9/VI (Apr 44 – Mar 45). Kommandant (not complete): Obstlt. Peter Bouillon (25 Sep 43 - 7 Mar 44?). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): part of Lw.-Bau-Btl. 109/XI (K) (Oct 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.99-104 (7 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Köln-Hohenberg (GER) (50 56 50 N – 07 02 10 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) 2 km N of KölnOstheim airfield in North Rhine – Westphalia. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Köln-Ostheim (GER) (50 56 25 N – 07 03 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 7.3 km E of Köln city center in North Rhine – Westphalia, airfield immediately NE of Ostheim. History: planning dates from tne end of 1934 but the construction did not begin in earnest until 21 April 1936 and the airfield was not put into commission until 8 June 1937. Ostheim was busy until the conclusion of the campaign in the West in summer 1940 and from then to 1944 it was used mainly as a transit airfield, particularly for night fighters. Night fighter and night ground attack units were stationed there from September 1944 to March 1945. Dimensions: approx. 1150 x 915 meters (1250 x 1000 yards) with a pear-shaped landing area. Surface and Runways: drained grass surface. No paved runway (Dec 43). A concrete perimeter road surrounded the landing area. Equipped with a N/S flarepath, perimeter and obstruction lighting, beam approach and a visual Lorenz system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points in front of the hangars with underground fuel storage probably off the SE corner. Infrastructure: had 1 large hangar, 1 large repair hangar and 3 medium hangars in a row along the NW corner with a wide, paved servicing apron in front of them. The hangars were all camouflaged with netting. Workshops and the motor pool were adjacent to the repair hangar. Station HQ, flight control building, admin and stores buildings, barracks, messes and other base services were in a long curving row behind the hangars. Nearest rail connection 2.5 km SE of the landing area. - 351 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: 2 dispersal areas – East and West with a total of 36 open aircraft shelters. Defenses: in the immediate vicinity of the airfield were 7 heavy Flak positions (4 to 6 guns each) and 6 light Flak positions, one of these being emplaced in Flak towers. Satellites and Decoys: Köln-Heumar (GER) (50 54 35 N – 07 04 05 E). Dummy 9 km ESE of Köln city center, 6.5 km NW of Köln-Wahn airfield and 3.25 km S of Köln-Ostheim airfield. Mock-up included 4 imitation hangars and a general layout that simulated Köln-Ostheim airfield complete with its own flarepath. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.606 (1944)] Remarks: Köln (Cologne) bombed continuously by the RAF and the USAAF from 1940-45, and Ostheim airfield was hit many times. 10 Nov 44: bombed by 97 B-17 Fortresses. 17 Nov 44: airfield unserviceable indefinitely due to runway craters; Russians and Ukrainian women being used to effect repairs. 10 Jan 45: bombed by 83 B-17s - 14 x Ju 87s from NSGr. 2 put out of action with minor to severe damage. 6 Feb 45: bombed by 12 B-17s as a target of opportunity. 8 Mar 45: airfield evacuated and captured by elements of U.S. 13th Armored Div. on 13 April. Operational Units: I./JG 234 (Jun 37 – Oct 38); I./JG 132 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); I./Trägergruppe 186 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 2/6 (Jan 39 – Dec 43); I./JG 26 (May-Oct 39); 11.(Nacht)/LG 2 (c. Aug-Nov 39); Stab/St.G. 2 (Oct 39 – May 40); I./St.G. 76 (Oct 39 – May 40); Aufkl.St.(F)/II. Flakkorps (Dec 39 – Jul 40); Wekusta 26 (May-Jun 40); 17./KGr.z.b.V. 5 (May 40); II./KG 1 (May-Jun 40); Stab, III./KG 54 (May-Jul 40); I./KG 76 (May-Jun 40); SanitätsFlugbereitschaft 7 (Jun 40); Erprobungsgruppe 210 (Jul 40); 12./JG 2 (Jun 40); Erg.Gr./NJG 1 (Jan-Feb 41); 3./Gruppe West (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (Jul 44); I./SKG 10 (Sep 44); NSGr. 2 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); I./SG 4 (Dec 44). Station Commands: Koflug 4/VI; Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 26/VI (1943 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/VI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Hptm. Walter Grabmann (15 Mar 37 - 31 Aug 38). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Köln-Ostheim (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 4/VI (Apr 41 – Mar 45); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp. Erprobungsgruppe 210 (Jul 40); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./Erprobungsgruppe 210 (Jul 40); Werftkdo. 126/XII (one Zug) (1 Jan 45); FeldLuftmunitionslager 4/VI (Bensberg – Dec 44); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 15/VI (May 42); Flug-Betr.St.Kol. 509/XII (1 Jan 45); E-Hafen- 352 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 16/VI; E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 36/VI (Erker Mühle). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.427-32 (14 Jan 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site fliegerhorste.de] Köln-Wahn (GER) (c. 50 52 00 N – 07 07 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) later upgraded to an airfield (Fliegerhorst) 13-14 km SE of Köln in North Rhine – Westphalia and 4 km E of the prominent loop in the Rhine at the south end of Köln. History: dates from 1913 when it opened as a training field for artillery spotter aircraft. Taken over by the Luftwaffe by 1938 and greatly expanded. It was very active during the German attack on France and the Low Countries in May-June 1940 but then fell into relative inactivity until September 1944. From then through Feb 45, it was used mainly by ground attack units and less frequently by single-engine fighters. Today, Köln-Wahn is Köln-Bonn International Airport. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 1000 meters (1400 x 1100 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface that presented difficulties in wet weather. No paved runway. Equipped for night landings but details lacking other than the presence of boundary and obstruction lighting. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points on the S boundary and at the NE corner with bult fuel storage at the NW corner. A large munitions dump was concealed in a woods off the SW corner. Infrastructure: 1 medium and 1 small hangar were off the SW corner and these were surrounded by a number of workshops. A very large motor pool with garages as at the NW corner. Station HQ, barrack blocks, accommodations for flying personnel, a large supply depot and other station buildings were located in a woods approx. 800 meters off the SW corner. Beginning 400 meters N of the station buildings was a very large Kaserne for thousands of troops that ran on to the N for at least 3 km. This Kaserne was mostly used by Luftwaffe Fallschirmjäger during 1944-45. Station Flak troops were billeted in a separate barrack complex off the NW corner. A special branch rail line served the airfield. Dispersal: there were 3 dispersal areas – South, Northeast and Northwest with a total of 22 open aircraft shelters and 9 blast bays. Defenses: no information found regarding Flak positions. In addition to its own Flak, K-Wahn benefited from the intense Flak umbrella that protected the major industrial city of Köln. Satellites and Decoys: 3 dummy/decoy airfields were set up near Wahn, one 6.5 km to the NW, one 5.7 km to the ESE and one 8 km to the SSE. - 353 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Remarks: 24 Dec 44: unserviceable due to bomb damage. Operational Units: III./St.G. 51 (Sep 39 – May 40); I./St.G. 1 (Oct 39 – Jan 40); I./JG 77 (Nov 39); 5.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Nov 39 – May 40); Stab, II./ZG 76 (Apr-Jun 40); II./KG 76 (May-Jun 40); 1. (H)/Aufkl.Gr. 11 (Apr-May 41); 1./NAGr. 13 (Sep 44); III./JG 27 (SepOct 44); 3./NAGr. 13 (Sep 44 – Mar 45); NSGr. 1 (c. Oct-Dec 44); NSGr. 2 (Oct 44 – Mar 45); NSGr. 20 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); Stab, I., II., III./SG 4 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); IV./KG 200 (Dec 44 – Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Wahn (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 13/VI (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 228/XI (c.Oct-Nov 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 232/XI (c.Nov 44 – Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. (v) 112/XI (1944 – Feb 45); schw.Flak-Abt. 331 (Oct/Nov 44 – Mar 45); elements of schw.Flak-Abt. 902 (Eisb.) (Feb-Mar 45); 24.(FlugmeldeLeit)/Ln.-Rgt. 211 (May 43 – Sep 44); Fallschirmjäger-Rgt. 6 (Jan 44); 2. Fallschirmjäger-Div. (May 44); part of 8. Fallschirmjäger-Div. (Jan 45); Fallschirmjäger-Rgt. 22 (Jan 45); Fallschirmjäger-Rgt. 24 (Feb 45); Fallschirmjäger-Rgt. 32 (Feb 45); Fallschirm-Pi.Btl. 8 (Feb 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.537-39 (19 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Komturhof (GER) ( ?? ) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Silesia S of Schweidnitz (Swidnica). Exact location not determined. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Köngen (GER) (c. 48 41 09 N – 09 21 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 17 km SE of Stuttgart. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Königsberg (GER/RUSS) (today: Kaliningrad) (54 42 18 N – 20 31 05 E) General: Luftwaffe units stationed in and around the former capital of East Prussia but not identifiable with a specific airfield. 9 Apr 45: Königsberg, after a bloody siege that lasted for more than two months, finally capitulated to forces belonging to the Russian 3rd Belorussian Front.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates – not complete). For additional Luftwaffe city garrison units and details, mainly Flak, go to Google and enter: Königsberg site:ww2.dk. Some of the listed Flak and other ground units were in the immediate proximity of the airfield or airfields around the city. Commands (Kommandobehörden, Stäbe): Luftkreiskdo. I (Apr 34 – Feb 38); Luftwaffenkdo. Ostpreussen (K-Ballieth, Feb 38 – Sep 39); Luftgaukdo. I (Aug 38 – Jan 45); Stab/Fliegerführer Ostsee (c.MayAug 41); Stab/Jagdfliegerführer Ostpreussen (K-Seewiesen, c.Sep 44 – Jan 45). Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/27. Flak-Div. (Sep 44 – Jan 45); Stab/11. Flak-Brig. (Jul-Sep 44); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 81 (mid-43 – 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 121 (Jan 45); Stab/Hei.Flak-Abt. 20/I (1943-44); Stab/Hei.Flak-Abt. 27/I (1943-44); Flak-Trsp.Bttr. 12/VII (Jun 43); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 16 (1940-41); Luftschutz-Kp. z.b.V. 1/I (194445); Sprengkommando d.Lw. 1/I ( ? ). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab and components/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 1 (K-Ballieth, 1939-45); Stab III. (Funkh.) and components/Ln.-Rgt. 1 (1939 – Jul 41; K-Kobbelbude, Jul 44 - 1945); elements of Stab IV./Ln.-Rgt. 1 (K-Kobbelbude, Aug 44); V.(Ers.)/Ln.-Rgt. 1 (1942-44); Stab/Ln.-Flugmelde-Rgt. 91 (KSeewiesen, c.Jan 43 – Aug 44); Stab III.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 214 (c.Apr-Jul 43); Stab II.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 224 (c.Jul 43 – Aug 44); Stab III.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 224 (c.Jul 43 – Aug 44); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 260 (Sep 44 – Feb 45); Stab I.(Ln.Betr.)/Ln.-Rgt. 260 (K-Seewiesen, Sep 44 – Feb 45); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 261 (K-Seewiesen, Sep 44 – Feb 45); I.(Funkh.)/Ln.-Rgt. 353 (Nov 44 – Feb 45); Ln.-Abt. 6 (K-Ballieth, Jul 38 – Oct 39); Ln.-Abt. 73 (Feb-Mar 45); Ln.-Abt. 147 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); Ln.-Abt. 171 (Jul-Sep 44); Ln.-Betr.Abt. (mot) z.b.V. 10 (May-Jul 41); 1./Ln.-RV-Abt. (mot) z.b.V. 1 (Jan-Mar 45); Flugmelde-Abt. z.b.V. 12 (K-Ballieth, Oct-Nov 44 – disbanding); Luftgaubereichswerkstatt (N) 1/I (K-Ballieth, ? – Feb 45). Construction (Bau): Stab/Lw.-Bau-Rgt. 3/VII (Nov 41). Supply Services (Nachschubdienste): Flieger-Geräteausgabe- und Sammelstelle 2/XII (Jan-Feb 45); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 10/VI (Jan-Feb 45); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 22/XI (Jan 45). Ground Transport (Transportkolonnen): Kdr.d.Kraftfahrtruppen d.Lw. 2/I (n.d.); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 111/I (1945)?; Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 118/I (1945)?; Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 119/I (1945)?; Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 169/III (1945)?; Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 105/VII (1945); Kfz.Werkstattzug d.Lw. 102/I (Jan 45)? Ground Defense and Security, etc. (Landesschützen, usw.): Transport-Begleit-Kp. d.Lw. 1/I (1944-45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 62/I (Jan 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 46/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 56/VI (Jun - 355 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 297/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 298/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 303/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 307/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 311/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 317/VI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 216/XI (Jan-Feb 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 224/XI (Jun 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 226/XI (Jan 45)?; Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 232/XI (Jun 41). Medical Services (Sanitätsdienste): Lw.-Lazarett 1/I (KDommelkeim, c.1938 – Jan 45); Sanitätsbereitschaft (mot) d.Lw. 1/I (Feb-Mar 45); Sanitätsbereitschaft (mot) d.Lw. 4/XII (Jan-Mar 45). Other (sonstige, verschiedene): elements of Lw.-Berge-Btl. II (Jan-Mar 45). Königsberg-Devau (GER/RUSS) (54 43 30 N – 20 34 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) and factory airfield (Industriehafen) in former East Prussia 4 km ENE of Königsberg (Kaliningrad). History: 1927 listed as a commercial airport (Verkehrsflughafen). 1931 listed as a first-class commercial airport (Flughafen I) with a customs office. 1935 in use by D.L.V. for pilot training. 1938 became a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for DLH workshops. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 915 meters (1100 x 1000 yards). Surface and Runways: deteriorating grass surface that was once firm and well-drained. No paved runway. A perimeter road encircled the airfield. Probably equipped for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: bulk fuel storage was reportedly on the W boundary. Infrastructure: had 1 large and 5 medium hangars in a row along the W corner of the field. Workshops were among the buildings off the NW boundary, these including barracks, admin offices, etc. The station flight control building and control tower were at the NW corner. A branch rail line from Königsberg served the N side of the airfield. Dispersal: at least 8 open aircraft shelters were off the SE boundary (Apr 44). Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: Kurierstaffel 2 (Aug 41); Flugbereitschaft Luftgaukdo. I. (Apr 43); Stab/KG 77 (Jul 43 – Mar 44). School Units: BFS Königsberg-Devau (Nov 39 – Jan 40) then BFS 3 (Jan 40 – Jun 41); FFS B 21 (Nov 43 – Feb 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Königsberg-Devau (1939-45). Kommandant (not complete): Obstlt. Günther Riegels (Mar 43 Sep 43?); Maj. Walter Sieh (Sep 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Nachtjagdraumführer 112 (c.Oct 43 – Apr 44); Flieger-Werkstattzug (mot) 15 (May 41); Auffanglager d.Lw. Königsberg-Devau (Jan 43).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.686-87 (24 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Königsberg-Neuhausen (GER/RUSS) (today, Neuhausen = Guryevsk) (54 47 15 N – 20 37 10 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 13 km NE of Königsberg (Kaliningrad) in East Prussia and 1.2 km NNE of Neuhausen village. History: built 1934-35 and inaugurated as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Used mainly as a pre-war formation station for reconnaissance units, a training field, a supply hub for the northern sector of the Eastern Front, and as a wartime rest and refit center for bomber units. Dimensions: approx. 1235 x 1145 meters (1350 x 1250 yards) and roughly circular in shape. Surface and Runways: artificially drained grass surface. No paved runway. A perimeter road encircled the airfield. Equipped with a beam approach system, perimeter lighting and probably other night landing aids. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the N, SE, S and SW sides of the landing area. Bulk fuel was brought to the airfield by rail from a storage depot 24 km to the W. A large ammunition dump was 1.5 km E of the field. Infrastructure: there were a total of 8 hangars in 3 groups – 2 very large off the NE boundary; 1 very large repair hangar, 2 large regular and 1 medium off the S boundary; 1 very large and 1 large off the SW boundary. All of them had paved aprons and were interconnected. Each hangar group had a motor pool and garages. A number of workshops were in a separate group off the W boundary. There were 2 groups of airfield buildings with offices, barracks, messes, stores, etc., off the NE corner and the other off the S boundary. The flight control building was off the NE corner. A branch spur off the Königsberg-Labiau rail line served the N, W and S boundaries. Dispersal: there were 2 medium open aircraft shelters on the W boundary in Apr 44. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 27 Jan 45: town of Neuhausen and the airfield taken by the Red Army. Operational Units: Fliegerstaffel Neuhausen/Fliegerstaffel 1 Neuhausen (May 34 – Sep 37); Fliegerstaffel 2 Neuhausen (Oct 36 – Sep 37); Fliegerstaffel 3 Neuhausen (Oct 36 – Sep 37); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 120 (Nov 38 – Mar 40); Stab, 1., 2., 3./Aufkl.Gr. 10 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); Stab/LG 1 (Aug-Sep 39); Wekusta 1 Luftflotte 1 (Nov 39 – Feb 40); 4./Aufkl.Gr. 10 (Oct 40 – May 41); II./KG 54 (Jan 42); II./JG 3 (Aug-Sep 42); Stab/KG 1 (Nov 42 – May 43); III./KG 1 (Nov 42 – Jan 43); II./KG 1 (Jan-Apr 43); I./KG 1 (Apr-May 43); Stab/KG 77 (Mar - 357 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 44); III./KG 27 (Mar-May 44); 4.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 122 (Mar-Jun 44); II./KG 27 (Jun-Oct 44). School Units: Schule/FAR 71 (1939); LKS Fürstenfeldbruck/LKS 4 (Nov 39 – Aug 40); Fliegerschule d.Lw. (S) 1 (Sep 40 – Apr 41); III./Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 11 (1941-42). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./KG 27 (May 43 – Jul 44); IV./KG 55 (May – Jul 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Neuhausen (1939); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 2/I (Apr 44 – Feb 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Georg Fitze (Feb 40 - Sep 40); Obstlt. Karl-Friedrich Domke (8 Mar 41 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug 3/I (Jul 39 – c.Mar 42); Koflug 1/I (1943 – c.Mar 45); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 1 (JanMar 43); 3. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 1 (Jan 43); Werft-Abt. 2/I (Dec 44); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 44 (1944); Luftzeuggruppe 1 (c. 1939-44); Lw.Bau-Btl. Neuhausen (1939-40); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 1/VI ( ? – Aug 41); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 138/IV (Jan-Feb 45); Stab/Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 1/I (fall 40 - ? ); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 2/III (Jun 41); Sanitätsbereitschaft (mot) d.Lw. 1/II (Jun 41); Flugzeug-Bergungstrupp 13/XI (May 41). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.749-51 (2 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Königsberg-Neumark (GER) (a.k.a. Chojna) (52 56 30 N – 14 25 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 52 km S of Stettin; airfield 2 km SSW of Königsberg/Neumark. History: built during 1937-38. Used mainly for flight training, but in early 1944 fighter units were transferred here to intercept raids over NE Germany, especially in the Stettin-Berlin area. Dimensions: approx. 1370 x 1000 meters (1500 x 1100 yards) and oval in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No praved runway. A perimeter road encircled the landing area. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, a flare path, a beam approach system and the short form of the visual Lorenz system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in front of the hangars on the N boundary. The ammunition dump was probably off the SE boundary. Infrastructure: there were 6 hangars along the N boundary – 2 very large, 3 large plus 1 large repair hangar, all with interconnected paved aprons. Separate workshop buildings were behind the hangars. The station admin buildings, barracks, messes and other base support and service facilities were all off the N boundary. A number of farm buildings off the SE boundary were reportedly part of the airfield - 358 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 infrastructure. A branch off the Königsberg-Stettin rail line served the buildings on the N boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: II./KG 27 (Aug-Sep 39); III./KG 27 (Sep-Oct 39); elements of III./NJG 5 (1943-44); Stab, II./ZG 26 (Mar-Aug 44); III./ZG 26 (Mar-May 44); I./ZG 26 (May-Aug 44); Stab, I., II./JG 6 (Jul-Sep 44); Stabsstaffel/NJG 1 (Jan – Feb 45); Stabsstaffel/NJG 5 (Jan – Apr 45); NSGr. 30 (Feb-Mar 45). School Units: Schule/FAR 12 (1939 – Oct 41) then FFS A/B 12 (Oct 41 – Jun 43); Ausbildungslehrgang für Kommandeure der Jagd- und Zerstörerverbände (Jun-Sep 44); Verbandsführerschule des General der Jagdflieger (Sep 44 – Jan 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Schulstaffel/NJG 5 (Jun – Dec 44); 3./Erg.Jagdgruppe Süd (Aug-Sep 44); Schulstaffel/NJG 1 (Sep – Dec 44). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Königsberg/Neumark (to c. Sep 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 38/III (to Mar 44); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 19/III Döberitz (1944); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 21/III Frankfurt/Oder (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Oberst Hermann Kuhrt (30 Jun 41 26 Mar 43). Lw. Station Units (on the airfield, in the town or nearby on various dates – not complete): Nachtjagdraumführer 104 (Jul 42 – c.May 44); Koflug 6/IV (Dec 44 – Feb 45); Werft-Abt. 201/I (Dec 44); WerftKp. 13 (n.d.); II.(Tel.Bau)/Ln.-Rgt. 11 (Apr, Jun 43); Kriegsgefangenen-Lager 2 d.Lw. (1944-45); Kriegsgefangenen-Lager 6 d.Lw. (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.688-90 (1 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Konstanz (GER) (47 40 30 N – 09 09 30 E) General: emergency landing ground/landing ground (Notlandeplatz/Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 23 km W of Friedrichshafen on the Bodensee (Lake Constance); airfield 2 km NW of Konstanz. History: listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz) in 1927, then as a secondary airport (Flughafen II) with customs office in 1932. In 1937 the Luftwaffe began using it occasionally. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface with a takeoff/landing run of approx.. 550 meters (600 yards). Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. - 359 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.430 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Körbelitz (GER) (52 10 30 N – 11 47 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Anhalt 12 km NE of Magdeburg. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kornau (GER) (a.k.a. Olszewki) (c. 53 40 N – 20 59 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in East Prussia c. 33 km ESE of Allenstein (Olsztyn). History: no record found of Luftwaffe use prior to January 1945. Operational Units: III./SG 1 (Jan 45)? Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Köslin (GER) (a.k.a. Koszalin) (c. 54 11 25 N – 16 11 11 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania 40 km E of Kolberg (Kolobrzeg). History: laid out in summer 1914. During WW I, it was occupied by an aircraft factory and a pilots' school (Luftverkehrsgesellschaft mbH). 1927 listed as a civil landing ground (Verkehrslandeplatz) with almost no activity and very little infrastructure. Little or no air activity during the war and may have been used for glider training. Surface and Dimensions: grass and sand surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Air Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug 2/I (Feb-Mar 45); 8.(Flum.Res.)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 3 (Jan 43); Fluko Köslin. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Köthen (GER) (51 43 30 N – 11 58 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 52 km SSE of Magdeburg and 17 km WSW of Dessau in Anhalt; airfield 2 km S of the town of Köthen. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). Taken over by the Luftwaffe and between 1936 and 1938 and developed into its main signals experimental station. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1000 meters (1300 x 1100 yards) and irregular in shape.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Surface and Runways: firm, level grass surface. No paved runway. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting, flare path and a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstand in front of the hangars on the N boundary. A small ammunition dump was on the S boundary. Infrastructure: the hangar complex projected out on to the landing area at the center of the N boundary and consisted of 5 hangars – 4 very large plus 1 large repair type, all with paved aprons and all fronted by a continuous servicing hardstand. One of the very large hangars was mainly used for repairs and another for housing experimental aircraft. Separate workshops, garages and the station motor pool were behind the hangars. Echeloned behind these were the station admin offices, barracks, messes and sundry service and support buildings. The flight control building was in the middle of the N boundary facing the flight line. Rail sidings served the N end of the airfield. Dispersal: there were a total of 7 large open aircraft shelters – 4 along the N boundary and 3 off the SW corner. Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Köthen/West (51 44 30 N – 11 57 30 E), satellite and dispersal field 2.5 km NW of Köthen airfield. Under cultivation in Aug 42 and no record of Luftwaffe use. Remarks: 20 Jul 44: Köthen bombed by 69 B-17 Fortresses. 16 Aug 44: airfield bombed by 71 B-24 Liberators. 9 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 88s and 1 x Ju 188 destroyed, plus 2 x Bf 109s, 1 x Fw 190, 2 x Ju 188s, 1 x Ju 52 and 2 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 25 Feb 45: low-level attack by approx. 20 VIII Fighter Command P-51s – 3 x Ju 88s destroyed and 1 x He 111 P-10 from Fliegerzielstaffel 3 damaged (German sources). The P-51s claimed 1 x He 111 and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Bf 109s, 1 x He 111 and 1 x Ju 88 damaged. Operational Units: KGr. 100 (Nov-Dec 39); Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 2/4 (Aug 41 – Dec 43); 6.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Sep 44); Schleppgruppe 1 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); 5./NJG 11 (Dec 44 – Mar 45). School Units: Peilflugleiter-Lehrgänge Köthen (1944-45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Köthen (1939-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 17/IV (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/III (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Hptm. Adolf Koch (15 Aug 40 - 28 May 41). - 361 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Lw. Station Units (on the airfield, in the town or nearby on various dates – not complete): 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KGr. 100 (Nov-Dec 39); Werft-Abt. 24/III (1944-45); Werft-Abt. 25/III (May 44); le.Hei.FlakBttr. 30/IV (1943-45); 8.(Fernverb.Betr.Pers.)/Ln.-Rgt. 130 (Oct-Nov 44); Stab/Ln.-Versuchs-Rgt. (Apr 38 – 1945); Stab I./Ln.-VersuchsRgt. (Apr 38 – 1945); Stab II./Ln.-Versuchs-Rgt. (Apr 38 – 1945); Stab IV./Ln.-Versuchs-Rgt. (Apr 38 – 1945); Ln.-Abt. 42 (c.Aug-Dec 44); Ln.-Abt. 100 (Sep 38 – c.Dec 39); Ln.-Lehr-u.Versuchs-Abt. (Oct 37 – Mar 38); Ln.-Betr.Abt. (mot) z.b.V. 15 (c.Apr-May 41); Stab, 5., 6. and 7./Ln.-Flugmelde-Abt. (E) z.b.V. 21 (Feb 45); 1., 2. Ln.Spezial-Ers.Kp./Ln.-Ers.-u.Ausb.Rgt. 1 (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.691-93 (5 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Köthen-Klepzig (GER) (51 44 30 N – 12 00 50 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) 17 km WSW of Dessau in Anhalt; airfield 3 km NE of Köthen. History: 1927 listed as a Notlandeplatz. No record of Luftwaffe use and the area was under cultivation in summer 1942. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface of unknown measurements. Infrastructure: none mentioned. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.969 (1 Aug 42); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kottenhain (GER) (a.k.a. Blankenhain) (50 50 30 N – 11 23 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Thuringia 17 km SSW of Weimar. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Krakow am See (GER) (c. 53 39 07 N – 12 15 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Mecklenburg 15 km SSE of Güstrow. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Krefeld (GER) (51 20 24 N – 06 34 21 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates and not specifically identified with the airfield – not complete): Antiaircraft (Flak): Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 5 (as Flakgruppe Krefeld, 194142); Flak-Abt.: s.181 (1942); s.264 (1942); s.383 (1942); Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 250 (1941-43);

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Heimat-Flak: le.27/VI (Dec 42 - ?); le.28/VI (Dec 42 - ?); le.61/VI (Feb 43 - ?); s.201/VI (Feb 43 - ?); s.202/VI (Feb 43 - ?); s.203/VI (Feb 43 - ?); s.210/VI (Jul 43 - ?); s.211/VI (Jul 43 - ?); s.212/VI (Jul 43 - ?); s.213/VI (Jul 43 - ?); s.225/VI (Jul 43 - ?); s.227/VI (Dec 42 - ?); s.228/VI (Dec 42 - ?); s.229/VI (Dec 42 - ?); s.230/VI (Dec 42 - ?); s.231/VI (Dec 42 - ?); s.238/VI (Feb 43 - ?); s.238/VI (Feb 43 - ?); s.239/VI (Feb 43 - ?); s.240/VI (Feb 43 - ?). Krefeld (GER) (51 21 40 N – 06 37 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 18.5 km NW of Düsseldorf in North Rhine – Westphalia; airfield 5 km NE of Krefeld. History: 1927 Verkehrslandeplatz classified as a (civil landing ground) and in use by the Luftwaffe in 1937 for the training of reservists. Dimensions: approx. 1150 x 825 meters (1250 x 900 yards) with an oval shape. Surface and Runways: level grass turf kept in good condition. Equipped with perimeter and obstruction lights for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling point were in front of the hangars and underground bulk storage at the NE corner of the airfield. Ammunition storage was along the E boundary. Infrastructure: had 6 hangars on the S boundary including a repair hangar. All of the hangars had paved aprons and were camouflaged with netting. Station HQ, barracks, admin buildings and some stores buildings were grouped just behind the hangars on the S boundary. A special branch rail line served the buildings on the S boundary. Dispersal: 3 dispersal areas – Northeast with 2 large and 7 small aircraft shelters, Southeast with 6 small and Northwest with 4 large and 10 small. All of the shelters were open and covered with camouflage netting. Defenses: had 2 heavy Flak positions with 6 guns each and 8 light Flak positions in mid-August 1943. Remarks: Krefeld city was bombed numerous times by the RAF but no specific attacks appear to have been airmed at the airfield. 5 Feb 45: airfield ordered completely evacuated (but no mention of demolition). 2 Mar 45: Krefeld taken by Allied forces. Operational Units: I./JG 21 (Dec 39); I./JG 1 (Dec 39 – Jan 40); III./ZG 26 (Dec 39 – Jan 40); Stab/JG 27 (Jan-Mar 40); I./JG 27 (JanMar 40, Oct 40); 9.(H)/LG 2 (Mar-May 40); I./JG 51 (Mar-May 40, May-Jun 41); Stab, II./KG 27 (May-Jun 40); Stab/JG 52 (Nov 40 – Jan 41); I./JG 52 (Nov-Dec 40); I./JG 53 (Dec 40 – Apr 41); II./JG 51 (Jun 41); Stab/JG 51 (Jun 41); parts of III./NJG 1 (1945).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Flieger-Ers.Btl. VI (c.Jan 43 – early 44); Erg.St./JG 52 (Oct 40 – Jan 41). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. Krefeld (to mid-1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 31/VI (mid-1943 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 11/VI Essen-Mülheim (1944). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. d.Lw. 1/VI (Oct 44); Stab IV.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 201 (Berg, Oct 42 – Aug 44?); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 51/XI (to Oct 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 349/VI (to Oct 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.326-29 (27 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Krefeld-Linn (GER) (51 19 40 N – 06 38 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 18.5 km NW of Düsseldorf in North Rhine – Westphalia; airfield 6 km E of Krefeld, 4 km SSE of Krefeld airfield and 1.2 km S of Linn village. History: used by fighters in 1940. Subsequently deactivated and returned to agricultural use until fall 1944 when the landing area was rehabilitated and once again in use by fighters. Dimensions: 870 x 230 meters (950 x 250 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface (no paved runway). Fuel and Ammunition: available as needed. Infrastructure: had a paved hangar apron, according to German sources, but Allied photo reconnaissance was not able to detect any infrastructure here. Nearest rail connection at Linn. Dispersal: no organized dispersal or aircraft shelters. Remarks: see under Krefeld. Operational Units: I./JG 26 (Sep-Oct 44). Station Commands: operated as a satellite of the main airfield at Krefeld. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.349 (8 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Kreuzbruch (GER) (a.k.a. Liebenwalde) (52 49 20 N – 13 26 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Brandenburg 36 km N of Berlin, 6 km SSE of Liebenwalde and 2 km SSE of Kreuzbruch. History: in existence since 1937 and used as a practice field for elementary flight trainers. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1190 x 1650 meters (1300 x 1800 yards). No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: had 2 groups of refueling points on the S boundary and 1 group on the W boundary. Infrastructure: there was 1 small hut on the S boundary that may have been used as a workshop. No accommodations of other buildings. A branch rail track off the Liebenwalde-Berlin line served the S boundary. Operational Units: NJGr. 10 (Mar-Apr 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 11 and FFS A/B 11 (Schönwalde). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.703 (26 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kreuznach-Ippesheim (GER): see Ippesheim. Kruft (GER) (50 23 06 N – 07 21 45 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in RhinelandPfalz 17 km WNW of Koblenz and 1.6 km E of the small town of Kruft. History: training field for primary glider. Surface and Dimensions: level grass surface measuring approx. 730 x 410 meters (800 x 450 yards) and having an irregular shape. Infrastructure: a group of buildings off the N boundary may have been billets. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Flak-Rgt. 61 (Jan 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.592 (4 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Krumbach (GER) (48 14 46 N – 10 21 59 E) ) General: practice field (Arbeitsplatz) for gliders in Bavaria 42 km WSW of Augsburg and 34 km SE of Ulm. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by Luftwaffe powered aircraft found. Surface and Dimensions: open meadowland. Infrastructure: none noted. School Units: glider Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 23, FFS A/B 23 then FFS A 23 (Kaufbeuren) (1939-45). [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kubitzer Bay (GER): often appears in Allied documents in reference to Parow seaplane station - see there. Kummersfeld (GER): see Neumünster – Klein-Kummersfeld. Kunsebeck (GER) (52 01 30 N – 08 23 30 E). General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 13 km NNE of Gütersloh airfield and immediately S of the village of Kunsebeck. History: no known activity. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.633 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Küpper (GER): see Sagan-Küpper. Kurnach (GER) (49 51 00 N – 10 05 50 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 14 km ENE of Würzburg and 4 km E of Kurnach. History: laid out 1934-35 with - 365 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 measurments of 825 x 775 meters (900 x 850 yards). No record of any Luftwaffe units being stationed there and after mid-1940 it was turned into a large munitions storage area. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.454 (25 Feb 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kusel (GER) (c. 49 33 03 N – 07 23 53 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Rhineland-Pfalz 30 km NW of Kaiserslautern. History: laid out in the late 1930’s. May have been used as a refueling field during the campaign in the West that began on 10 May 1940. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station and Town Units (on various dates – not complete): 3., 4./Festungs-Flak-Rgt. 33(v) (Jul 38 – Aug 39); Res.Festungs-Flak-Abt. 331(v) (Aug 39 – 1940/41); le.Flak-Abt. 993(v) (Apr-May 41)? [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Kussfeld (GER) (a.k.a. Stare Kusy? Nowe Kusy?) (c. 54 02 N – 19 36 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in East Prussia c. 18 km SE of Elbing and c. 4.5 km SW of Paslek/Pasłęk (Preussisch Holland). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Küstrin (GER) (a.k.a. Kostrzyn) (52 36 30 N – 14 40 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) 27 km NNE of Frankfurt/Oder; landing ground located 3.25 km NE of Küstrin. History: 1927 listed as a Notlandeplatz. 1938 in Luftwaffe service as a Feldflugplatz but no record of its use has been found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 915 x 460 meters (1000 x 500 yards). Infrastructure: none reported. Remarks: 12 Mar 45: Küstrin taken by Soviet forces. Operational Units: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.969 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

L Labiau (GER): see Eichwalde. Lachen-Speyerdorf (GER) (49 19 50 N - 08 12 50 E).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) later upgraded to an airfield (Fliegerhorst) 26 km SW of Mannheim in Rheinland-Pfalz, 6 km ESE of Neustadt and immediately SE of Speyerdorf near the village of Lachen. History: in existence in 1917 as a training airfield. 1934 used for pre-flight glider training. 1939 now as an Einsatzhafen I (operational airfield, class I). An important wartime training airfield. Used as a civil/general aviation airfield after the war. Wartime Code name: “Bode”. Allied code name: “Y 68”. Dimensions: approx. 1420 x 825 meters (1550 x 900 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface on sandy sub-soil. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were in the W corner, and ammunition storage was believed to be in the trees off the E corner. Infrastructure: there were 4 large and medium hangars dispersed around the landing area and all had paved aprons. Extensive billeting and admin buildings in groups at the SE corner and on the W boundary. Separate workshops were adjacent to the hangars. A branch rail line served the S boundary and the buildings at the SE corner of the airfield. Dispersal: had an East dispersal with at least 6 aircraft bays cut into a woods running along a taxi track. Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 27 May 44: Lachen bombed by 18 B-17 Fortresses as a target of opportunity. 21 Jul 44: Lachen bombed by 12 B-17 Fortresses as a target of opportunity. 31 Jul 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 3 x unidentified aircraft destroyed. 3 Oct 44: airfield and other targets at Lachen bombed by 143 8th Air Force B-24 Liberators. Operational Units: I./ZG 2 (Oct – Nov 1939); I./JG 52 (May 1940); III./KG 53 (Aug-Sep 44); I./JG 4 (Sep 44); Stab, 1./NAGr. 13 (SepNov 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz (gliders) for FFS A/B 116 then FFS A 116 (Göppingen) (1941-44); Jagdfliegervorschule 2 (1940 – Nov 42); Jagdfliegerschule 6 (Nov 42 – Mar 43); Stab and I./JG 106 (Mar 43 – Jun 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Lachen-Speyerdorf (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 28/XII (Mar 40); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 33/XII (Jan 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 3/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 19/VII (Jun 44 – Mar 45). - 367 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Units (on various dates on the airfield, in the city or nearby – not complete): Stab/IV. Flakkorps (Edenkoben, Oct 44 – Mar 45); Koflug 12/VII (Neustadt/Weinstrasse Sep 44 – Mar 45); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 53; 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./ZG 52; Ln.-Abt. (mot) 104 (Edenkoben, Oct 44 - Mar 45); 5./gem.Flak-Abt. 491(o) (May 44); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 9/XII (Neustadt/Weinstrasse – Oct, Dec 44); Kfz.Werkstattzug d.Lw. 107/XII (Diedesfeld – ? - Dec 44); FliegerUntersuchungsstelle 2/XIII (Neustadt/Weinstrasse, Oct 44); Stab/Lw.Berge-Btl. IV (Oct-Nov 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.232-35 (12 Mar 44 updated to 9 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ladbergen (GER) (52 08 10 N – 07 41 10 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 26.5 km SW of Osnabrück and 21 km NNE of Münster; airfield 4 km W of Ladbergen village. History: used as a glider field. Surface and Dimensions: rough grass surface measuring approx. 950 x 190 meters (1040 x 210 yards). Construction apparently abandoned after strip leveled. Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar at the W end. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.592 (15 Aug 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lägerdorf (GER) (c. 53 53 03 N – 09 34 56 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Schleswig-Holstein 7 km SE of Itzehoe. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Lagerlechfeld (GER): see Lechfeld. Lahr (GER) (48 21 10 N – 07 49 40 E) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 25 km SSE of Strasbourg and 41 km N of Freiburg; airfield 3 km W of Lahr. History: wartime use as a practice field for single-engine trainers. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 2 (Luxeuil) (Jun 41 – 1944). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lampertheim (GER) (49 35 30 N – 08 25 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Hesse 12 km N of Mannheim; airfield 2.5 km W of Lampertheim. History: no

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 record of use by the Luftwaffe of this small grass surfaced landing ground measuring approx. 455 x 455 meter (500 x 500 yards). Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.454 (7 Apr 40); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Landau/Isar (GER) (a.k.a. Ganacker, Landau an der Isar) (48 43 30 N – 12 41 45 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Bavaria 101 km NE of München (Munich) and 23 km SSE of Straubing; airfield 6 km N of Landau. History: 1927 emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). Wartime use mainly as a training field. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 960 x 960 meters (1050 x 1050 yards) and square in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: had 3 small hangars on the N boundary. There was a large barracks complex off the N boundary, further barrack accommodations to the NE, plus a few buildings off the S boundary on the outskirts of Ganacker village. A branch rail line probably served the S, W and N sides of the airfield. Dispersal: 3 dispersal areas, Northwest, North and South, with a total of 18 open aircraft shelters, mostly large. Remarks: 16 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 75 destroyed or damaged, nearly all Bf 109s and Fw 190s. 17 Apr 45: : low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 34 destroyed or damaged, almost all Bf 109s (17) and Fw 190s (15). 24 Apr 45: bombed by 172 9th AAF bombers. Operational Units: III./JG 54 (Apr-May 44); IV./JG 54 (May-Jun 44); 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 21 (May-Jun 44)?; 5.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 41 (May-Jun 44)?; 3./Gruppe Süd (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (Aug 44); Stab, I./KG(J) 55 (Oct 44 – Apr 45). School Units: FFS C Landau (1938 – Oct 39) but actual location at Erding; Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 43 (Prossnitz) (1939-40); Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 121 then FFS A 121 (Straubing) (1940-45); Stab and II./JG 101 (Jul 44 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 18/XII Straubing (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 34/VII Straubing (JunOct 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 208/VII (or E(v) 208/VIII?) (Nov 44 – May 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt.(v) 114/XII (1944-45); Werft-Zug 6/VII (1944-45); le.Alarm-Flak-Battr. 42/VII (one Zug) (1944-45); Lw.-Bau-Ers.Btl. VII (1943 – Mar 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.236-37 (30 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Landau/Pfalz (GER) (a.k.a. Landau in der Pfalz) (49 10 35 N – 08 08 05 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Rhineland-Pfalz 30 km NW of Karlsruhe; airfield 3 km S of Landau. History: set up in the late 1930’s. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Air Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station and Town Units (on various dates – not complete): 3., 4./Festungs-Flak-Rgt. 34(v) (Jul 38 – 1940/41); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 45 (mot.) (1944-45); Res.Festungs-Flak-Abt. 341(v) (Aug 39 – 1940); le.Flak-Abt. 842(v) (1945); le.Flak-Abt. 923(v) (1945); Kfz.Werkstattzug d.Lw. 103/XII ( ? – Dec 44). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Landsberg/Lech (GER) (48 04 20 N – 10 55 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 50 km WSW of Munich in Bavaria; airfield 4 km NE of Landsberg and just W of the village of Penzing. Paved hangar apron and taxiway, and possibly a paved runway. History: construction began in 1935 and it was ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Served as a major bomber base to Jun 40 and then for resting, refitting and reequiping bomber units during the war years. From fall 1943, Landsberg became a parking area for large numbers of Do 217 bombers that had apparently become surplus to the needs of the Luftwaffe because the engines were removed from the majority of them. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 825 meters (1300 x 900 yards). Surface and Runways: grass with clay on gravel subsoil. Had a single concrete runway measuring 1190 x 50 meters (1300 by 55 yards) aligned ENE/WSW. A perimeter road and taxiways connected the runway with the rest of the airfield. Fuel and Ammunition: both were available. Two groups of refueling points were along the S boundary and on a servicing hardstand in front of the hangars. Ammunition storage bunkers were along the S boundary. Infrastructure: there were 3 very large flight hangars, 1 large flight hangar, 2 medium flight hangars and 1 very large repair hangar on the N side of the airfield with paved aprons and numerous workshop buildings adjacent to them. The motor pool and garages were off the extreme NW corner of the field. Station admin buildings, barracks, messes and other facilities were grouped behind the hangars. A light branch rail line served the buildings at the NW corner and the ammunition dump on the S boundary. - 370 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dispersal: 2 dispersal areas – Southwest and Northwest with a total of 9 open aircraft shelters and 2 covered aircraft shelters. Defenses: Remarks: 18 Mar 44: bombed by 75 to 100 B-17 Fortresses. 5 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51 Mustangs – claimed 3 x Bf 110s, 4 x Ju 88s, 1 x He 111, 6 x Do 217s and 1 x Fw 200 destroyed, plus 4 x Bf 110s, 3 x Ju 88s, 1 x He 111, 30 x Do 217s, 2 x Fw 44s and 1 x DFS 230 damaged. 24 Apr 44: bombed by 57 B-17s. 21 Jul 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 3 x Ju 88s destroyed and 10 x Ju 88s damaged. 15 Jan 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Fw 190, 3 x Bf 110s and 5 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Bf 110s and 7 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 16 Feb 45: low-level attack – 15 x Ar 96, 3 x Bü 131 and 2 x Si 204 destroyed, 2 x Bf 110 G-4 and 1 x Si 204 D-1 from III./Erg.JG 2 damaged; 8 hangars, buildings and barracks badly damaged and 10 more lightly damaged; runway and landing area heavily cratered. (German report) 28 Feb 45: low-level attack – 1 x Bf 110 G-4 from III./Erg.JG 2 damaged. 9 Apr 45: bombed by 62 B-24 Liberators. Operational Units: Stab, I./KG 255 (Mar 37 – Apr 39); Stab/KG 51 (May 39 – Jun 40, Aug-Nov 44); I./KG 51 (May-Aug 39); III./KG 27 (Oct 39); III./KG 51 (Nov 39 – Jun 40); I./SKG 210 (Oct 41 – Jan 42); II./KG 54 (Nov-Dec 41); 7.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 12 (Jan 42); Stab, I., II./ZG 2 (Mar-Jun 42); I./KG 55 (Jul-Aug 43); Gefechtsverband Sigel (c.AugSep 43); 2./NAGr. 13 (Aug-Sep 44); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 33 (Sep 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz (gliders) for LKS Fürstenfeldbruck/LKS 4 (1937-45); Arbeitsplatz for BFS Neuburg then BFS 2 (Neuburg) (193842); II./NJG 101 (Nov 44 – Feb 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./KG 55 (Oct 40 – Mar 41); Erg.St./KG 40 (Jun – Aug 41); IV.(Erg.)/KG 40 (Jun-Aug 44); 9./Erg.JG 2 (Nov 44 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Landsberg; Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 16/VII (c. Mar 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/VII Lechfeld (Apr-Oct 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 214/XII (c.Oct 44 – c.Apr 45). Kommandant (not complete): Obstlt. Wilhelm von Heinz (17 Oct 42 ? ); Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Landsberg/Lech (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 11/VII (Apr 41 – Apr 45); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 51; 7. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 51 (1939 – Jun 40); 3. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 40; Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 12/VII (1944-45); III. - 371 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (Ausb.Abt.f.Ln.Helferinnen)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 7 (1942-44); Fluko Landsberg; Lw.-Bau-Btl. 26/VII (1940); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 27/VII (1940); E-Hafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 3/VII; Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 115/VII (1944-45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 116/XIII (summer 44); Lw.San.Abt. 11/VII (Apr 41 – Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257 p.1276 (1943); A5258 pp.238-40 (17 Jul 44); A5265 p.159 (Feb 46); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Landsberg-Ost (GER) (48 04 20 N – 10 57 10 E) General: satellite airfield or dispersal airfield (Ausweichplatz) for Landsberg/Lech airfield and located 5.5 km ENE of Landsberg and 2 km ESE of the nearby village of Penzing. History: laid out in summer 1944. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1050 x 870 meters (1150 x 950 yards) and triangular in shape. Infrastructure: none. Dispersal: had an East and South dispersal with a total of 18 aircraft bays cut into woods on E boundary and off the S corner. Remarks: Sep 44: the landing area was elaborately camouflaged to represent cultivated fields. 9 Apr 45: bombed by 33 B-24 Liberators. Operational Units: see Landsberg/Lech. Station Commands: see Landsberg/Lech. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.242 (17 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Landsberg/Warthe (GER) (a.k.a. (Gorzów Wielkopolski) (c. 52 44 N - 15 14 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Brandenburg c. 62 km NE of Frankfurt/Oder. History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use during the war. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Landshut (GER): see Ergolding. Landshut-Lutzenhof (GER) (48 33 45 N – 12 12 30 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria (Bayern) 53.5 km ESE of Ingolstadt airfield, 5 km ENE of Landshut and 2.8 km E of Ergolding airfield. History: said to have existed before the war. Used during the war years for glider training. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 915 x 365 meters (1000 x 400 yards). No paved runways. Infrastructure: no hangers or workshops. Small groups of buildings off the SW and NW boundaries were apparently used for accommodations. Nearest rail connection in Landshut. Dispersal: woods along the SE boundary could be used to park aircraft.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.243 (29 Sep 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Langelsheim (GER) (51 56 04 N – 10 19 53 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Lower Saxony 7 km WNW of Goslar. History: an alternate landing ground or satellite for Goslar airfield which lay just to the E. Listed as operational in Feb 45. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Langen (GER) (49 57 35 N – 08 39 00 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Hesse 17 km S of Frankfurt/Main, 12.5 km NNE of Darmstast-Griesheim airfield and .8 km SW of the village of Egelsbach. History: laid out in fall 1944 and by Nov 44 it was serviceable and active. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 915 x 412 meters (1000 x 450 yards) and irregular in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: none. Nearest rail connection at Egelsbach. Dispersal: aircraft parked along the edge of a woods on the NW boundary. Remarks: none. Operational Units: 4./JG 4 (Sep 44). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.241 (9 Dec 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Langenau (GER) (today: Langowo) (51 11 30 N – 17 05 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Silesia 10 km NNE of Breslau (Wroclaw) and 1.6 km SSW of the village of Langenau. History: built in the late 1930’s, used by bombers during the campaign in Poland and then as a practice field for trainers. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1280 x 1050 meters (1400 x 1150 yards) and roughly “L” shaped. No paved runway. Equipped with perimeter lighting. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points and fuel storage were on the N boundary and off the SW corner. A smqall ammunition dump was off the W boundary. Infrastructure: there were 4 large hangars off the NW boundary with paved aprons. Just W of the hangars was a group of buildings that were probably used as motor pool garages and warehouses. Another

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 block of buildings in the same area housed offices and possibly served as quarters for senior personnel. A cluster of small sheds were in the same area. The men stationed at Langenau were probably billeted in the village and in nearby Pappelhof. The Breslau-Trebnitz rail line passed 1.2 km E of the airfield. Remarks: 1942-44: reportedly developed into a factory airfield (Industrieplatz) for use as a repair center for the Junkers aircraft manufacturing firm. Operational Units: Stab, I., III./KG 4 (Aug-Sep 39). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS Breslau-Schöngarten/LKS 5 (193944). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) z.b.V. 128 (26 Aug 39 – c.Feb 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.697-98 (26 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Langendiebach (GER) (50 10 00 N – 08 58 00 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 22 km E of Frankfurt/M. in Hesse, 4.8 km NE of Hanau and 1.6 km WSW of the village of Langendiebach. History: construction began in 1937 and flying operations began a year later although construction work continued to 1939. To summer 1940, Langendiebach was home to bomber and long-range reconnaissance units, then by glider-towing training and replacement units to 1944. Night fighter units moved in during the seond half of 1944. Dimensions: 1370 x 1370 meters (1,500 x 1,500 yards). Runway: grass surface with paved hangar apron and perimeter road along E and S boundaries. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel, oil, water and communications available. Infrastructure: the building area was in the shape of an inverted “V” and consisted of 6 large hangars, a number of separate repair workshops, flying control and tower (Flugleitung), barrack blocks, messes, station HQ, admin and supply buildings and the base dispensary. Small blocks of barrack huts were located off the E boundary and the SE corner of the airfield, and a further barrack camp with 22 buildings and huts was 3.2 km to the SSW on the outskirts of Hanau. A railway spur was built along the W boundary and another spur ran into the hangar and building area. Dispersal: blast bays in a woods off the S boundary with more and more being added all the time. Defenses: well defended by fall 1944 but specifics lacking. Remarks: Aug 40: Leithorst Langendiebach had a normal station complement of 112 officers and officials (Beamten) with 1,107 NCOs and men in Aug 40 and this was probably its peak wartime population. - 374 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Mid-1943 – mid-1944: average station complement approx. 500 Luftwaffe flying, ground and signals personnel, 100-200 civilian base personnel, a Flakzug (AA platoon) with 3 x 2.0-cm guns manned by 40 Luftwaffenhelferen (16-year-old male Air Force assistants) and a civilian base guard force of 20 men armed with pistols. 10 Nov 44: bombed by 229 B-24 Liberators on receipt of photo recon intelligence that the runway had been extended 300 meters to accommodate Me 262 jets. This and subsequent attacks destroyed some 20% of the buildings and facilities, destroyed the aircraft dispersal areas and badly cratered the runways. Russia POWs were brought in from nearby Aussenstelle Langendiebach/SS-Sonderlager Hinzert to fill craters and to locate and remove UXBs (unexploded bombs). Nevertheless, by January 1945 Langendiebach was essentially unserviceable and remained that way to the end of the war. Operational Units: I./KG 155 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); I./KG 55 (May-Oct 39); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Oct 39 – May 40); Wekusta 51 (Oct 39 – Jun 40); Aufkl.St.(F)/I. Flakkorps (Dec 39 – May 40); Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 2/13 (1940); I./ZG 26 (Mar-May 40); 1. DFS 230 Staffel (Apr-Jun 42); Wekusta 51 (May 40); 1. (DFS) Staffel/VIII. Fliegerkorps (May-Jun 42); IV./LLG 1 (Jan 43, Apr 43 – Jan 44); 2.(DFS)/Schleppgruppe 1 (Nov-Dec 43); II./NJG 3 (Mar-May 44); III./NJG 2 (Mar-Sep 44); part of I./JG 301 (May-Jun 44); I./NJG 4 (Aug 44 – Jan 45); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 121 (Sep-Nov 44); Flugzeugschleuse Langendiebach. School Units: Fliegerschule d.Lw. (S) 1 (Apr 41 – Apr 42). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Gruppe (S) 1 (Apr 42 – Sep 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Langendiebach (1940); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 31/XII (Jan 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 6/XII (Apr-Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 22/VII (Jun 44 – Mar 45). Kommandant (not complete): Maj. Gustav Müldner (Sep 42 ? ) 12/42. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Langendiebach (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 3/XII (Apr 41 – Mar 42); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 55 (May-Oct 39); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 55 (May-Oct 39); Werft-Abt. (v) 116/XII (Aug 44, Jan 45); Werft-Abt. d.Lw. 8/XII (Oct 44); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 987 (Sep-Nov 44); Lw.-Bau-Rgt. Langendiebach (1940); Lw.-Bau-Gerätezug 9/XII (Oct 39); Lw.-BauGerätezug 10/XII (Oct 39); Nachschub-Kp. d.Lw. 4/XII (1939 – Aug 40); Nachschubkolonnen-Abt. d.Lw. 1/XIV (Marköbel – Dec 44); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 128/VI (Dec 44); Trsp.Kol. d.Lw. 131/XI (Marköbel – Dec 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 162/XIII (1944); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 275/XI (Dec 44); Erprobungsstelle d.Lw. Langendiebach (Aug 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.248-50 (7 Dec 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site fliegerhorste.de] - 375 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45

Langenhagen (GER): see Hannover-Langenhagen. Langenhanshagen (GER) (c. 54 17 07 N – 12 39 52 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Mecklenburg 25 km WSW of Stralsund. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Langensalza (GER) (a.k.a. Bad Langensalza) (51 07 30 N – 10 37 40 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 86 km SE of Kassel and 30 km NW of Erfurt in Thuringia; airfield 2.5 km NNW of the town. History: a landing ground from at least 1927, ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936 and became operational in 1938 after much construction and building. Used by dive-bomber (Stuka) units, an elementary flight school and a night fighter unit before and during the war. On the E side of the town of Langensalza and not far from the airfield, Junkers Flugzeug- und Motorenwerke AG set up a factory in spring 1944 for the production of Ju 88 and Fw 190 fuselages that at peak had some 750 German workers and 1,458 concentration camp inmates doing forced labor in the factory. Dimensions: approx. 825 x 1000 meters (900 x 1100 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface. There was a concrete starting platform on the E boundary which led to a prepared strip from the W boundary that gave an E/W take-off and landing run of approx. 1600 meters (1750 yards). Additionally, a narrow wedge-shaped starting platform in the SE corner projected into the center of the landing area giving a NW/SE run of approx. 1190 meters (1300 yards). Equipped with perimeter lighting for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: fuel was readily available and there were two ammunition dumps at the N and S ends of the airfield. Infrastructure: had 2 very large and 4 large hangars plus 1 large repair hangar, all with paved hangar aprons. Station HQ, workshops, admin offices, barracks and flying control were all grouped in the hangar area at the SE end of the airfield. The motor pool, garages, stores buildings and a second cluster of barracks were all in a separate group approx. 2000 meters (2200 yards) SE of the landing area. A branch rail line served the hangar and building area at the SE corner of the field. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities (5 Jul 44), but shortly thereafter an East Dispersal with 7 aircraft hardstands was constructed on the edge of a woods.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: not noted. Remarks: No evidence found of attacks on this airfield by Allied 4-engine bombers. 12 May 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed and 1 more damaged. 11 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 7 x Fw 190s destroyed and 2 x Fw 190s plus 1 x Ju 188 damaged. 8 Apr 45: airfield occupied by an USAAF engineer aviation unit after falling to U.S. forces without resistance a day or two before. Operational Units: II./St.G. 163 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); III./St.G. 2 (MayAug 39); III./KG 28 (Jun-Jul 40); II./KG 76 (Jun-Jul 40); I./NJG 2 (Mar-May 44). School Units: FFS A/B 42 (Sep 42 – c. Sep 43). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Langensalza (Aug 39 – c. Feb 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 17/IV (c. Feb 40 - ? ); as Fl.H. Langensalza (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 34/IV (Dec 43); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 44/XI (1943-44)?; Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 30/III Kölleda (1944-45). Kommandant (not complete): Obstlt. Hans-Joachim Wiedorn-Roy ( ? - 17 Oct 42). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none found. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.330-33 (5 Jul 44, revised 18 Dec 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Langenwinkel (GER) (48 21 10 N – 07 49 40 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemburg 26 km SSE of Strasbourg, 3 km W of Lahr and immediately NE of Langenwinkel village. History: used in spring 1944 for glider training. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 640 x 160 meters (700 x 175 yards). Infrastructure: had 1 small hangar and 1 workshop-type building on the E boundary. Operational Units: none. Station Commands: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.431 (8 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Langeoog (GER) (53 43 40 N – 07 28 30 E) General: landing ground (Feldflugplatz) on the island of the same name 47 km NW of Wilhelmshaven in Lower Saxony; airfield 1 km S of the village. History: classed as an airport in 1932 (Flughafen II). Taken over by the Luftwaffe c. 1938 and was still under construction in 1939 as a fighter airstrip and first used in Jun 41. Had very little wartime use and rarely were more than 3 or 4 aircraft seen there at one time. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 1000 meters (1100 x 1100 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface on mostly reclaimed land. No paved runway. Ladder-type servicing hardstands along NW - 377 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 and SE boundaries with taxiways and perimeter tracks connecting them to other parts of the landing area. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points and storage tanks located at both hardstand servicing areas. Ammunition dump 1.6 km NNE of the landing area. Infrastructure: had 1 medium-size repair hangar off the NW corner. Station HQ, barracks and offices outside the NW corner. A light rail spur connected the harbor to the landing ground along its E boundary. Dispersal: 2 areas – Southeast Dispersal and North Dispersal with a total of 6 large covered, 12 large open and 7 small covered aircraft shelters. Defenses: had 3 light Flak positions and several machine gun posts in Dec 43. Remarks: no significant Allied air attacks on the landing ground noted. Operational Units: parts of I./JG 52 (Jul-Aug 41). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./Minensuchgruppe 1 (Oct 43 – mid-1944). Station Units: Fl.Pl.Kdo. C 13/XI (1942 – c.Dec 43); Flugplatzkdo. Langeoog of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/XI Marx (1944); Flugplatzkdo. Langeoog of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 12/XI Wittmundhafen (1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none found. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.334-35 (14 Jan 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Langhermsdorf (GER) (a.k.a. Urzuty) (c. 51 48 N – 15 24 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Silesia c. 22 km NE of Sagan (Zagan). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lärz (GER) (a.k.a. Rechlin-Lärz, Rechlin/Süd) (53 18 25 N – 12 44 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 97 km NNW of Berlin, 44 km SW of Neubrandenburg in Mecklenburg, 5 km SSE of Rechlin airfield and immediately N of the village of Lärz. Lake Müritz (Müritz See) was 3.25 km to the NW. History: Satellite field of Erprobungsstelle Rechlin. Existed from 1918 when an experimental detachment for airborne radio was located there (Flieger-Funker Versuchsabteilung). A large barrack camp was built by the RAD about 1939 that several years later was used to accommodate foreign workers and concentration camp inmates from Ravensbrück. Erprobungsstelle/Erprobungskommando Lärz was established in 1942 was the principal tenant and was engaged in testing pre-production and experimental aircraft, handle some of Rechlin’s air transport activity, and to provide accommodations for the personnel of the various Erprobungskommandos temporarily stationed at Rechlin. After a devastating air attack on Rechlin/Nord (Rechlin/North, i.e., Rechlin Main) on 25 August 1944, all development, experimental and testing work was moved to Lärz. - 378 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dimensions: approx. 1740 x 1740 meters (1900 x 1900 yards) with an “L” shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. Had 2 concrete runways measuring approx. 1920 meters (2100 yards) and aligned NW/SE, and 1550 meters (1700 yards) aligned ENE/WSW. One of these was built in the late 1930’s. Equipped with runway illumination, a beam approach system and a visual Lorenz system. Fuel and Ammunition: there was a refueling loop along the taxiway on the S boundary. Infrastructure: had 2 large hangars with concrete aprons at the E end of the S boundary. A few buildings on the S boundary were probably used as workshops. A small group of barracks and the station flight control building were also on the S boundary. Dispersal: Lärz had a North dispersal and a South dispersal in Jul 44 with a total of 4 medium open aircraft shelters with 6 more under construction. Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Rechlin-Boek (GER) (53 23 08 N – 12 48 00 E). Mock-up 18 km W of Neustrelitz, 10 km NE of Rechlin-Lärz airfield, 6 km NE of Rechlin airfield, 2 km inland from Lake Müritz and1 km SE of the hamlet of Boek. Consisted of 2 fake hangars, 2 fake buildings with some replica aircraft parked outside the hangars. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.966 (1944)] Remarks: 12 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Bf 110s, 7 x Ju 88s, 1 x Ju 52, 4 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Bf 110s, 3 x Ju 88s, 1 x Do 217 and 2 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 10 Apr 45: bombed by 103 B-24 Liberators – near total destruction of the airfield and its infrastructure. 2 May 45: captured by Soviet troops. Operational Units: Erprobungs-u.Lehrstaffel He 177 (Feb 42 – Sep 43); Erprobungs-u.Lehrkdo. 22 (c. Oct 42 – C. Mar 43); Erprobungskdo. Ar 234 (Jul-Nov 44); Nachtjagderprobungskdo. 262 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); 8./ZG 26 (Aug 44); Erprobungskdo. He 162 (Jan 45); Stab, I., III./JG 11 (Apr 45); elements of II./JG 4 (Apr 45); elements of III./JG 7 (Apr 45); Sonderkdo. Braunegg (Apr 45). Station Commands: Feldflugplatz Lärz (c. Feb 42 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 10/XI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.832-33 (19 May 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Laucha/Unstrut (GER) (51 15 00 N – 11 41 30 E) - 379 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) and a major glider training field in Anhalt 24 km WSW of Merseburg, 14 km NW of Naumburg, 3 km NNE of Laucha an der Unstrut and 2.25 km WSW of the town of Gleina. Sited on the edge of a bluff overlooking the River Unstrut just to the W. History: home to a pre-war NSFK glider school that continued glider training during the war years. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 615 x 570 meters (675 x 625 yards). Infrastructure: had 1 medium hangar, 3 small hangars and several workshop buildings off the S corner that were connected to the landing area by taxiway. A small motor pool and a few barrack buildings were near the workshops. Remarks: 29 Jul 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 52s destroyed. School Units: Segelflugschule d.Lw. Laucha (1942-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.958 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lauenburg (GER) (a.k.a. Lebork) (54 32 25 N – 17 47 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Pomerania 57 km WNW of Danzig (Gdansk), 47 km ENE of Stolp (Slupsk) and 2.5 km E of Lauenburg. History: in existence as a landing ground since 1929 and used mainly for glider training during the war. Target-towing aircraft may have also used it. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 685 x 825 meters (750 x 900 yards) and irregular in shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: there was a single small hangar and several sheds off the NE boundary. No evidence of any accommodations in March 1944. The nearest rail connection was in Lauenburg. Operational Units: I.(Jagd)/LG 2 (Sep 39); I.(Stuka)/Trägergruppe 186 (Sep 39). Station Commands: Flugstützpunkt Lauenburg/Pom. (1939). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Kfz.Beständebezirk d.Lw. 1/III C (Aug 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.699 (17 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lauffenberg (GER) (a.k.a. Neuss-Kaarst) (c. 51 12 15 N – 06 41 15 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia very close to Neuss in the Ruhr and probably on the SW side of the city where there was and still is a relatively large expanse of open land. History: laid out in the late 1930’s and used for the 1940 campaign in the West. No mention found of any use after that. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: II.(Schlacht)/LG 2 (Oct 39 – May 40). - 380 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: chronologies; AFHRA, BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lauingen (GER) (c. 48 34 05 N – 10 25 56 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in Bavaria on the Danube 35 km NE of Ulm. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: Grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Laupheim (GER) 48 13 20 N – 09 54 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Baden-Württemberg 20 km SSW of Ulm and 2 km ESE of Laupheim. History: construction began about 1938. Laupheim became a helicopter development and production center in 1943-44 after the Focke Achgelis factory in Bremen was bombed out, but this facility was then bombed out and 6 Fa 223 helicopters destroyed in Jul 44. Further development and production was moved to Berlin. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 870 meters (1150 x 950 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface in good condition. No paved runways. Equipped with a flare path, boundary and obstruction lighting for night operations. Fuel and Ammunition: available – no details. Infrastructure: had 1 very large, 1 large and 1 medium hangar with paved hangar aprons at the SE corner, but these had all been severely damaged during Allied attacks in July and October 1944. Another large hangar and a repair hangar were under construction, and some additional workshop buildings were in the hangar area. Airfield admin, barracks and related buildings were off the SE corner. A group of huts were along the N boundary. A branch rail line served the buildings at the SE corner of the airfield. Dispersal: had a Northwest and a Southeast dispersal with 33+ aircraft bays and parking stands. Defenses: there were 3 light Flak positions on the SE, S and SW sides of the airfield in Dec 43. Remarks: 24 Jul 44: bombed – 1 x Ar 96, 1 x Bf 108 B-1, 12 x Bf 110s and 2 x Fw 44s from III./ZG 101 destroyed or damaged on the ground. Operational Units: II./NJG 4 (Apr-May 42); Eprobungskdo. Laupheim (Nov 43 – Apr 45); 2./ZG 101 (Mar-May 44); III./ZG 101 (Jun-Jul 44); I./JG 113 (Jul-Oct 44); II./JG 106 (Oct 44 – Apr 45). School Units: II./JG 106 (Jul 44 – Apr 45); 2./ZG 101 (1944); III./ZG 101 (Jun – Jul 44).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Laupheim (Jul 40); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 15/VII Memmingen (1944); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 7/VII (Dec 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. (v) 120/XII (1944-45); Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 38/VII (Oct 43 – c.Jul 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.30-31 and 244-46 (22 Jul 44 updated to 24 Mar 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Leba (See) (GER) (54 45 20 N – 17 31 00 E) General: seaplane anchorage 83 km NW of Danzig (Gdansk) in Pomerania and 2.5 km W of Leba on Lake Leba (Jezioro Łebsko). History: an emergency landing site for seaplanes during the 1930’s. A few barrack huts and an ammunition storage facility were built at the lake approx. 1938, but there were no hangars or concrete slipways (launching ramps). Used during the campaign in Poland in Sep 39, but after that only for emergency landings and during occasional air-sea rescue operations. Listed as still operational in Jan 45. Anchorage: in existence since 1929. There was ample and well-sheltered space on the lake for seaplane operations. Infrastructure: no information. Operational Units: none identified. Station Units: 1939 as Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Leba See. Later, Fl.H.Kdtr. E (See) 2/III (1940). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.962 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lechfeld (GER) (a.k.a. present-day as Lager Lechfeld) (48 11 20 N – 10 51 40 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 20 km S of Augsburg in Bavaria. History: construction began in 1934 and it was inaugurated as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. A major pre-war and wartime training base for bombers and night fighters. Wartime conversion courses to the Me 410 and He 177 were carried out here. Additionally, it was a wartime factory airfield (Industriehafen) used by the Messerschmitt firm for final assembly and test flight prior to delivery. In 1944-45, Me 262 jet units were equipped at Lechfeld. Dimensions: approx. 1965 x 1000 meters (2150 x 1100 yards). Surface and Runways: grass on gravel subsoil. Had a single paved runway measuring approx. 1965 x 50 meters (2150 x 50 yards) that was camouflaged. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting and a flare-path for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: the ammunition dump was at the NW corner of the landing area. Infrastructure: had 5 large and 1 medium hangar, all with paved hangar aprons, and a paved taxiway. The hangars, workshops, - 382 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 station HQ, control tower, admin offices, stores buildings, motor pool and garages, extensive barrack accommodations, officers’ mess and quarters were all grouped at the SW end of the airfield. A separate complex of 6 or 7 barracks was at the NW corner. A branch rail line served the W and N boundaries as well as the ammunition dump at the NW corner. Dispersal: there were three dispersals – East, West and North with a total of 22+ large open aircraft shelters and 12 medium open aircraft shelters. Defenses: had 3 light Flak positions along the airfield perimeter in Oct 43. Remarks: 18 Mar 44: bombed by 75-100 8th AAF B-17 Fortresses – 1 x Bf 110 E3 and 1 x Fw 44B from Erprobungskommando 262 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 13 Apr 44: bombed by 93 8th AAF B-24 Liberators. 19 Jul 44: bombed by 98 8th AAF B-17s. 24 Jul 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Do 217 and 3 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 3 x Bf 109s, 1 x Me 262, 1 x Fw 190, 1 x Do 217 and 1 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 12 Sep 44: bombed by 263 15th AAF B-17s and B-24s – claimed 4 aircraft destroyed on the ground, incl. 2 x Me 262s, and damaged to several hangars, admin buildings, warehouses, barracks and workshops. A portion of the runway was also cratered. 18 Nov 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Bf 110, 2 x Fw 190s, 1 x Me 163, 5 x He 111s, 4 x Ju 88s, 4 x He 177s and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Fw 190s, 1 x Me 163, 3 x He 111s, 1 x Ju 88, 2 x He 177s and 3 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 22 Mar 45: strafed by approx. 12 P-51s – 1 x Me 262 shot down in the airfield circuit; light damage to a few buildings. (German report) 9 Apr 45: bombed by 109 8th AAF B-17 Fortresses with heavy damage to runway and landing area along with 1 Me 262 damaged; repairs being made at night. 15/16 Apr 45: 4 RAF Mosquito intruders sent to Lechfeld airfield. Operational Units: Schl.Fl.Gr. 50 (Aug-Sep 38); KGr. z.b.V. 6 (AugOct 38); II./KG 27 (Nov 39 – Feb 40); Stab/LG 1 (Dec 40 – Jan 41); I./KG 51 (May-Jun 40, May-Jul 44)); Stab/SKG 210 (Nov 41 – Jan 42); ZG 1 (Jan-May 42); Erprobungsstaffel Me 210 (May-Jul 42); 1. (Go)/VK(S) 1 (Oct 42); Stab, I./LLG 2 (Oct 42 – Jan 43); I./LLG 2 (Oct 42 – Jan 43); IV./NJG 5 (Dec 42 – Jan 43); Erprobungsstaffel 410 (Jan-Aug 43); I./KG 4 (Feb-Oct 43); 5./KG 2 (May-Jun 43); V./KG 2 (Jun 43); I./KG 100 (Oct 43 – Apr 44); III./KG 40 (Mar-May 44); Erprobungskdo. 262 (Apr-Sep 44); III./ZG 26 (May-Sep 44); Stab/KG - 383 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 51 (May-Aug 44); III./KG 1 (Jun-Jul 44); Einsatzkdo. Schenck (Jun-Jul 44); I./SKG 10 (Jul 44); Sonderkdo. Braunegg (Nov 44); III./JG 7 (Nov-Dec 44); I./JG 7 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); Stab, 1./NAGr. 6 (Dec 44 – Apr 45); 1./NAGr. 13 (Mar-Apr 45); 2./NAGr. 6 (Apr 45); 1. (F)/Aufkl.Gr. 100 (Apr 45); Stab/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Apr 45); Stab/NAGr. 13 (Apr 45). School Units: Bombenschule Lechfeld (Mar 34 – Apr 35); Kampffliegerschule Lechfeld (May 35 – Oct 38); Grosse Kampffliegerschule Lechfeld (Nov 38 – Dec 39); II./NJ-Schule 1 (Nov 42 – Mar 43); II./NJG 101 (May – Dec 43); II.(Versuchs-)/KG 101 (Sep 43 – May 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./KG 54 (later 10. (Erg.)/KG 54) (Jul 40 – Mar 41); Erg.St./KG 51 (Jan – Mar 41); IV./KG 51 (Apr – Aug 41); IV./KG 54 (Apr 41 – Feb 42); IV./KG 40 (Sep 41 – Jan 42); Erg.St./ZG 1 (Jan – Apr 42); 1./Erg.Zerst.Gr. (Apr – Jun 42); 10./NJG 1 (Sep-Oct 42); 13./KG 2 (Jun – Aug 43); IV./KG 40 (Jan – Jul 44); Stab III and 10./Erg.JG 2 (Nov 44 – Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. A Lechfeld; Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/VII (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Karl Deinhardt (1 Sep 35 - 31 Mar 36). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Stab/Kommandeur der Erprobungsstellen d.Lw. (Mar-Apr 45); Werft-Abt. (o) 13/VII (1944); Werft-Abt.(v) 102/XII (1944-45); 10. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 51 (Mar 41); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp. ZG 1 ( ? – 28 Feb 42); 3. Flugh.Betr.Kp. ZG 1 ( ? – 28 Feb 42); 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 2 (Jun 43); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 100 (Oct 43 – May 44); 6./schw.Flak-Abt. 443(o) (Scheuring, Jul 44); elements of I./Flak-Rgt. 501 (Sep 39 – Jun 40); 2./le.Flak-Abt. 738 (Jul 44 – Apr 45); 4./le.Flak-Abt. 738 (Jul 44); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 951 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); elements of 15. (Funkpeilung)/Ln.-Versuchs-Rgt. (Apr 44); Luftmunitionsanstalt 3/VII (at nearby Schwabstadl); Nebelsäure-Nachschublager 1/VII (Schwabstadl, 1944); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 114/VII (1944-45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 56/III (Jul 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 20/VII (Schwabstadl, summer 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 76/VII (summer 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 83/VII (summer 44); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 330/VI (Jan 45 - ? ). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.247-49 (23 Jul 44); A5265 pp.160-61 (Feb 46); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Leck (GER) (54 47 20 N – 08 57 45 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 32 km W of Flensburg in Schleswig-Holstein; airfield 2 km NW of Leck. History: built between 1939 and 1941. - 384 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dimensions: approx. 1200 x 1200 meters (1300 x 1300 yards) in the shape of a square. Surface and Runways: grass surface with a large amount of artificial drainage. Had 3 concrete runways measuring approx. 1200 meters (1300 yards) NW/SE, 1165 meters (1275 yards) ENE/WSW and 1165 meters (1275 yards) ESE/WNW. Ladder-type servicing hardstands wrapped around the entire N side of the landing area, some of these separated by blast walls, and 16 more of them in the shape of a “U” were at the SW corner of the landing area. A paved taxiway encircled the landing area. Equipped for night landings with illuminated runways, perimeter and obstruction lighting and a short version of the visual Lorenz system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were located at the servicing hardstands. Ammunition dumps were in a woods off the N boundary (30 bunkers) and 1.6 km farther out in the same direction (smaller). Infrastructure: had 1 large and 1 small hangar with paved aprons near the SW servicing hardstands with nearby workshops. Barrack blocks, admin and stores buildings were along the S boundary. The control tower and operations block were in the same location but separate and closer to the runways. A special rail line served both the S and N sides of the airfield. Dispersal: 4 areas – Northwest, Northeast, Southeast and Southwest with a total of 29 open and 11 covered aircraft shelters plus 7 parking sites in Feb 44. All were connected to the servicing and runway areas by paved taxiways. Defenses: there were 10 light Flak positions around the airfield in Feb 44, some mounted in Flak towers. This deployment no doubt changed between then and the end of the war. Remarks: Strafed by fighters a few times, but no significant air attacks on Leck airfield noted. 8 May 45: surrendered to British forces. The airfield was found to be packed with 270 aircraft, mostly Bf 109s, Fw 190s, He 162s, Bü 181 trainers and an assortment of 47 bombers. Operational Units: II./KG 30 (Jun-Aug 43); III./KG 30 (Sep 43 – Feb 44); II./KG 100 (Nov-Dec 43); 4./KG 100 (Nov 43 – Mar 44); Stab/KG 30 (Feb 44); part of I./KG 30 (Feb-Jul 44); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 33 (Sep-Oct 44); I./KG 53 (Dec 44 – Mar 45); additionally, a large number of fighters from a variety of units assembled at Leck during the last few days of April and the first week of May 1945. Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 18/XI (Feb 43 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 2/XI (Apr 44 – May 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Wetterberatungsstelle Leck (8 May 45); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 30 - 385 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (1944); 117. Flugh.Betr.Kp. (Qu) (to Jul 43); Stab IV, 10, 11 and 12/Feldwerftverband 90 (8 May 45); Werft-Abt.d.Lw.(o) 2/XI (spring 44 – May 45); Werft-Kdo. 132/VII (8 May 45); Werft-Kdo. 126/XI (8 May 45); Werft-Zug 13/XI (8 May 45); 14. Flugzeug-Wartungs-Kp. (half) (8 May 45); 4./le.Flak-Abt. 876 (1943-44); le.Alarm-Flak-Battr. 104 (8 May 45); Flieger-Geräteausgabestelle (mot) 103/XI and (mot) 105/VI (8 May 45); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 166/XIII (8 May 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.336-40 (29 Feb 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; Air Division Intelligence Summary No. 1] Leipheim (GER) (48 26 25 N – 10 14 00 E) General: operational airfield later upgraded to an airfield (Einsatzhafen/Fliegerhorst) 18 km ENE of Ulm in Bavaria; airfield 2 km SE of Leipheim. History: constructed 1935-36 and ordered established as a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Also an Industriehafen for Messerschmitt. Used mainly as a base for transport aircraft during the war and as a repair center for Me 321 cargo gliders and Me 323 Gigant transports. Dimensions: approx. 1150 x 960 meters (1250 x 1050 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface: grass surface. Runways: had a single concrete runway measuring 1150 meters (1250 yards) in length and aligned ENE/WSW. Work was underway in mid-1944 to extend the runway 275 meters (300 yards) to the west. Paved taxiways ran from each end of the runway to the hangars on the N boundary. Equipped with boundary and obstruction lighting as well as a beam approach system for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: there were 3 sets of refueling points inside the S boundary and additional refueling points on the servicing hardstand on the N boundary. Bulk fuel storage was probably at the SW corner in the same area as the main ammunition dump. Infrastructure: Leipheim had a total of 9 hangars along the N and NW boundaries of the airfield – 2 very large, 1 large repair, 4 large and 2 medium. All but 1 of the hangars had paved hangar aprons. Separate workshop buildings, storage sheds, base motor pool and garages, admin buildings, numerous barracks, messes, station HQ, etc., were all grouped behind the hangars on the N and NW boundaries of the airfield. A branch rail line served the N, W and S boundaries of the landing area. Dispersal: aircraft were accommodated in a Southwest dispersal area and along the perimeter. The aircraft shelters and parking stands were increased from 13 at the beginning of 1944 to at least 16 by mid1944. The Autobahn ran just S of the Southwest dispersal and a taxi

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 track was cut through to it and two access ramps provided in early summer 1944. Defenses: had 3 light Flak positions in multiple Flak towers on the N and NW sides of the field in Jan 44. Satellites and Decoys: Leipheim-Riedhausen (GER) (48 30 00 N – 10 17 00 E). Dummy 7.3 km NNE of Leipheim and 1.6 km SE of the village of Riedhausen. Mock-up included a built-up area of stage-prop sheds off the E boundary and fake gliders painted on the ground. Although it resembled Leipheim airfield, the orientation was incorrect. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.438 (19 Feb 44)] Remarks: 24 Apr 44: bombed by 98 8th AAF B-24 Liberators. 19 Jul 44: bombed by 49 8th AAF B-17 Fortresses – 10 x Me 262s destroyed (7) or badly damaged (3). 18 Nov 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 19 x Me 262s and 1 x Bf 109 destroyed, plus 52 x Me 262s and 2 x Bf 109s damaged. 21 Jan 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x Ju 52 destroyed, plus 1 x Me 262, 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x Ju 52 damaged. 23 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Me 262 and 2 x unidentified aircraft destroyed. 28 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Bf 109s destroyed. 19 Mar 45: bombed by 84 8th AAF B-24s – 28 x Me 262s destroyed and 3 more damaged; motor pool garage destroyed, barracks and base residential quarters damaged; runway and landing area cratered. (German reports) 9 Apr 45: bombed by 88 8th AAF B-24s. Operational Units: II./KG 255 (Mar 37 – Apr 39); I./KG 76 (Sep-Oct 39); I./KG 27 (Oct-Nov 39); Stab/KG 27 (Oct 39 – Jan 40); Stab, II./KG 55 (Feb-Jun 40); Erprobungskdo. H (Apr-May 41); Sonderstaffel (G.S.) 1 (Jun 41); Sonderstaffel (G.S.) 2 (Jun-Nov 41); Sonderstaffel (G.S.) 4 (Jun 41, Nov 41 – Jan 42); Sonderstaffel (G.S.) 22 (Jun 41, Nov 41 – Jan 42); KGr. z.b.V. 323 (May-Nov 42); IV./NJG 5 (Jan 43); II./KG z.b.V. 323 (Jan, Mar 43); III./KG z.b.V. 323 (MarApr 43); III./TG 5 (May-Jul 43); II./TG 5 (Aug 43); I./TG 5 (Aug-Nov 43); Stab/TG 5 (Oct 43 – c. Jan 44); 2./JG 301 (Dec 43 – May 44); III./JG 3 (Feb-Apr 44); part of I., II., III./ZG 76 (Mar 44); II./NJG 5 (Apr 44); 8./ZG 26 (May-Aug 44); IV./NJG 6 (Aug-Sep 44); 16./TG 4 (Sep 44 - ? ); III./NJG 6 (Oct-Nov 44); Stab, I./KG 51 (Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for LKS Fürstenfeldbruck/LKS 4 (1937-45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 5./KGr. z.b.V. 300 (Mar – Apr 43); 5./Erg.Transportgruppe (May – Oct 43). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. L Leipheim (1940); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/VII Neuburg/Donau (Apr-Sep 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 218/XII (Oct 44 – Jan 45); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 233/VII (Feb-Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Leipheim (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 4/VII (Apr 41 – Nov 42); 3./le.Flak-Abt. 951 (Mar 45); le.Heimat-Flak-Bttr. 36/VII (Nov 44 – Jan 45); le.HeimatFlak-Bttr. 45/VII (1944-45); Ln.-Abt. 122 (Sep 41 – Jan 42); LuftgauNachr.Abt. 14 (Wasserburg, Oct-Nov 44); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 23/VII (1940); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 24/VII (1940); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 25/VII (1940); E-HafenAusrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 4/VII; Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 122/VII (1944); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 19/VII (Kleinkötz, summer 44); Sonderkdo. Nebel (Offingen, Jul 44 – Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.250-54 (14 Jan 44 updated to 19 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Leipzig (GER) (51 20 N – 12 22 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfields, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: Stab/LV-Kdo. 3 (Jul 38 – 1938/39); Stab/LV-Kdo. 2 (Aug 39 – Aug 41); Stab/2. Flak-Div. (Sep 41 – Jan 42); Stab/14. Flak-Div. (L-Schönau, c.Jan 42 – 1945); Stab/17. Flak-Div. (Apr 42); Stab/20. Flak-Div. (Nov 42). Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 13 (as Flakgruppe Leipzig (1937 – Apr 41); Stab/Flakscheinw.Rgt. 73 (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Leipzig, Jul 41 – Apr 45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 90 (as Flakgruppe Leipzig, Jun 44 – Apr 45); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 131 (Aug 39); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 300 (as Flakgruppe Leipzig, Apr 41 – May 44). Flak-Abt.: II./Flak-Rgt. 13 (Oct 37 – 1938); le.73 (Nov 38 – 1939); le.94 (Aug-Dec 38); s.121 (1943-45); gem.131 (Aug 39 – 1939/40); s.132 (Aug 39 – 1939/40); s.133 (Aug 39 – 1939/40); s.134 (Aug 39); s.135 (Aug 39); s.136 (Aug/Sep 39); part of s.174 (Feb 44 – 1945); part of s.323 (1942-45); 6./s.333 (1943 – Feb 44); s.430 (Eisb.) (1943 – May 44); 6./s.535 (Eisb.) (Apr-May 44)?; s.563 (Oct 42 – 1942/43); s.564 (1942); gem.566 (Oct 42 – Oct 43); s.568 (Jun 43 – 1945); 4./s.662 (Jun-Jul 44); 3./s.666 (1943 – Feb 44); 4./le.728 (Sep 44 – 1945); Stab and elements of le.729 (Nov 43 – 1945); le.731 (Aug 39); le.733 (Jul 41); le.734 (Jul 41); le.735 (Jul 41); part of le.736 (1943-45); le.737 (Jan 42 - ?); le.738 (Jul 42); le.739 (Jul 42); le.740 (May 42); 3., 4./le.761 (Oct-Nov/Dec 43); 3./le.821 (Eisb.) (Mar-Jun 44); s.902 (Eisb.) (Jun-Aug 44); le.921 (c.1939-43). - 388 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 138 (Aug 39); 178 (Oct 43 – Apr 45); 199 (Apr 41 – Apr 45); 258 (1943-45); 308 (1939-42)?; 328 (Jul 44 – 1945); 350 (1943 – Feb 44); 367 (Jul 44 – 1945); 500 (Aug 43 – 1945); 510 (c.1943-45). Luftsperr-Abt.: 5./104 (1943 – Jan 44). Heimat-Flak: at least 41 batteries at various times. z.b.V. Batterien: at least 9 of these at various times. Other Flak: Flak-Transportbatterie 7/IV (Flak Kaserne, Oct 43); Kdr. d.Flakinstandsetzung 101/IV (1942-45); FlakWaffenwerkstatt (o) 4/IV (1942-45); Flak-Waffenwerkstatt (o) 5/IV (1943-45); Flak-Sondergerätwerkstatt (o) 101/IV (194345). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 13 (1941/42 – Jan 43); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 14 (Jan 40 – 1941/42); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 59 (summer 44 – 1945); LuftschutzNebel-Abt. z.b.V. Leipzig (c.1943-44); Nebel-Kp. d.Lw. 36 (1943 - ? ). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): 11./Ln.-Flugmelde-Rgt. 93 (1943 – Sep 44); Lv-Nachr.Abt. 2 (Feb 40 – Sep 41); Lv-Nachr.Abt. 3 (Apr 39 – Feb 40); Ln.-Abt. 122 (c.Sep 41 – Jan 42); Ln.Betr.Kp. 134 then Ln.-Abt. 134 (L-Schönau, c.Jan 42 – 1945); Medical Services (Sanitätsdienste): Lw.-Lazarett 13/III (n.d.); Other (sonstige, verschiedene): Flieger-Ers.Btl. IV (L-Schönau, c.Jan 43 – Mar 45). Leipzig-Mockau (GER) (51 23 30 N – 12 24 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) and factory airfield (Industriehafen) in Saxony 6 km NNE of Leipzig city center. History: 1932 listed as a secondary airport (Flughafen II). 1935-37 began as a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for ATG (Junkers licensee) and the ERLA firm, these being joined by Junkers just before the war. Dimensions: approx. 1050 x 1050 meters (1150 x 1150 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: level and dry grass surface. Had a single concrete runway measuring approx. 960 meters (1050 yards) and aligned NW/SE. The SW end of the runway was connected by taxiway with the SW dispersal area, and the NW end of the runway was connected by taxiway with the ERLA and ATG buildings. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were on the servicing hardstands. Infrastructure: the main buildings were in 4 groups – (a) off the N boundary was the Allgemeine transport and bomber assembly factory with 3 large assembly buildings, 1 flight hangar, offices and boiler house; (b) off the SE corner was the ERLA Maschinewerk fighter assembly factory with 3 assembly buildings, 2 flight hangars and offices; (c) off the SW corner was the Junkers repair factory with 1 - 389 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 assembly building, 1 components erecting building, workshops, offices, canteens and boiler house; (d) off the W boundary were the buildings of the Luftwaffe station consisting of 2 flight hangars, 1 multi-bay building, numerous workshops and barracks. A rail junction and sidings were off the SW corner. Dispersal: had 3 areas – North, Southwest and Southeast with a total of 9 large aircraft shelters, 17 medium and 30 small. Defenses: had 6 heavy Flak batteries and 11 light Flak batteries within 5.25 km of the airfield in Feb 44. A few of the light Flak positions were in Flak towers and on rooftops. Satellites and Decoys: Leipzig-Göbschelwitz (GER) (51 25 08 N – 12 24 30 E). Dummy 9.25 km NNE of Leipzig, 2.8 km N of Leipzig-Mockau airfield and 1.6 km WSW of the village of Göbschelwitz. Mock-up replicated Leipzig-Mockau airfield and included 5 phony hangars and buildings and fake aircraft parked around the perimeter. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.965 (1944)] Remarks: 23 Sep 43: the SW end of the NE/SW concrete runway extended 320 meters (350 yards) and surfaced giving it a total length of 960 meters (1050 yards). An additional 275 meters (300 yards) has been leveled and rolled for a future extension. 20 Feb 44: airfield and factory area bombed by 276 B-17 Fortresses – severe damage inflicted on the ERLA and Junkers/ATG factory buildings and on the station hangars and buildings; landing area heavily cratered leaving only the NE/SW runway serviceable. 28 May 44: airfield bombed by 28 B-17 Fortresses. 29 May 44: airfield bombed by 149 B-17s. 7 Jul 44: bombed – 1 x Ar 66C, 1 x Ar 96B, 1 x Bü 181 B-1, 2 x Fw 44J and 1 x He 72D from FFS A 61 destroyed or damaged on the ground. 20 Jul 44: airfield bombed by 56 B-17s. 12 Apr 45: low-level attack by 9th AAF P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 16 x Ju 88s, 9 x Fw 190s, 7 x Bf 109s, 6 x He 111s, 5 x Me 410s, 1 x Me 262, 1 x Ju 87, 10 trainers and 1 x captured P-47 shot up and destroyed. 19 Apr 45: Leipzig taken by U.S. 2nd and 69th Divisions (1st Army). Operational Units: Stab/Luftdienst-Abt. I (Apr 41 – 1943); LuftdienstTeilkdo. 1/4 (Jan 39 – Dec 43); Luftdienst-Teilkdo. 1/8 (May 39 – Feb 44). School Units: FFS C 7 (Sep-Oct 39)?; Arbeitsplatz for FFS A 61 (Werder/Havel) (1944-45); Luftdienstlehrkdo. Flensburg (Feb 43).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: as Fl.H. Leipzig-Mockau (to 1943); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 23/IV (Sep 41); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 25/IV (May 43); Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 36/III Alt-Lönnewitz (1944-45). Kommandant (not complete): Obstlt. Johannes Leischner (Jul 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 107/IV (Feb 43); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 108/IV (L-Schönau – Aug 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.700-02 (6 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Leipzig-Schkeuditz (GER) (51 24 30 N – 12 12 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 15 km WNW of Leipzig in Saxony and 2 km NW of the village of Schkeuditz. Near an Autobahn interchange. History: construction began in 1926 and it was designated an airport (Flughafen) in 1927. By 1932 it was listed as a first class airport (Flughafen I) with a customs office. Taken over by the Luftwaffe in the late 1930’s and in 1939 because a factory airfield (Industriehafen) for Siebel-Flugzeugwerke GmbH and DLH overhaul, repair and maintenance workshops. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1050 meters (1300 x 1150 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: level grass surface on clay sub-soil. Had a narrow concrete strip 410 meters (450 yards) in length down the center of the landing area, and 2 servicing hardstands at the SE corner, one of which was connected to the Siebel factory. Equipped with boundary lighting and a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were located on the servicing hardstands. Infrastructure: there was 1 very large hangar with a paved apron, taxiway and a few nearby workshop buildings off the SE corner. The buildings of the Siebel plant were off the SE corner and included a very large repair hangar, an assembly shop, workshops, offices, canteens and a heating plant. Station motor pool, garages, the airfield flight control building and a hutted camp were off the SE corner while the barracks and stores buildings were E of the factory complex. The nearest rail connection was the Schkeuditz station, just off the SE corner. Dispersal: had 3 dispersals – Southeast (off corner), South (perimeter) and West (off boundary) – with a total of 21 large open aircraft shelters plus 6 “Dutch-barn” type shelters, each of which was approx. 73 meters (240 feet) in length and apparently used for the storage of aircraft fuselages and wings. Defenses: unknown.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Remarks: the city of Leipzig was bombed several times by the RAF beginning in late Oct 43, but no evidence has been found that Schkeuditz airfield was specifically targeted during these raids. 12 Apr 44: airfield and factory bombed by part of a force of 174 B-17 Fortresses. 16 Aug 44: airfield and factory bombed by 92 B-17s. 12 Apr 45: low-level attack by 9th AAF P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 14 x He 111s and 3 x Do 217s shot up and destroyed plus 1 hangar wrecked. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 12/IV (1941); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 40/III Halle-Nietleben (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 9/IV (Feb-Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.862-64 (7 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lelkendorf (GER) (53 50 40 N – 12 44 00 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Mecklenburg 44 km NW of Neubrandenburg, 4.75 km NE of Neukalen and on the NE side of the village of Lelkendorf. History: in existence by 1937. No mention of Luftwaffe use found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.969 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lembruch (GER) (c. 52 32 26 N – 08 20 40 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Lower Saxony 35 km NE of Osnabrück and 10 km S of Diepholz. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lemwerder (GER): see Bremen-Lemwerder. Lengerich (GER) (52 10 56 N – 07 51 45 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in North Rhine – Westphalia 17 km SW of Osnabrück – the exact location in respect to the town is not known. History: no further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lenggries (GER) (c. 47 41 08 N – 11 33 43 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 47 km NNE of Innsbruck and 50 km S of München (Munich). History: no further

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lenzkirch (GER) (47 52 01 N – 08 12 57 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 31 km SE of Freiburg and 5 km SE of Lake Titisee. History: laid out in 1939-40. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Leobschütz (GER) (a.k.a. Glubczyce) (c. 50 13 00 N – 17 47 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Silesia 45 km SE of Neisse (Nysa); airfield 3 km WNW of Leobschütz. History: no record found of any use by the Luftwaffe. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 365 x 275 meters (400 x 300 yards). Infrastructure: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.970 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Leutewitz (GER): see Riesa-Leutewitz. Leutkirch (GER) (47 49 45 N – 10 00 35 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in BadenWürttemberg 22 km SW of Memmingen. History: 1927 listed as a Notlandeplatz. Listed as operational in Feb 45. No record of use by the Luftwaffe. Surface and Dimensions: had a grass surface measuring approx. 410 x 150 meters (450 x 165 yards). Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.455 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lichtenau (GER) (48 41 15 N – 11 21 10 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Bavaria, 65 km NNW of Munich, 11 km SSW of Ingolstadt and 2 km S of the village of Lichtenau. History: dates from December 1934 but purposeful construction did not begin until spring 1936. A landing area was cleared, leveled and grass planted, 6 below ground fuel storage tanks installed and 8 barracks built with accommodations for 1,000 men. Flying operations began in May 1939. The airfield was used by bomber units to May 1940 but almost no use from then to December 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1100 meters (1300 x 1200 yards). Runway: grass surface. No paved runway. Infrastructure:

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 no hangars or workshops. Had extensive railway sidings on station property. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities. Defenses: none aside from some unmanned machine gun strongpoints on the NW and NE boundaries. Remarks: 1945: attacked several times by USAAF fighter-bombers but not believed to have been targeted by heavy bombers. Operational Units: II./KG 4 (Sep-Oct 39); I./KG 55 (Apr-May 40). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 112 (Ingolstadt) (1940-41). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 10., 11. and 12./KG (J) 40 (Dec 44 – Jan 45); 5./Erg.KG(J) (Jan-Feb 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Lichtenau (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 6/VII (1940); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/VII Neuburg/Donau (1944-45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Java I (fighter control) and Sumatra (aircraft reporting) railway radar trains belonging to Ln.-Flugmelde-Abt. (E) z.b.V. 21 and 22 (winter 1942/43 for several weeks); 1.(Raubvogel 1)/Ln.-Flugmelde-Abt. (E) z.b.V. 22 (Feb 45); Lw.-Beutesichtungs- und Weiterleitungsstelle 2 and 6 (194344); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 232/XI (summer 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.255 (19 Dec 43); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk; web site fliegerhorste.de] Liebenwalde (GER): see Kreuzbruch. Liegnitz (GER) (a.k.a. Legnica) (51 11 10 N – 16 11 30 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 60 km WNW of Breslau (Wrocław) in Silesia and 3.25 km SE of Liegnitz. History: Liegnitz was an old World War I airfield that lay unused for 15 years until taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1935 and developed into a large components, parts and equipment depot which remained there throughout the war. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. Home to a number of operational units during the pre-war years and then to reserve training and replacement units during the war. Also a wartime practice field for twin-engine trainers. Dimensions: approx. 1190 x 1000 meters (1300 x 1100 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface that tended to be soft in wet weather. No paved runway. Equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling were on the N and S boundaries, and bulk fuel storage was off the N boundary near the admin buildings. A small ammunition dump was at the S end of the E boundary. Infrastructure: had 4 large flight hangars and 1 medium repair hangar along the N boundary, plus 2 large hangars off the NE corner. All had paved aprons and were interconnected by taxiways. Numerous - 394 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 workshop buildings, engine test beds, the motor pool and garages were behind the hangars on the N side. The main station buildings were at the center of the N boundary behind the workshops. The station HQ was at the NW corner, the flight control building and fire station on the flight line at the center of the N boundary. The Luftzeugamt components and parts storage facilities comprised some 70-75 buildings and warehouses off the NW side of the airfield. The 3 barrack complexes were off the NW corner, off the NE corner and off the SE corner. A branch rail line served the warehouse, hangar and workshop area off the NW corner and on the N boundary, and a second branch line passed by off the SW corner. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities (Apr 44). Defenses: unknown. Remarks: May 44: work began to lay out 2 dispersal areas off the NE and S boundaries. 22 Mar 45: Liegnitz taken by Soviet forces. Operational Units: IV./KG 153 (Apr 37 – Oct 38); 2., 3./JG 131 (AugOct 38); II./KG 252 (Nov 38 – Apr 39); Stab, I., II./KG 2 (May-Oct 39); Stab, IV./KG z.b.V. 1 (Aug-Sep 39); Aufkl.St./Fliegerdivision 7 (Aug-Sep 39); III./KG 53 (Feb 41). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 18 then FFS B 18 (Lüben) (Sep 41 – Sep 44); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 22 then FFS B 22 (Oels) (Oct 41 – Oct 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 5./Erg.Transportgeschwader (Oct 43 – Jul 44); Kommodore der Ergänzungsjagdgruppen (Nov 44); JGr. Ost (Feb – Nov 44); 2./Erg.JGr. Süd (Jun 44); 3./Erg.JGr. Nord (Sep – Oct 44); Stab and elements of Erg.JG 1 (Nov 44 – Jan 45); II./SG 151 (Oct 44 – Jan 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H.Kdtr. Liegnitz (to 1943); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 42/III (Apr – Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 8/VIII (Jun 44 – c.Mar 45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Paul Weitkus ( ? - Nov 39) 9/39; Oberst Armin Christenn (Nov 39 - Feb 43?); Oberst Hans Beusse (4 Feb 43 ? ). Lw. Station Units (on the airfield, in the city or nearby on various dates – not complete): Koflug Liegnitz (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 7/IV (AprJan 43); 1. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 2 (May-Oct 39); 2. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 2 (May-Oct 39); 4. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 2 (May-Oct 39); 5. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 2 (May-Oct 39); Werft-Abt. 55/III (1944-45); II./Flak-Rgt. 46 (gem. mot.) (Feb 45); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 55/IV (194344); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 25/VIII (1944-45); 21./Ln.-Versuchs-Rgt. (May 44); III.(Ausb.Abt.f.Ln.Helferinnen)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 8 (1944); Fluko Liegnitz; Stab/Lw.-Bau-Btl. Liegnitz (1939-40); Luftzeugamt - 395 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 3/XI (c. 1939-45); Flieger-Geräteausgabestelle 101/VII (May 44)?; EHafen-Ausrüstungs-Kolonne (mot) 46/VI; Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 344/XI (Jan 45)?; Lw.-Leitstelle II Liegnitz (Jan-Feb 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.704-07 (28 Apr 44 updated to 11 May 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Limburg (GER) (50 23 54 N – 08 04 46 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on the airfield at Linter, in the city or nearby – not complete): Luftwaffenkdo. West (Schloss Dehrn, Sep 44 – Mar 45); Koflug 4/XII (Oberneisen Sep 44 – Jan 45); Stab/Feldwerftverband 20 (c.Oct 44 - 1945); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 3 (Weyer, c.Nov 44 – Mar 45); I./Ln.-Rgt. 3 (Hadamar, c.Nov 44 – Mar 45); Stab I./Ln.Rgt. 53 (Sep 44); Stab/Ln.-Rgt. 351 (Runkel, Oct 44 – Mar 45); Stab I.(Funkh.) and components/Ln.-Rgt. 351 (Runkel, Oct 44 – Mar 45); III.(Funkh.)/Ln.-Rgt. 351 (Burgschwalbach, Oct 44 – Mar 45); 25. (Ausw.)/Ln.-Rgt. 351 (Oct 44 – Mar 45); 26.(Betr..)/Ln.-Rgt. 351 (Oct 44 – Mar 45); Stab/Ln.-Funkhorch-Rgt. West (Sep-Oct 44); Ln.-Kp. z.b.V. 2 (Langenbach, Sep 44 – Jan 45); Ln.-Techn.Kp. (Bord) 2 (Hahnstätten, Jan-Feb 45); 3./Ln.-Abt. 72 (Jan 45); Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 9/VII (fall 44 – 1945). Limburg/Lahn (GER) (c. 50 23 44 N – 08 04 35 E) General: grass surface emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Hesse 53 km NW of Frankfurt/Main and on the east bank of the Lahn 1.5 km E of Limburg that dated from at least 1927. No information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Limburg-Linter (GER) (50 21 45 N – 08 04 20 E) General: landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in Hesse 3 km SSE of Limburg an der Lahn (33 km E of Koblenz) and 1 km W of the village of Linter. History: construction began in 1936 and was said to have been on-going throughout the war. Used as a glider training field. After the retreat from France, fighters were based there. Dimensions: approx. 1830 x 775 meters (2000 x 850 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface, well drained. No paved runway. Equipped for night landings with a visual Lorenz system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were set up on the N boundary and ammunition was available at the dispersal areas. Infrastructure: had 1 large hangar and the foundation for a second off the NW corner. There was a workshop building just E of the hangar. A small cluster of buildings, including 5 suspected barracks, was positioned approx. 600 meters N of the N boundary. Nearest rail connection at Limburg. Dispersal: 3 areas – North, Northeast (remote) and Southeast with a

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 total of at least 11 blast bays and 8 hardstands. Defenses: not noted. Remarks: although Limburg’s marshaling yard and bridges were bombed often, little attention was paid to the landing ground by Allied 4-engine bombers. 19 Jul 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 7 x Ju 188s and 1 x Do 217 destroyed, plus 7 x Ju 188s damaged. 5 Sep 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47s – claimed 1 x Bf 110, 3 x Me 210s, 4 x Ju 88s, 1 x He 111 and 2 x Fi 156s destroyed, plus 1 x Bf 110, 5 x Ju 88s, 2 x Me 210s, 2 x Bf 109 G-6s from III./JG 3 damaged. 15 Mar 45: bombed and strafed by approx. 10 P-47s – 3 x Fw 190s and 1 x Fw 189 slightly damaged; 1 WIA. (German report) 19 Mar 45: bombed and strafed by approx. 8 P-47s – 4 x Fw 190s and 3 x Bf 109s slightly damaged, hangar roof damaged. (German report) 26-27 Mar 45: Limburg/Lahn and Limburg-Linter airfield taken by U.S. 9th Armored Div. Operational Units: 1.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 14 (Nov 39 – May 40); III./JG 3 (Sep 44); Stab, 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 123 (Sep-Oct 44); 2./NAGr. 1 (Oct 44 – Mar 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E 3/VII (Mar-May 40)?; Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 7/XII Mainz-Finthen (Apr-Jun 44); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 23/VII Mainz-Finthen (Jun 44 – Sep 44?); Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 213/XII Merzhausen (Oct 44 – 1945); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 212/XI (Mar 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): see above under Limburg. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.345-47 (10 Dec 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Lindau (Land) (GER) (47 32 40 N – 09 44 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Bavaria 20 km SE of Friedrichshafen on the Bodensee (Lake Constance); airfield 4 km E of Lindau. 1927 listed as a Notlandeplatz with a grass surface measuring approx. 840 x 630 yards). No record of wartime use by the Luftwaffe. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.455 (12 Apr 42); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lindau (See) (GER) (c. 47 33 04 N – 09 42 41 E) General: seaplane anchorage in Lindau harbor, 20 km SE of Friedrichshafen on the Bodensee (Lake Constance). History: used occasionally during the war as a rest and refueling stopover. Anchorage: there was ample take-off and alighting space on the lake. Infrastructure: unknown.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lindenberg (GER) (52 11 20 N – 14 08 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Brandenburg 33 km SW of Frankfurt/Oder and 2 kn SE of the village of Lindenberg. History: existed, but no mention found of Luftwaffe use. Surface and Dimensions: unknown. Infrastructure: none. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.970 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lindengarten (GER/RUSS) ( ?? ) General: field airstrip in the Königsberg/East Prussia area – not located. Listed as operational in Sep 41 under Koflug 3/I KönigsbergNeuhausen. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lindenthal (GER/RUSS) ( ?? ) General: field airstrip in the Königsberg/East Prussia area – not located. Listed as operational in Sep 41 under Koflug 3/I KönigsbergNeuhausen. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lingen (GER) (52 37 35 N – 07 17 40 E) General: landing ground (Feldflugplatz) in Lower Saxony 86 km S of Emden, 11.5 km N of Lingen and 7.3 km S of Meppen. History: construction began before the 1940 campaign in the West but was abandoned in summer 1940. Never in operational use. Dimensions: approx. 915 x 90 meters (1000 x 100 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: unknown. Infrastructure: none seen. Dispersal: no organized dispersal. Operational Units: none found. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.348 (22 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Linn (GER): see Krefeld-Linn. Linter (GER): see Limburg-Linter. Lippe (GER) (a.k.a. today: Flughafen Siegerland) (50 42 50 N – 08 04 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) 18 km SSE of Siegen (66 km E of Bonn) in North Rhine – Westphalia; airfield 1.6 km ENE of Lippe village. History: built during 1938-39. Used during spring 1940 but then inactive until fall 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 825 meters (1100 x 900 yards). Surface and Runways: grass - 398 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 surface (no paved runway). Fuel and Ammunition: fuel available and the ammunition dump was approx. 730 km E of the landing area and connected to it by a taxiway. Infrastructure: there were a few workshop-type buildings on the NE corner. A small group of barrack buildings were off the N boundary and the flying control building was believed to be in the center of the N boundary. A branch rail line served the airfield. Dispersal: an unknown number of aircraft bays and parking stands were well concealed in woods off the SE and NW corners of the landing area. Remarks: 11 Mar 45: bombed – runway and landing area cratered and operations limited to an auxiliary strip. (German report) 14 Mar 45: low-level attack by 9th AAF P-47 fighter-bombers – 22 x Ju 87s from NSGr. 2 destroyed on the ground according to the German account, while 9th AAF claimed the destruction of 44 x Ju 87s and Bf 109s on the ground. The Ju 87s were fueled and bomb-up for an attack on the Ludendorff Bridge at Remagen. Additionally, minor damage to landing area and buildings, 2 KIA and 1 WIA. Operational Units: NSGr. 2 (Mar 45); Fliegerzielgruppe III (1945). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) Lippe (Aug 39 – Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 21/XII (Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 212/XI or Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 212/XII (c.Oct 44 – Apr 45)? Station Units (on various dates – not complete): le.Feldwerft-Staffel 6/40 (1 Jan 45); le.Feldwerftzug 3/10 (Mar 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.350-51 (6 Jul 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Lippen (GER) (51 56 00 N – 15 15 00 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Saxony 44 km S of Cottbus, 23 km N of Bautzen and 3 km NW of the village of Lippen. History: a former civil emergency landing ground on the Berlin-Breslau route. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none known. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.959 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lippspringe (GER) (a.k.a. Bad Lippspringe) (51 47 00 N – 08 47 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen II) in North Rhine – Westphalia 8.5 km NNE of Paderborn and 1.6 km WNW of Bad Lippspringe. History: built in the late 1930’s. Relatively inactive during 1941-42, but then became a very busy fighter airfield. Dimensions: approx. 1000 x 730 meters (1100 x 800 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface in good condition but undrained. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: - 399 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 both available as needed. Infrastructure: had a workshop off the SE boundary as well as a small group of office and barrack buildings. There was also a large hospital located in a woods off the airfield boundary. Nearest rail connection at Bad Lippspringe. Dispersal: 3 areas – North, Southeast and Southwest with a total of 26 aircraft bays cut into woods. Remarks: does not seem to have received much attention from the Allies – no mention of significant attacks found. Operational Units: I./KG 54 (Sep-Nov 39); Stab/KG z.b.V. 2 (Mar-May 40); KGr.z.b.V. 9 (Mar 40 – Jan 41 or later); I./ZG 1 (Aug-Sep 43); I./ZG 26 (Oct-Dec 43); Stab/JG 1 (Apr-Jun 44); III./JG 53 (Jun-Aug 44); Stab/JG 4 (Jul-Sep 44); 4./Gruppe West (Flugzeugüberführungsgeschwader 1) (Aug-Sep 44); III./JG 4 (SepOct 44); I./SG 4 (Nov-Dec 44); II./TG 3 (Dec 44); 6./NJG 4 (Jan-Mar 45); III./NJG 11 (Mar 45); II./JG 27 (Mar 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 72 (Detmold) (1939). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Lippspringe (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 5/VI (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 213/XI (Oct 44 – Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.352-53 (10 Feb 45); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Lippstadt (GER) (51 43 00 N – 08 22 20 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 26 km W of Paderborn in North Rhine – Westphalia and 4.8 km NNE of Lippstadt. History: dates from 1933-34 as a practice field for gliders with a hangar and an administrative building or barrack built in late 1934. The Luftwaffe took it over in 1935 and it was officially designated a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur on 29 February 1936. Lippstadt was home to both fighter and bomber units before the war, and during the war units came here to rest and refit. Dimensions: approx. 1280 x 1100 meters (1,400 x 1,200 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface on sandy soil. No paved runway. Had a flare path, perimeter lighting and obstruction illumination. Fuel and Ammunition: had fuel storage, refueling points and a small ammunition dump. Infrastructure: communications, compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities were available. There were 8 hangars – 1 large to the NW of the field, 1 large with adjacent workshops on the S boundary and 6 medium with tarmac aprons along the SE boundary. Barrack blocks, officer quarters, officers’ club, messes, dispensary, flying control (Flugleitung), motor pool and garages, station HQ (Kommandantur), and admin and supply buildings, sports and exercise ground all off the S boundary. A

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 narrow-guage rail spur connected the main building area with the railway line in Lippstadt. Dispersal: 11 large aircraft shelters, 8 of which covered with camouflage netting. Additional shelters and bays were under construction in mid-1944. Defenses: light Flak positions in towers and on rooftops. Remarks: 19 Apr 44: bombed by 122 B-17 Fortresses with considerable damage to buildings. 5 Oct 44: bombed by 175 B-24 Liberators with further severe damage to the infrastructure. 28 Jan 45: bombed by 9 B-24s. 23 Mar 45: strafed by 3 P-51s – 4 x Ju 87s slightly damaged. (German report) 29 Mar 45: station evacuated and all remaining technical facilities, especially hangars, demolished. 1 Apr 45: captured by advancing U.S. forces. Operational Units: III./JG 134 (Feb-Mar 36, Mar 37); Stab, I./KG 254 (Apr 37 – Oct 38); III./JG 142 (Nov-Dec 38); III./ZG 142 (Jan-Apr 39); III./ZG 26 (May-Aug 39); I.(Jagd)/LG 2 (Dec 39); I./ZG 26 (Dec 39 – Jan 40); I./St.G. 77 (Feb-Mar 40); KGr.z.b.V. 11 (Apr-Jun 40); KGr.z.b.V. 101 (May 40); 2.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 32 (May 41); I./SKG 210 (May-Jun 41); II./Schl.G. 1 (Jan-Apr 42); 4., 8./Schl.G. 1 (Apr-May 42); 1./NJG 11 (Aug-Nov 44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Stuka-Erg.St./VIII. Fliegerkorps (May 40 – Mar 41); Erg.St.(Schl.)/LG 2 (Aug 40 – Jan 42); Erg.St./Schl.G. 1 (Jan – Mar 42); 5./Erg.JGr. Ost (Mar – Apr 42). Station Commands: Fliegerhorst Lippstadt (1930’s – 1942); Fl.H.Kdtr. A 6/VI (1943 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 6/VI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 8. Flugh.Betr.Kp./ZG 26; Flugh.Betr.Kp. 126; II./Flak-Rgt. 9 (Oct 36 – 1938); III./Flak-Rgt. 44 (Jul 38 – 1941); Feld-Flakartillerieschule (Mitte) 14 (1942-44); Frontfliegersammelgruppe Lippstadt (1943). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.354-58 (12 Dec 43 with additions to 19 Apr 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] List (See) (GER) (55 01 15 N – 08 26 15 E) General: seaplane station (Seefliegerhorst) on north tip of Sylt off W coast of Schleswig-Holstein. Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. History: List was a Zeppelin station during World War I and remained in continuous existence after that. In 1934, major development began and by 1937 it was a fully operational as a large seaplane station. - 401 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Dimensions: there were ample alighting and take-off facilities. Anchorage: large tidal changes, rough waters and pack ice (December to March) existed. Had two launching ramps for the seaplanes just N of the harbor with a large girder-type crane adjacent to them. Fuel and Ammunition: underground fuel and ammunition storage were along the coast 1 to 2 km N of the station. Infrastructure: had 5 large hangars and 1 small hangar, with one of the large hangars reserved for repairs. A double engine test-bed was sited along the coast road just S of the harbor. The station HQ, operations building, stores and other facilities were approx. 200 meters N of the harbor. Barracks for Luftwaffe station personnel were W of the main station buildings and there were two large housing estates for officers, ground staff and civilians to the NW and SW of the harbor. A single narrow guage rail line linked the station to Westerland and from there on the standard line across the Hindenburg Damm to the mainland. Remarks: does not appear to have received much attention from the Allies – no mention of significant air attacks found. 8May 45: upon the surrender of German forces, the airfield had an occupancy of 24 flying boats and floatplanes. Operational Units: Fliegerstaffel (F) List (c.Nov/Dec 33 – Mar 35); Kü.Aufkl.St. (F) 1./126 (Apr 35 - ? ); Kü.Fl.Gr. 106 (Oct 36 – Jun 37); Kü.Fl.Gr. 406 (1937-41); Kü.Fl.Gr. 506 (Oct 39 – Apr 40); 1. Seenotstaffel (Jun 39 – Jun 40); 2./Kü.Fl.Gr. 106 (Dec 39 – Mar 40); 5. Seenotstaffel (Jun 40 – Jul 41); 3./Kü.Fl.Gr. 506 (Apr-Jun 41); Aufkl.Gr. 125 (See) (Oct-Nov 41); 3./SAGr. 125 (Sep 44); Seenotstaffel 80 (Mar-May 45). Station Commands: referred to in a Luftgaukdo. XI document dated 11 Dec 44 and a OKL document dated 10 Feb 45 as Fl.H.Kdtr. See (A) List without a number and subordinated directly under Koflug 3/XI (Schleswig). Kommandant (not complete): Obstlt. Karl Engelbrecht (4 Nov 42 26 Mar 43); Obstlt. Hans Petzet (27 Mar 43 - Sep 43); Obstlt. Mathias von Bredow (Sep 43 ? ); Oberst Wilhelm Plachte ( ? ? ) 3/45. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Seenotbezirksstelle (L) List (1938-38); Seenotbereichskdo. V (Aug 39 – Jun 42); Seenotkdo. 27 (Aug 39 – Aug 44); Erg.Seenotflotille (Jun 40 – Aug 44); Wetternebenstelle List (1945); Werft-Abt.d.Lw.(o) 205/XI (1945). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.359-61 (21 Mar 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; Air Division Intelligence Summary No. 1] Littausdorf (GER/RUSS) (a.k.a. Litthausdorf) (c. 54 41 41 N – 20 07 55 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: field landing strip (Feldflugplatz) in the former East Prussia 15 km ENE of Pillau (Baltiysk) near the present-day village of Svetlyy and c.11 km SSE of Palmnicken (Yantarnyy) on the Sambian Peninsula, 40 km W of Königsberg. Used in 1945. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lobbe (GER) (54 19 07 N – 13 43 06 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) on Rügen Island off the Baltic coast in N Germany. History: listed as still operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by Luftwaffe flying units found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. School Units: Seefahrtschule d.Lw. (c. 1941-45); Sanitäts-Ausb.Kp. bei Seefahrtschule d.Lw. (c. 1941-45). [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lobellen (GER) (54 56 30 N – 22 15 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in the former East Prussia 25 km SE of Tilsit (Sovetsk). History: very limited activity until the front approached in Aug 44. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Remarks: 19 Jan 45: overrun by advancing Soviet forces. Operational Units: 2.(H)/Aufkl.Gr. 23 (Jun 41); Nahaufkl.St. 11./12 (Aug-Sep 44); Stab, I., II./SG 1 (Aug-Sep 44); III./SG 77 (Sep 44); I./SG 4 (Sep-Oct 44); III./JG 52 (Oct 44); I./JG 51 (Oct-Nov 44). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Löbnitz (GER) (51 34 50 N – 12 29 25 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Saxony 33 km SSE of Dessau, 29-30 km N of Leipzig, 12 km NE of Delitzsch and 2.5 km SE of Löbnitz. History: laid out in 1938-39, but no evidence found of operational use until fall 1944 when it became a fighter station. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1145 x 355 meters (1250 x 390 yards) with an “L” shape. No paved runway. Infrastructure: no hangars or workshops, but several small buildings off the NW corner may have been used for temporary accommodations. Nearest rail connection in Düben, 8 km ENE of the landing ground. Dispersal: there were at least 7 aircraft bays cut into the woods off the S boundary (Feb 45). Operational Units: II./JG 300 (Oct 44 – Apr 45); III./JG 4 (Apr 45).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E Löbnitz (Aug 39 – c. Feb/Mar 40). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 48/III (1944-45)?; le.Feldwerft-Abt. II/40 (Feb 45)? [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.708 (11 Mar 45); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lochstädt (See) (GER) (54 42 50 N – 19 57 30 E) General: seaplane anchorage in East Prussia 36 km W of Königsberg and 6.5 km NNE of Pillau (Baltiysk). History: a sea rescue training establishment located at Lochstädt during the 1939-41 period, and then it was briefly used again in fall 1944. Anchorage: ample space for take-offs and landings. Infrastructure: none. Operational Units: Stab, 1., 2., 3./SAGr. 126 (Oct-Dec 44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. E (See) Lochstädt (1939-40); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 12/I (See) (1940); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 13/I (See) (Mar 40 – Jul 41). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.962 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Locken (GER) (a.k.a. Lukta, Łukta) (c. 53 48 N – 20 05 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in East Prussia 25 W of Allenstein (Olsztyn). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Loddenheide (GER): see Münster-Loddenheide. Löningen (GER) (c. 52 44 06 N – 07 45 51 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Lower Saxony 54 km NNW of Osnabrück and 13.5 km WNW of Quakenbrück. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: sandy ground. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lonner Tannen (GER): see Vechtel. Lorsch (GER): see Einhausen. Losheim (GER) (a.k.a. Losheim am See) (49 30 30 N – 06 45 40 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in the Saarland 28 km SSE of Trier and 1.6 km W of Nieder Losheim. History: no record of use by the Luftwaffe of this approx. 915 x 365 meter (1000 x 400 yards) grass surface landing ground. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.455 (26 Sep 39); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lotschen (GER) (50 53 16 N – 11 43 11 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: alternate landing ground or dispersal field (Ausweichflugplatz) in Thuringia 10 km SE of Jena. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lottin (GER) (a.k.a. Lotyn, Lotyń) (c. 53 36 N – 16 48 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Pomerania c. 48 km SE of Köslin (Koszalin). History: no evidence found of Luftwaffe use after the Sep 39 attack on Poland. Operational Units: 1./LG 2 (Sep 39). Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: Mattiello; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lötzen (GER) (a.k.a. today: Gizycko) (54 02 30 N – 21 46 15 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in the former East Prussia 66 km SSE of Insterburg (Chernyakhovsk). History: listed as an emergency landing ground in 1935. Upgraded to an Einsatzhafen in 1940-41 in preparation for the attack on the USSR in Jun 41. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Fuel and Ammunition: both available. Infrastructure: unknown. Operational Units: Kurierstaffel 110 d.OKH (Jun 41 - 1942); Stab, I./Fliegerverbindungsgeschwader 2 (Nov 43 – Aug 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 51 then FFS A/B 51 (Heiligenbeil) (1940-42). Station Commands: Koflug Lötzen (Sep 41); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 46/XI (c.Aug/Sep 41 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 215/I (Apr 44 – Jan 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): part of FeldwerftAbt. I/60 (Aug 44); Stab/27. Flak-Div. (Oct-Dec 44); Stab/10. FlakBrig. (Oct 44); Koflug 6/I (Oct 40 – c.Feb 42); Koflug 10/IV (Apr-Jul 41); Koflug 6/IV (Jul 41)?; elements of le.Flak-Abt. 854 (Jan 45); Stab/Telegrafenbau-Abt. (mot) z.b.V. 2 d.Lw. (Jan-Mar 41); Ln.-Abt. 147 (Oct-Dec 44); Stab/Lw.-Bau-Rgt. 5/VI (Jun 41); Fahr-Kol. d.Lw. 4/III (Sep 41); 3.Zug of Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 4/I (Sep 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 94/VI (Sep 41). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.959 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lowenstadt (Löwenstadt) (GER): often appears in Allied documents, possibly in reference to the city of Braunschweig and/or the two airfields around it - see there. Löwental (GER): see Friedrichshafen-Löwenthal. Lübeck (GER) (53 52 N – 10 40 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates and not specifically identified with the airfield): Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: none. Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 61 (as Flakgruppe Lübeck, Apr 41 – May 44); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 66 (as Flakgruppe Lübeck, Jun 44 – 1945). Flak-Abt.: gem.161 (c.1941-43); s.232 (c.1942/43 – Nov 44); part of s.275 (Oct 43 – Mar 44); s.306 (Jun-Nov 44); s.413 (Jan-Nov 44); 4./s.461 (c.1943 – Sep 44); 2./s.602 (Dec 43 – Apr 44); part of gem.604 (Jun-Aug 44); 1./s.607 (Aug-Nov 44); 3./s.611 (Jan-Sep 44); part of gem.613 (Mar-Nov 44); gem.617 (1942); le.770 (1942/43 – 1945); 5./le.822 (Eisb.) (Feb 44 – 1945); le.916 (Jan 44 – 1945). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 580 (Aug 43 – May 44); 584 (Jan-May 44). Luftsperr-Abt.: 105 (1943 – Mar 44); 201 (Jul 44 – 1945). Alarm-Flak: c. 10 batteries. Heimat-Flak: c. 14 heavy and light batteries. z.b.V. Batterien: 2-4 batteries. Other Flak: Flak-Waffenwerkstatt (o) 5/XI (c.1942/43 – 1945). Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): I.(Funkh.)/Ln.-Rgt. 353 (Apr 45); Stab III.(Ausb.Abt.f.Ln.Helferinnen)/Luftgau-Nachr.Rgt. 11 (Lübeck – Sankt Hubertus, 1942-44); III./Ln.-Ers.- u.Ausb.Rgt. 2 (Lübeck – Sankt Hubertus, May 44 – 1945); Ln.-Abt. 358 (Funkh.Ausb.) (Feb 45); 8.(Celebes I)/Ln.-Flugmelde-Abt. (E) z.b.V. 21 (Feb 45 - ? ); Luftgaubereichswerkstatt (N) 1/XI (Lübeck – Sankt Hubertus, c.1942-45). Lübeck-Blankensee (GER) (53 48 20 N – 10 42 40 E) General: Fliegerhorst 7.2 km SSE of Lübeck in Schleswig-Holstein and immediately N of the village of Blankensee and S of the village of Sankt Hubertus. Tiny Lake Blankensee lies close to the SE boundary of the airfield. History: constructed 1933-36 with a concrete runway, hangars, numerous barrack blocks and other buildings. Officially designated a Lw. Fliegerhorstkommandantur by 1 October 1936. Heavily used both before and during the war, and long-time home field of KG 26. It was also used by the Dornier-Werke in Lübeck to test fly new aircraft prior to their delivery. Toward the end of the war, Me 262 and Ar 234 jet units began using Blankensee making it a target of interest to the Allies. Dimensions: 1,600 x 1,050 meters. Extension work was underway at the E end in Dec 44.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 had one 2,000 meter concrete runway with a narrow 200 meter extension at the W end. Flarepath, perimeter and obstruction lighting and the short form of visual Lorenz afforded night landings. Surface and Runways: had fuel storage, refueling points and ammunition dump. Infrastructure: communications, , compass swing, machine gun registration range and other amenities available. Had 2 large hangars, 6 medium hangars and 1 enormous repair hangar for a total of 9, all along the S boundary. Flying control (Flugleitung) was located on the flightline halfway between the hangars, and admin, supply and motor pool buildings were behind the hangars. A branch rail line served the repair hangar, the fuel dump and the munitions dump. Dispersal: three areas with a total of 49 open aircraft shelters plus 3 hardstands (Dec 44). Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Lübeck-Schlagsdorf (GER) (53 45 35 N – 10 47 40 E). Dummy 7.3 km SE of Lübeck-Blankensee airfield and 3.6 km NW of the village of Schlagsdorf. Mock-up included 2 dummy hangars and several open aircraft shelters at the SE corner of a crossroad. Decoy aircraft were parked in the area. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.617 (1944)] Remarks: Lübeck was bombed at night several times by RAF Bomber Command, particularly in 1942, but Blankensee airfield was not targeted. 9 Apr 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-47 Thunderbolts – claimed 3 x Bf 109s shot up and damaged. 24/25 Aug 44: Lübeck aviation industry targets bombed by 81 B-24 Liberators. 2-3 Feb 45: bombed – 1 x Ju 88 G-1 from I./NJG 3, plus 1 x Ju 88 G-6 from III./NJG 5 damaged on the ground. 28 Feb 45: strafed by approx. 15 P-47s and P-51s – 1 x Ju 88 destroyed, 2 x Ju 88s, 2 x He 111s and 1 x Bf 110 damaged. (German reports) 13 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ar 234s destroyed. 3 May 45: airfield taken by British troops who found it to be heavily cratered and in a state of shambles. But engineers were able to repair the runway and return Blankensee to serviceable status on 7 May, a day before the war officially ended. Operational Units: II./St.G. 162 (Apr 36 – Mar 37); St.G. 167 (Apr 37 – Mar 38); I./KG 257 (1937 – Apr 39); I./KG 26 (May-Sep 39); I./KG 28 (Feb 40); III./KG 26 (Feb-Apr 40, Aug-Sep 40); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 120 - 407 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 (Mar-Apr 40); II./KG 26 (Apr 40, Jun 43?); III./KG 26 (c. Feb-May 42); I./KG 1 (Jun 42); Stab/KG 26 (Mar-Jun 44, Sep-Oct 44); II./KG 3 (Jul 44); Stab, III./KG 40 (Sep 44 – Feb 45); III./NJG 5 (Oct 44 – May 45); 3./SG 151 (Feb 45); 12.(See)/SG 151 (Feb-Mar 45); 14./SG 151 (Feb-May 45); Stab/NJG 5 (Feb-May 45); 1.(F)/Aufkl.Gr. 22 (Apr 45); Stab/KG 76 (Apr 45); II., IV., Schulstaffel/NJG 5 (Apr-May 45); III./KG 200 (Apr-May 45); I./NJG 100 (Apr-May 45); 1.(F)/Aufkl.St. 123 (Apr-May 45); 15./SG 151 (May 45). School Units: Bomben- u.Zielfinderschule Greifswald (Mar-Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: IV./KG 26 (Mar 41 – Sep 44); Erg.KGr. LT (Sep 44 – Jan 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. (E) 68 (26 Aug – Dec 39); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 31/XI (Mar 40); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 5/XI (Apr 44 – May 45). Kommandant (not complete): Maj. Walter Loebel (1 May 39? - Oct 39; Obstlt. Gerhard Kuehn (Feb 43 ? ); Oberst Paul Neumann ( ? ? ) 8/43. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Behelfsluftpark Lübeck (1940 - ?); Koflug Lübeck-Blankensee (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 6/XI (Apr 41 – Jul 42); Koflug 7/XII (Oct 44 – Mar 45); WerftAbt.d.Lw.(o) 5/XI (spring 44 – May 45); 1., 2. and 10. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 26 (Aug 39); 10. Flugh.Betr.Kp. KG 26 (c.Mar 41); 1. and 3.Kp. Lw.-Bau-Btl. 13/XI ( ? – Sep 42); Stab Lw.-Bau-Btl. 13/XI (Sep 42 - ? ); Flieger-Geräteausgabe- und Sammelstelle 1/XI (o) (Mar 42, Aug 43, Dec 44). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.362-65 (11 Dec 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA] Lübeck-Palingen (GER) (53 51 40 N – 10 47 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) 7 km E of Lübeck in Schleswig-Holstein and immediately NW of Palingen village. History: used by training gliders. Surface and Dimensions: poor quality grass surface with trees and a pond within the boundaries of the landing area. Measurements not determined but a diagonal run of approx. 915 meters (1000 yards)might have been possible. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.593 (5 Aug 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lübeck-Schlutup (GER) (53 53 14 N – 10 47 57 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Schleswig-Holstein 8 km ENE of Lübeck city center. The landing ground was probably located just E of the town. History: no information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or meadowland. Infrastructure: none noted. - 408 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lüben (GER) (51 25 30 N – 16 11 30 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) 71 km NW of Breslau (Wrocław) in Silesia and 3.25 km NNW of Lüben. History: in existence in 1936 as a little-used landing ground, then developed into a training station for a multi-engine flight school in 1939. Dimensions: approx. 960 x 960 meters (1050 x 1050 yards) with an irregular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Equipped with perimeter and obstruction lighting for night landings. Fuel and Ammunition: there were refueling points on the N boundary. Infrastructure: had 1 large and 2 medium hangars on the N boundary with interconnected paved aprons. Numerous workshop buildings were near the hangars. A large number of separate barrack buildings and huts were just off the NW corner on open land called the Lübener Heide (Lüben Moor). The Glogau-Lüben raqil line passed close to the E boundary of the airfield. Dispersal: had 3 large open aircraft shelters off the NE corner, but no other dispersal facilities (Apr 44). Defenses: unknown. Remarks: none. Operational Units: IV./KG z.b.V. 1 (Sep 39); part of III./KG 53 (FebJun 41); I./SG 1 (Oct 44). School Units: FFS C Lüben then FFS C 15 (Jan – Sep 40); FFS C 18 then FFS B 18 (Sep 41 – Sep 44); Überprüfungstelle/Überprüfungsschule/Überprüfungslehrgang ELF Lüben (1941-43). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: 15./SG 151 (Oct 44 – Jan 45); 2./Erg.JG 1 (Nov 44 – Jan 45). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Lüben (to 1943); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 47/IV (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 47/III (1 Apr – 15 Jun 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 9/VIII (15 Jun 44 – Jan 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Werft-Abt. 56/III (1944-45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.709-11 (2 Jun 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lüchow (GER) (53 01 00 N – 11 08 45 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Lower Saxony 55 km SE of Lüneburg and c. 18 km N of Salzwedel. History: listed as operational in Feb 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: Grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Operational Units: none identified. - 409 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Überprüfungslehrgang LF Prenzlau (1941-43). Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lüchtringen (GER) (51 47 00 N – 09 26 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Lower Saxony 46.5 km E of Paderborn; airfield 1 km SE of the village. History: no information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Luckau (GER): see Alteno. Ludendorf (GER) (50 40 04 N – 06 53 53 E) General: advanced landing ground (Absprunghafen) in North Rhine – Westphalia 16 km SW of Bonn and 8 km E of Euskirchen. History: listed as operational in Jan 45. No further information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass or farm land. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ludwigsburg (GER) (48 51 54 N – 09 13 30 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 12 km NNE of Stuttgart. History: no information or mention of wartime use by the Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: Grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. Lw. Garrison and Station Units (in the city of Ludwigsburg or nearby on various dates – not complete): Stab/Flak-Rgt. 25 (Mot.) (Oct 36 – Jul 38, Aug 39 – 1940); I./Flak-Rgt. 25 (gem. mot.) (Apr 35 - ? ); schw.Flak-Abt. 251(v) (Aug 39); gem.Flak-Abt. 252(v) (Aug 39); gem.Flak-Abt. 672(v) (May 42 – 1942); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 2/VII (1944-45); Flak-Ers.Abt. 1 (Sep 40 – Apr 45); Ausbildungslager für Flakhelferinnen VII (1944-45); IV.(Flum.Ausb.)/Ln.-Rgt. beim I. Jagdkorps (Sep 43 – Aug 44)?; Stab III.(Flum.Mess)/Ln.-Rgt. 42 (LOssweil, mid-1943 – Aug 44); 10.(Offz.Ausb.)/Ln.-Rgt. 42 (c.Aug 42 – Aug 44); 5.(Flum.Ausb.)/Ln.-Abt. 201 (L-Ossweil, 1944-45); 25. (Techn.)/Ln.-Rgt. 217 (L-Ossweil, 1944-45); Kfz.Werkstatt (o) d.Lw. 103/VII (L-Ossweil, 1944-45); Aust.Btl. (OB) d.Lw. 3 (Mar 45). [Sources: Ries/Dierich; Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Ludwigslust (GER) (53 18 00 N – 11 30 20 E)

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) in Mecklenburg 102 km ESE of Hamburg, 34 km SSE of Schwerin, 26 km WSW of Parchim; airfield 3.25 km S of Ludwigslust. History: 1927 listed as an emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz). Developed into a military airfield in 1934-35 and inaugurated as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. It was used as a training station until early 1942 when it became a repair and modification center for the Heinkel aircraft firm. Reserve training and replacement units began using it in spring 1944. Dimensions: approx. 1325 x 825 meters (1450 x 900 yards) with a rectangular shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface on sandy ground making for very dusty take-off and landings in dry weather. No paved runway. Equipped with a beam approach system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points at NW and S corners. The ammunition dump was believed to be off the S corner. Infrastructure: had 3 very large hangars on the SE side of the landing area, and 1 very large and 1 large hangar in the N corner, all with paved aprons. Additionally, 2 of the hangars the SE hangar group were fronted by a 275 meter long servicing handstand. Workshops were among both hangar groups and the motor pool and garages were at the E end of the barrack area. Station flight control, meteorological office and other offices were at the SE corner. The station’s large barrack complex was NNE of the landing area along with messes and classrooms. A branch rail line served both hangar groups. Dispersal: had a Southeast dispersal area with 22 large open aircraft shelters plus 18 aircraft bays cut into a woods. Furthermore, some small open aircraft shelters were being built in the N and E corners of the field (Apr 44). Defenses: unknown. Satellites and Decoys: Ludwigslust/Ost (53 19 20 N – 11 31 00 E), satellite field 2.8 km NNE of Ludwigslust airfield. Existed before the war, but no mention found of wartime use. Remarks: 19 May 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 2 x Ju 52s and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed. 21 May 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-38s – several aircraft claimed. 3 Feb 45: strafed mid-day by 8 P-51 Mustangs – 1 x He 177, 2 x He 219, 4 x Fw 190, 1 x Ju 87 and 1 x Ar 96 destroyed; 2 x He 219, 1 x Ju 88 and 1 x Fw 190 damaged. (German report) 22 Feb 44: Ludwigslust bombed by 48 B-17 Fortresses.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: II./LG 1 (Sep-Oct 39); III./LG 1 (Nov 39 – Apr 40); Zerstörerstaffel/KG 30 (Jun-Jul 40); Luftverkehrsgruppe Ludwigslust (Jun-Dec 41); KGr. z.b.V. 172 (Apr 43); II./JG 302 (Nov 43 – Jun 44); III./JG 54 (Dec 43 – Feb 44); elements of 3./TGr. 30 (Mar-Apr 45); Stab, II./JG 1 (Apr 45); Einsatzgruppe Uhl (Apr 45). School Units: twin-engined conversion school Ludwigslust (Jul 35 – Aug 39); Arbeitsplatz for FFS (See) Warnemünde (1939); Aufklärungsschule 3 (Jul 41 – May 42); SG 111 (Jan – Mar 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.St./KG 30 (Oct 40 – Mar 41); IV./KG 30 (Apr – Jun 41); Erg.Nachtjagd-Staffel (einmot.) (Apr – Jul 44); Erg.Nachtjagd-Gr. (einmot.) (Jul – Oct 44); I./Erg.JG 2 (Nov 44 – Mar 45); Erg.Transportstaffel (Mar-Apr 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Ludwigslust (to c. Feb 43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 31/XI (c.Feb 43 – Mar 44); Flugplatzkdo. Ludwigslust of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 11/XI Parchim (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Eitel-Friedrich Roediger von Manteuffel (1 Mar 37 - 31 Mar 39); Obstlt. Georg Gerick ( ? ? ) 9/39. Station Units (on various dates – not complete): 10. Flugh.Betr.Kp./KG 30 (Nov 40 – Jun 41); Werft-Abt.(v) 113/XI (194445); Feldwerft-Abt. (mot) z.b.V. 1 (May-Oct 43). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.714-17 (17 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lüneburg (GER) (53 15 00 N – 10 27 40 E) General: airfield (Fliegerhorst) 43 km SSE of Hamburg in Lower Saxony; airfield 3.6 km E of Lüneburg. History: constructed 1935-37. The airfield was associated from 1940 with the installation and maintenance of beam navigation equipment used by pathfinder aircraft and the training of these specialized crews was carried out at Lüneburg also. Anti-shipping units were also sent here for specialized equipment installation and training. Dimensions: approx. 1150 x 1600 meters (1250 x 1750 yards) with a rectangular shape. Surface and Runways: level, good quality grass surface No paved runway. Equipped for night landings with flarepaths, perimeter and obstruction lighting, and a visual Lorenz system. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points at the servicing hardstands along the N boundary. Ammunition dump was deep in the woods off the SE corner. Infrastructure: had a total of 6 hangars – 1 very large, 4 large plus a large repair hangar, all along the N boundary and all with interconnected paved hangar aprons. A motor pool was at the NW corner and a compass swing base in front of the hangars. Barrack - 412 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 blocks, admin buildings and stores were to the N and W of the hangars. Additionally, a large military barracks (Kaserne) was approx. 1 km W of the hangar area. A light rail system served the N, E and S sides of the landing area. Dispersal: along 2 roads in woods off the NE boundary. Defenses: 1 heavy and 3 light Flak positions (mounted in towers) were around the airfield in Oct 43. Remarks: 18 Apr 44: airfield bombed by B-17 Fortresses. 3 Feb 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 9 x Fw 190s, 2 x Me 410s, 1 x Hs 126, 1 x Ju 87, 1 x Ju 88 and 2 x Fw 200s destroyed, plus 1 x Fw 190, 4 x Me 410s, 2 x Ju 87s and 1 x Fw 200 damaged. 13 Apr 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x Bf 110, 1 x He 111 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed. all unserviceable aircraft remaining on the airfield ordered blown up and burned. 18-19 Apr 45: Lüneburg taken without resistance by British 11th Armoured Div. Operational Units: Stab, II./KG 257 (Apr 38 – Apr 39); Stab, II./KG 26 (May-Aug/Sep 39); I./KG 4 (Oct 39); I./KG 1 (Oct 39 – Jan 40); Stab, II./KG 1 (Oct-Nov 39); III./KG 4 (Jan-Apr 40); KGr. 100 (FebAug 40); I./KG 40 (Apr 40); I./KG 26 (Jun 40)?; II./KG 40 (Jan-Jul 41); 7./NJG 3 (Nov 41 – Apr 43); 8./NJG 3 (Apr 43 – Apr 44); III./JG 54 (Feb-Apr 44); part of III./NJG 5 (Nov 44); Schulstaffel/NJG 1 (FebApr 45); NSGr. 1 (Nord) (Mar-Apr 45); III./JG 1 (Apr 45). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Ausb.St./KG 40 (Mar – Dec 40); Erg.Kette/KG 100 (Aug 40 – Apr 41); Erg.St./KG 40 (Apr – May 41); Erg.St./KG 26 (Aug 40 – Mar 41); Erg.St./KG 28 (Dec 40 – May 41); IV./KG 100 (Jan – Apr 42); IV./KG 6 (Mar – Nov 44); Stabsstaffel/NJG 1 (Feb – Apr 45). Station Commands: Flugstützpunktkdo. 28/XI (1941 – 12 Nov 42); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 25/XI (12 Nov 42 – Mar 44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 21/XI (Apr 44 – Apr 45). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Koflug Lüneburg (Jul 39 – Mar 41); Koflug 13/XI (Apr 41 – Feb 43); Koflug 8/VI (fall 44); Werft-Abt. (o) 36/XI (spring 44 – 1945); 4. and 5. Flgh.Betr.Kp. KG 26 (Aug 39); Luftminen-Zug 3 (Sep 44); le.Hei.Flak-Bttr. 13/XI (1944). [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.366-71 (3 Feb 44 with revisions); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Lurzenhof (GER) (48 33 45 N – 12 12 30 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) in Bavaria 5 km NE of Landshut near village of Ergolding. History: also used by gliders. No further information or mention of wartime use by the - 413 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Luftwaffe found. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Lütjenholm (GER) (54 41 05 N – 09 00 00 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) 12.5 km SSE of Leck in Schleswig-Holstein and 1.6 km W of the village of Lütjenholm. History: said to have been under construction from 1940 to 1944 and never completed or made operational. Luftwaffe units were ordered to fly to Lütjenholm the first week of May 1945 and park their aircraft in preparation for surrender to British forces. Dimensions: approx. 1600 x 1150 meters (1750 x 1250 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface. There were two intersecting paved runways, each of 985 meters (1075 yards). Both runways were incomplete and unserviceable in Feb 44. A ladder-type servicing hardstand area had been started off the NE corner but abandoned. Infrastructure: completed were a group admin and barrack buildings off the NE corner, a second group of barracks off the N boundary and clusters of small buildings at the NE corner and along the N boundary. Remarks: 8May 45: upon the surrender of German forces, the airfield had an occupancy of 66 aircraft, mostly Bf 109s and Me 110s. Operational Units: none found. For additional details go to Google and enter: Lütjenholm site:ww2.dk . Station Commands: Flugplatzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 2/XI Leck (194445). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): Wetternebenstelle Lütjenholm. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A p.372 (23 Mar 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Luxemburg (LUX): see Sandweiler. Lyck (GER) (a.k.a. today: Elk) (53 49 50 N – 22 23 45 E) General: emergency landing ground (Notlandeplatz) 95 km SSE of Insterburg (Chernyakhovsk), 49 km SW of Sudauen (Suwałki) in former East Prussia and 2 km E of Lyck. History: in existence since at least 1925. Used for the attack on Poland and then upgraded to an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in 1940-41 in preparation for the attack on the USSR in Jun 41. After the attack, used as a practice field for single-engine trainers until Jul 44 when it became a forward field for tactical reconnaissance units. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: no information found.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Operational Units: IV.(Stuka)/LG 1 (Sep 39); 1./JG 2 (Sep 39); III./KG 2 (Jun 41); Stab/NAGr. 10 (Jul-Oct 44); 2./NAGr. 4 (Jul-Oct 44); Nahaufkl.St. 13./14 (Jul-Oct 44). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 125 then FFS A 125 (Neukuhren) (1941-44). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Lyck (1940-41); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 27/XI (Apr 41 – fall 41). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): elements of Telegrafenbau-Abt. (mot) z.b.V. 1 d.Lw. (Jan-Mar 41); Lw.-Bau-Btl. 3/XI (Jun-Jul 41); elements of Lw.-Bau-Btl. 17/XIII (Jun 41); elements of Ln.-Rgt. 22 (Jun 41); Flugzeugbergungstrupp 5/VI (Jun 41); Traktorenzug 61 (Sep 41); Kw.Werkstatt d.Luftzeuggruppe 2 (Sep 41); 3.Zug of Ldssch.Kp. d.Lw. 1/I (Sep 41); Ldssch.Zug d.Lw. 107/VI (Sep 41). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.959 (1944); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk]

M Mackfitz (GER) (a.k.a. today: Makowice) (53 45 40 N – 15 17 50 E) General: initially a field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) that was upgraded to an operational airfield (Einsatzhafen I) in Pomerania 55 km NE of Stettin (Szczecin), 4 km SE of the village of Plathe (Ploty) and 1.2 km SE of the village of Mackfitz. History: built 1937-38. Used during the attack on Poland and then became a practice field for elementary trainers. Operational units arrived in December 1944 following the Soviet advance into C Poland and were heavily engaged after the Soviet winter offensive commenced on 12 Jan 45. Dimensions: approx. 730 x 1190 meters (800 x 1300 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. A perimeter road ran along the S boundary. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points existed along the S boundary and bulk fuel storage was probably in the same area. Infrastructure: had 1 large hangar with paved apron off the S boundary that was connected to the landing area by a taxiway. A small group of station buildings were off the S boundary and these included offices, barracks, stores and probably the flight control building. A branch spur off the Stettin-Regenwalde line served the S boundary. Dispersal: no organized dispersal facilities (Mar 44).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 Defenses: unknown. Remarks: 29 May 44: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 7 x He 177s destroyed. Operational Units: I./ZG 1 (Aug-Sep 39); 1./NAGr. 8 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); II./SG 1 (Dec 44 – Feb 45); Stab, 1./NAGr. 3 (Feb-Mar 45); 4. (H)/Aufkl.Gr. 31 (Feb-Mar 45); 2., 3./SG 9 (Mar-Apr 45). School Units: Arbeitsplatz for FFS A/B 118 then FFS A 118 (StettinAltdamm) (1940-44); 3./JG 103 (Jan 44 – Jan 45); 1./JG 103 (Dec 44 – Feb 45). Station Commands: Fl.H.Kdtr. Mackfitz (1939 - ? ); Fl.H.Kdtr. E 2/IV z.b.V. (1939-40); Platzkdo. of A(o) 6/III Stettin-Altdamm (1944-45); Fl.H.Kdtr. E(v) 253/III (1945). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.718-19 (18 Jun 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Magdeburg (GER) (52 07 50 N – 11 37 43 E) Lw. Garrison and Station Units (on various dates and not specifically identified with the airfield – not complete): Antiaircraft (Flak): Higher Flak Commands: none. Stab/Flak-Rgt.: Stab/Flak-Rgt. 22 (as Flakgruppe Magdeburg , Sep 39 – Mar 40); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 52 (Aug 39, then as Flakgruppe Magdeburg, Oct 40 – 1945); Stab/Flakscheinw.Rgt. 108 (as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Magdeburg, Mar 44 – 1945); Stab/Flak-Rgt. 136 (as Flakgruppe Magdeburg , 1939-40)? Flak-Abt.: I./Flak-Rgt. 42 (c.Oct 43 – Jan 44); I./Flak-Rgt. 52 (Nov 38 – Aug 39); gem.124 (1939-40); gem.125 (1939-41); 3./s.132 (Jul 44 – 1945); 5./s.154 (Jul 44 – 1945); gem.166 (1941)?; 1./s.176 (Feb 44 – 1945); 5./s.262 (? – Dec 43); 3., 4./s.272 (Jul 44 – 1945); part of s.279 (Eisb.) (Mar-Apr 44, JunSep 44); part of s.313 (May-Sep 44); 1., 2./gem.316 (Aug 44 – 1945); 5./s.335 (Apr-May 44); s.418 (Eisb.) (Jul-Aug 44); s.434 (1942/43 – Mar 44); s.464 (Feb-Mar 44); part of gem.476 (Apr 44 – 1945); s.521 (Aug 39); s.535 (Eisb.) (1943 – Dec 43); s.537 (c.1942 – Jul 44); s.539 (Oct 43 – 1945); 3., 5./s.602 (? – Dec 43); s.660 (May 42); part of le.727 (1942/43 – Oct 44); 1./le.821 (Eisb.) (Dec 43 – May 44); le.827 (Jan 42 – 1945). Flakscheinwerfer-Abt.: 179 (Mar 44 – 1945); 583 (Feb 44 – 1945); 587 (Nov 43 – 1945); 709 (May 44 – 1945); 710 (Jun-Jul 44). Luftsperr-Abt.: part of 104 (? – 1945); 5./210 (May-Jul 44). Alarm-Flak: 2-4 batteries during 1943-44. Heimat-Flak: as many as 33 batteries during 1943-44. - 416 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 z.b.V. Batterien: 10-21 plus 15 z.b.V. searchlight batteries during 1943-44. Other Flak: Flak-Waffenwerkstatt (o) 6/III (1943-45). Flak-Ers./Flak-Ausb.: Flak-Ers.Abt. 7 (Aug 39 – 1945); FlakErs.Abt. 52 (Aug 39 – Apr 41). Air Raid Protection/Civil Defense (Luftschutz): Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 11 (May-Oct 40); Flakwaffenwerkstatt (o) 6/III (1944-45); Luftschutz-Abt. d.Lw. 48 (1943-45); Air Force Signals (Luftnachrichten): Stab II/Ln.-Flugmelde-Rgt. 93 (1943 – Sep 44); 19./Ln.-Flugmelde-Rgt. 93 (c.1943 – Sep 44); 24.(Flum.Leit)/Ln.-Rgt. 204 (May 43 – Aug 44); Fluko Magdeburg (n.d.). Construction (Bau): 3./Lw.-Bau-Btl. 130/I (1945). Other (sonstige, verschiedene): Lw.-Berge-Btl. VI (1944); Lw.Auskunftsstelle 3/III (1943-45); Ersatz-Btl. für Ostfreiwillige d.Lw. (1945). Remarks: 17-18 Apr 45: city attacked and taken by U.S. 30th Infantry Div. and 2nd Armored Div. Magdeburg (Flughafen) (GER) (52 08 09 N – 11 41 00 E) General: airport (Flughafen) in Anhalt 3 km ENE of Magdeburg and located on a former military exercise field; not believed to have been used by main-line Luftwaffe flying units during the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Magdeburg-Ost (GER) (52 07 50 N – 11 42 50 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Anhalt 5.25 km E of Magdeburg. History: a pre-war civil landing ground that was taken over by the Luftwaffe in 1934-35 and developed into a military airfield. It was used mainly for flight training during the war. Dimensions: approx. 1100 x 915 meters (1200 x 1000 yards) and irregular in shape. Surface and Runways: grass surface with rough spots. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling points were inside the S boundary and at the SW corner. A small ammunition dump was at the SE corner. Infrastructure: had 2 large and 3 medium hangars along the N boundary with interconnected paved aprons and servicing hardstands. Workshops, repair shops, an engine repair facility and engine test beds were grouped behind and W of the hangars. The station offices, barracks, messes, etc., were also on the N side of the airfield and the - 417 -

Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 flight control building was in the NW corner. A branch rail spur off the Magdeburg-Berlin line probably served the W boundary of the landing area. Dispersal: there were 6 large open aircraft shelters on the perimeter of the field (Apr 44). Defenses: protechted by 1 heavy Flak position with 6 guns and 1 light Flak position in Aug 43. Remarks: Magdeburg was repeatedly bombed beginning in Sep 40 by both the RAF and the USAAF, but the targets were oil refineries, munitions plants and the city’s marshaling yards. The airfields were apparently not targeted by the heavy bombers. 2 Mar 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 9 x He 111s, 2 x Ju 88s and 4 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 10 x He 111s, 2 x Ju 88s, 1 x Ju 188, 3 x unidentified aircraft damaged. 3 Mar 45: low-level attack by VIII Fighter Command P-51s – claimed 1 x He 111, 5 x Ju 88s, 1 x Do 217 and 1 x unidentified aircraft destroyed, plus 2 x Ju 88s damaged. 18 Apr 45: Magdeburg taken by U.S. 9th Army after several days of resistance and a heavy air attack by medium bombers. Operational Units: II./JG 27 (Jan-Feb 40); III./JG 2 (Mar-Apr 40); KGr. z.b.V. 101 (May 40); KGr. z.b.V. 105 (May-Jul 40). School Units: elementary flight school Magdeburg-Ost (Jan 34 – Mar 39); Fl.Ausbildungs-Rgt. 21 (1939-41); Schule/FAR 21 (Apr – Dec 39); Arbeitsplatz for FFS C 16 then FFS B 16 (Burg bei Magdeburg) (May 40 – Apr 45); I./FFS A 125 (Jan - Mar 45); Jagdfliegerschule 2 (Jun 40 – 1941); 3./JG 102 (Feb 43 – Jul 44); Lw.-Fachschule (1941-44). Reserve Training & Replacement Units: Erg.Zerst.Gr. (Apr – Jun 40). Station Commands: as Fl.H. Magdeburg-Ost (3/43); Fl.Pl.Kdo. A 29/III (1943-44); Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/III (1944-45). Kommandant (not complete): Obstlt. Hans-Karl Krüger (Mar 43 ? ). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): TransportFliegerführer 1 (Apr 44); Transport-Fliegerführer 2 (Sep 43); Koflug 3/III (c.Feb 44 – Apr 45); Werft-Abt. 27/III (1944-45); Werft-Kp. 56 (n.d.); Lw.-Sanitäts-Abt. 3/III (c.Feb 44 – Apr 45). [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.720-23 (25 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Magdeburg-Rothensee (GER) (52 11 N – 11 39 E) General: practice field (Arbeitsplatz) in Anhalt 7 km NNE of Magdeburg. History: no operational units are known to have been stationed there. Used as a fuel storage facility during the war. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface. Infrastructure: none noted. School Units: Arbeitsplatz for Schule/FAR 21 (1939).

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: Mattiello; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Magdeburg-Süd (GER) (52 04 35 N – 11 37 40 E) General: operational airfield (Einsatzhafen) in Anhalt 126 km WSW of Berlin 6 km S of Magdeburg. History: built 1934-35 and inaugurated as a Luftwaffe Fliegerhorstkommandantur by fall 1935. The airfield’s wartime use is something of a mystery. It was used for flight training at the very beginning of the war and then at the very end, but its use from 194044 is unknown. Dimensions: approx. 825 x 685 meters (900 x 750 yards) and roughly rectangular in shape. Surface and Runways: good grass surface. No paved runway. A perimeter road ran along the N boundary. Fuel and Ammunition: refueling point were on the servicing hardstands and underground bulk fuel storage was reportedly on the N boundary. Infrastructure: had 2 medium hangars on the N boundary with paved aprons, and 1 medium hangar on the S boundary that may have been a portable-type. Projecting out into the landing area from the hangars on the N boundary were 5 strips of servicing hardstands. Separate workshop buildings were in the hangar area on the N side of the field. A few station buildings were also on the N boundary and the station control tower was in the NW corner. A barrack complex with some 28 buildings was 1.2 km N of the N boundary. The nearest rail connection was 1.2 km E of the airfield. Dispersal: no organized dispersal area. Defenses: mainly covered by the Magdeburg city Flak defenses, but the airfield did have 3 light Flak positions in the SE corner of the airfield in Dec 43. Remarks: Magdeburg was repeatedly bombed beginning in Sep 40 by both the RAF and the USAAF, but the targets were oil refineries, munitions plants and the city’s marshaling yards. The airfields were apparently not targeted by the heavy bombers. Operational Units: 8.(Pz.)/Bü 181 (Apr 45). School Units: FFS A/B 2 (Oct – Dec 39); II./FFS A 125 (Jan - Mar 45). Station Commands: Koflug 3/III; Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 13/III; Platzkdo. of Fl.H.Kdtr. A(o) 16/III Zerbst (1944-45). Kommandant (mainly prior to the establishment of numbered station commands – not complete): Obstlt. Alfred Sturm (1 Jan 35 - 30 Sep 36). Station Units (on various dates – not complete): none identified.

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 [Sources: AFHRA A5258 pp.724-26 (25 Apr 44); chronologies; BAMA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Mahlberg (GER) (48 18 15 N – 07 47 15 E) General: field airstrip (Feldflugplatz) in Baden-Württemberg 31 km N of Freiburg, 6 km SSW of Lahr and 2.5 km NE of the village of Mahlberg. History: began operation in October 1944 as an alternate strip for fighters engaged in the Freiburg-Strasbourg area. Surface and Dimensions: grass surface measuring approx. 1000 x 90 meters (1100 x 100 yards). No praved runway. Infrastructure: none. Nearest rail connection 1.6 km E (W?) on the Basle – Strasbourg line. Dispersal: aircraft sheltered in woods at the NE corner. Remarks: none. Operational Units: none identified. Station Commands: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5258 p.257 (13 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Mahlen (GER) (52 47 50 N – 09 10 30 E) General: emergency landing ground and dispersal airfield (Notlandeplatz und Ausweichplatz) in Lower Saxony 41 km SSE of Bremen, 15 km SSW of Verden and 2 km WNW of Mahlen village. History: under active development in fall 1944, probably as an advanced landing ground for fighters operating in the Bremen area. Dimensions: 1235 x 230 meters (1350 x 250 yards). Surface and Runways: grass surface. No paved runway. Fuel and Ammunition: probably brought in when needed. Infrastructure: none. When used, personnel probably billeted in the barracks at Hoya airfield and in the local villages. Remarks: does not appear to have received much attention from the Allies – no mention of significant air attacks found. Operational Units: none identified. [Sources: AFHRA A5257A pp.373 (1 Oct 44); chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA] Maierhof (GER): a.k.a. Passau? ( ?? ) General: tactical landing ground (Gefechtslandeplatz) in Bavaria located west of Passau, but exact location and other details are not known. See Passau for further details. However, there was a Mayrhof (Austrian spelling) across the Danube 2.6 km SE of Passau. [Sources: Ries/Dierich; chronologies; BA-MA; NARA; PRO/NA; web site ww2.dk] Mainbullau (GER) (49 41 40 N – 09 11 00 E) General: landing ground (Landeplatz) in Bavaria 44 km SE of Darmstadt, 5 km WSW of Miltenberg and just NW of the village of Mainbullau. History: laid out c. 1937 with a grass surface and

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Luftwaffe Airfields 1935-45 measurments of approx. 550 x 230 meters (600 x 250 yards). Rarely if ever used by the Luftwaffe until 1944 when it was used as a parking area for aircraft not in use (Abstellplatz). Remarks: 10 Sep 44: low-level at