2018 Syllabus

Engineering Hydrology: Principles and Practices. Prentice Hall College Div, 640 p. ISBN 978- ... 2018 Syllabus 10 Aquatic chemistry ... analytical too...

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2018 Syllabus Update: 2017 July 17th

Table of contents

Overview of the program ____________________________________________________ 2

2018 schedule ____________________________________________________________ 3

List of modules

Cross cultural communication (LE0201) ________________________________________ 4 Water: current needs and further challenges (AE0201) _____________________________ 5 Water policy and governance (AE0202)_________________________________________ 7 Watershed hydrology (AE0203) _______________________________________________ 8 Aquatic chemistry (GE0203) ________________________________________________ 10 Environmental biogeochemistry (AE0205) ______________________________________ 12 Stream hydrology (AE02XX) ________________________________________________ 14 Hydrogeology (GE0202)____________________________________________________ 16 Surface water and groundwater modelling (AEXXXX) _____________________________ 18 GIS applied to water and environmental management (AE0204) ____________________ 20 Water management across agroecosystems (AE0207) ___________________________ 22 Ecological engineering applied to water management (AE0206) ____________________ 24 Field trip (AE0209) ________________________________________________________ 26 Water quality monitoring (AE0208) ___________________________________________ 27 Water pollution and remediation (GE0205) _____________________________________ 29 International seminars (AA4306) _____________________________________________ 30 French as a Foreign Language (LE0202) ______________________________________ 31

Example of a transcript of academic record _____________________________________ 32

About suggested readings References beginning with the  symbol are available in the library.

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

1

Overview of the program Number of hours Topic

Module

Water : current needs and further challenges

L

PW

13

9

Cross cultural communication

FW

12

Context Water policy and governance

20

International seminars

9

Watershed hydrology

6

15

Hydrogeology

9

6

20

3

Environmental biogeochemistry

12

12

Stream hydrology

9

12

GIS applied to water and environmental management

2

20

Surface water and groundwater modelling

3

18

Water quality monitoring

3

16

3

Ecological engeneering applied to water management

12

4

8

Water management across agroecosystems

14

9

Water pollution and remediation

15

2

Theoretical and Aquatic chemistry applied sciences

Monitoring and modelling tools

Mitigation & conservation

Field trip

3

4

40

L: Lectures PW: Practical works in classroom or computer room FW: Field work Please note that the number of hours is susceptible to be slightly modified.

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

2

2018 schedule

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

3

Cross cultural communication (LE0201) 1 ECTS

Developing communication and project management skills in a multi-cultural team

Aim Raising awareness and developing skills around culture and its impact on behavior in international teams. Students will draw on their own experience of learning within a multi-cultural team immersed in a host culture.

Program 

Culture: definitions, metaphors; key concepts. Culture as a source of intercultural errors



Cross cultural communication: "Talk to me"



Managing an international team: “When in Rome ... “ (case study; video)



Cultural perceptions of water case study: description of geographical location, identification of stakeholders, proposal of technical and legal solutions



Student reports: results of expatriate manager interview



Student presentations of cross cultural training packages



Independent/group work on assignments and projects

Learning outcomes Upon successful completion of the workshop, students will be able to: 

Develop a better understanding of their own culture



Explain how stereotypes are formed



Understand how and why miscommunication happens



Identify cross-cultural and intercultural perceptions of water management issues

Assessment method Group assignment and oral defense.

Prerequisites No prerequisite.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: Martine Rey (Ph.D.), Associate Professor, Languages & Cultural Studies. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

4

Water: current needs and further challenges (AE0201) 2 ECTS

A geography of water resources and of key issues to be addressed.

Aim This module is designed to be an introduction of the Spring Semester. Students will be initiated to the different stakes regarding water management that have to be challenged.

Program 

Water Atlas in Africa



Geography of water resources; water and health Geography of current water resources



Human impacts on water ressources



Indices of water scarcity



Water needs by economic activities and by nation level of development



Current and future threats to water resources (degradation of freshwater ecosystem, contamination, overexploration, climate change, etc.)

Learning outcomes 

Discuss the disparity between localization of water needs and of water resources



Describe the methods to assess water scarcity



Describe the different threats to water resources



Use web-GIS like ArcGis Online to display table data on maps

Assessment method Oral defense of a case study.

Prerequisites No prerequisite.

Suggested readings  Brooks, K.N., Folliott, P.F.& Magner, J.A., 2012. Hydrology and the Management of Watersheds. WileyBlackwell, 552 p. ISBN 978-0-470-96305-0.

Faculty and staff Coordinator: Romain ARMAND (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in surface hydrology and GIS. Contact: [email protected]

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Lecturer: Stanley Mubako (Ph. D.), Research Assistant Professor at Center for Environmental Resource Management, University of Texas at El Paso, USA.

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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Water policy and governance (AE0202) 2 ECTS

Which instruments allow to supervise water management and to improve water services?

Aim Water governance is defined by the political, social, economic and administrative systems that are in place, and which directly or indirectly affect the use, development and management of water resources and the delivery of water service delivery at different levels of society (UNDP). This module will give to students an overview of water governance: social, economic, politic and environmental dimensions will be studied.

Program 

Stakeholders involved in water use and management



Territorial management of water



Pressure analysis



Water quantity and quality standards



Cost / benefits analysis of water conservation measures

Learning outcomes 

Describe the different stakeholders related to water supply, use and management



Discuss the different tools to regulate water management and water conservation



Realize a short economic study of water management

Prerequisites No prerequisites

Assessment method Individual report.

Faculty and staff Coordinator: Romain ARMAND (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in surface hydrology and GIS. Contact: [email protected] Lecturers: Nicolas FERMIN, in charge of water economy, Wallonia public service department, Belgium. Frank A. Ward (Ph. D.): Professor in water policy, New Mexico State University, USA.

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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Watershed hydrology (AE0203) 2 ECTS

Which processes are controlling the partition of rainfall?

Aim The students will be familiarized with the processes explaining the partition of water in several hydrological fluxes (infiltration, runoff, recharge, evaporation). These processes will be studied at the catchment scale. The effect of soil surface state on runoff/infiltration partition will be specifically discussed because anthropogenic activities (crops, farming practices, urbanization, soil sealing, etc.) are permanently affecting the surface conditions and therefore the water fluxes.

Program 

Water cycle



Rainfall data acquisition (gauges)



Rainfall losses ( interception, storage, infiltration )



Runoff / infiltration partition



Morphometric indexes of catchment



Flood generation



Water balance at the catchment scale

Learning outcomes 

Explain the surface hydrological processes and how they are affected by soil surface state



Describe these hydrological processes by means of equations



Delineate the catchment area based on topographic maps or data



Interpret rainfall data



Realize water balance

Assessment method Written examination.

Prerequisites No prerequisite.

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Suggested readings  Brooks, K.N., Folliott, P.F., et Magner, J.A., 2012. Hydrology and the Management of Watersheds. WileyBlackwell, 552 p. ISBN 978-0-470-96305-0.

 Hendriks, M., 2010. Introduction to Physical Hydrology. Oxford, 352 p. ISBN 978-0-19-929684-2. Ponce, V.M., 1989. Engineering Hydrology: Principles and Practices. Prentice Hall College Div, 640 p. ISBN 9780-13-277831-2.

 Rodda, H., et Little, M., 2015. Understanding Mathematical and Statistical Techniques in Hydrology: An Examples-based Approach. Wiley-Blackwell, 112 p. ISBN 978-1-4443-3549-1.

 Ward, A.D., Trimble, S.W., Burckhard, S.R., et Lyon, J.G., 2015. Environmental Hydrology, Third Edition. CRC Press : 320 p. ISBN 978-1-4665-8941-4.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: Romain ARMAND (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in surface hydrology and GIS. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

9

Aquatic chemistry (GE0203) 2 ECTS

How chemical processes are controlling water composition?

Aim Across the aquatic system (rivers, oceans, lakes, groundwater), natural water presents differences in its composition. Several processes are driving the chemical composition of water system and their knowledge allows defining the hydrogeochemical context, based on present species and on geological background. Studying the hydrogeochemical context is essential to detect chemical anomalies in water composition which may be an indication of severe pollution.

Program 

Natural water composition



Chemical data and analysis



Chemical water composition governing processes



Natural hydrochemical processes (complexation, redox, hydrolysis, surface reaction)

Learning outcomes 

Describe the (geo)chemical processes affecting water mineral composition



Discuss how the presence of individual species, and their interactions, will affect the overall chemistry of a complex environmental system



Represent water mineral composition with specific charts (Piper diagram).

Assessment method Written examination.

Prerequisites 

Chemistry

Suggested readings  Langmuir, D. (1997) Aqueous Environmental Geochemistry. Prentice Hall, Upper Sadle River, New Jersey.  Stumm, W. and Morgan, J.J. (1996) Aquatic Chemistry, 3rd ed. Wiley Intersciences, New York.

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Faculty and staff Coordinator:

Olivier

POURRET

(Ph.D.),

Associate

Professor

in

geochemistry.

Contact:

[email protected] Guest lecturer: Raul E. MARTINEZ (Ph. D), Assistant Professor for Biogeochemistry and Aqueous Geochemistry. University of Freiburg, Germany. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

11

Environmental biogeochemistry (AE0205) 2 ECTS

How soil processes affect biogeochemical cycles within the Earth’s Critical Zone?

The Earth’s Critical Zone is defined as “heterogeneous, near surface environment in which complex interactions involving rock, soil, water, air, and living organisms regulate the natural habitat and determine the availability of lifesustaining resources”. Understanding the functioning of soil, the core of the Earth’s Critical Zone, is therefore essential to well constrain biogeochemical cycling of chemical elements and pollutants. Soils are heterogeneous systems with many important reactions occurring at the interface between solid, liquid and gas phases. Soils also constitute a place of interactions with many anthropogenic inputs such as fertilizers. This course focuses on the main soil biogeochemical processes that control the transfer of chemical elements through environment and their consequences on environment and water quality. The course will cover the fundamentals of solute-solid interactions, biogeochemical cycles of elements and impacts of agricultural practices on water and environmental quality. Real issues related to the transfer of elements within the soil-water continuum as well as current research in the field of critical zone science will be explored through independent literature research and class discussion.

Program 

Concept of Earth’s Critical Zone



Biogeochemical cycles (N, P, Ca, Mg, Si …) within the Earth’s Critical Zone



Isotope geochemistry and it significance to study biogeochemical cycles



Factors affecting element transfer across environment



Impacts of agricultural N and P inputs on water and environmental quality

Learning outcomes 

Characterize biogeochemical cycles and fluxes of elements across different reservoirs using innovative

analytical tools (e.g. stable isotopes) 

Discuss how human activities may affect biogeochemical cycles



Discuss how agriculture practices impact water and environmental quality

Assessment method Individual written examination.

Prerequisites 

Introduction to soil science



Analytical chemistry

Suggested readings  Botkin, D.B., et Keller, E.A., 2014. Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet. John Wiley & Sons, 688 p. ISBN 978-1-118-42732-3. Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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 Brady, N.C. & Weil, R.R., 2002. The nature and properties of soils. Prentice Hall, 960 p. ISBN 978-0-13016763-7.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: David HOUBEN (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in soil science and biogeochemistry. Contact: [email protected] Guest lecturer: Sophie OPFERGELT (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in soil science and isotope geochemistry, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

13

Stream hydrology (AE02XX) 2 ECTS

How to assess the stream response to natural and anthropic factors?

Aim Rivers are providing essential services to human people: irrigation, drinking water, power, industries, shipping, wildlife habitats, etc. Rivers are also feeding wetlands with water and thus strongly control the status of these hotspots of biodiversity. The upstream areas and the river networks have been considerably disturbed by anthropogenic activities (landuse changes, dams, channelization, excess water abstraction, etc). This results in changes of stream morphology and affects the natural flow regime which alters the previously mentioned services.

In this module, students will be trained to the processes occurring at the river scale. They will be able to identify which environmental parameters are controlling the natural flow regime. They will then be introduced to the different effects of human infrastructures on the hydrological regime and the resulting morphologies. A focus will be done on the different computational methods which allow to assess the environmental flow which refers to “a flow regime designed to maintain a river in some agreed ecological condition” (Smakhtin 2007, Hydrological Processes, 21, 2007).

Program 

Hydrological regimes



Fluvial systems



Alluvial transport and processes



Effect of human infrastructures on river flow



On site discharge measurement



Computing environmental flow

Check out our blog.

Learning outcomes 

Describe the different morphologies of river systems and the contributing factors



Understand the factors which are controlling spatial and temporal variability of flow



Measure the flow velocity on a small stream section and assess the global discharge



Decide on an admissible management strategy for allocating environmental flow



Assess the environmental flow potentials/requirements by several techniques

Assessment method Group field report / individual examination.

Prerequisites 

Microsoft Excel handling skills

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Suggested readings  Hauer, F.R., Lamberti, G.A., 2017. Methods in Stream Ecology: Volume 1: Ecosystem Structure, 3rd ed. Academic Press.

 Hendriks, M., 2010. Introduction to Physical Hydrology. Oxford, 352 p. ISBN 978-0-19-929684-2.  Ward, A.D., Trimble, S.W., Burckhard, S.R., et Lyon, J.G., 2015. Environmental Hydrology, Third Edition. CRC Press : 320 p. ISBN 978-1-4665-8941-4.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: Romain ARMAND (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in surface hydrology and GIS. Contact: [email protected] Guest Lecturer: Ali GÜL (Ph. D.), Associate Professor, Hydraulics Division, Dokuz Eylül University, Turkey. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

15

Hydrogeology (GE0202) 2 ECTS

How to determine the physical properties of an aquifer?

Aim Groundwater constitutes a major water resource, especially for countries located in arid and semi-arid contexts. Student will be familiarized with theoretical knowledge of aquifers properties (which determine the water flows) and with field methods, thanks to our well field close to the campus and of our newly developed hydrogeology facilities. This module is designed to give a very practical introduction to “Flow and transports in groundwater”.

Program 

Aquifers typology (porous, fractured, karst, coastal) and geography



Hydrodynamic parameters of aquifers: permeability, transmissivity, diffusivity.



Groundwater hydraulics



Assessment of aquifer recharge



Issues regarding aquifers (subsidence, seawater intrusion, pollution, etc.)



Piezometric and sampling campaign around the on-site hydrogeology platform

Learning outcomes 

Describes the different types of aquifer and the impact on hydrodynamic parameters



Discuss the susceptibility to issues, according to physical and geographical information



Realize basic monitoring operations: depth measurement, water sampling.



Solving exercises: compute water flow between two wells, draw piezometric map and assess the direction of water flow

Assessment method Written examination.

Prerequisites No prerequisite.

Suggested readings  Hendriks, M., 2010. Introduction to Physical Hydrology. Oxford, 352 p. ISBN 978-0-19-929684-2.  Karamouz, M., Ahmadi, A., et Akhbari, M., 2011. Groundwater hydrology: engineering, planning, and management. CRC Press, 649 p. ISBN 978-1-4398-3756-6.

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Faculty and staff Coordinator: Lahcen Zouhri (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in hydrogeology. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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Surface water and groundwater modelling (AEXXXX) 2 ECTS

How to model the fate of water and associated contaminants in the hydrosystem?

Aim Despite the monitoring activities carried out on water bodies regarding their quality and quantity properties, water management needs analysis which take spatial and temporal variability of hydrological factors into account. These data can be processed in Geographical Information Software (GIS) which are relevant tools to store, analyze and visualize large datasets. In this module, students will be trained to the FREEWAT platform for sustainable water resource management. This platform runs in the open-source GIS “QGIS,” and it may be used to simulate the hydrological cycle, hydrochemical or economic-social processes. It integrates a wide range of USGS MODFLOW family codes. Students will be able to produce maps and documents which are essential in decisions making related to water management.

Program 

Basic handling of QGIS



Training to FREEWAT (Free and Open Source Software Tools for Water Resource Management) NB: FREEWAT is an HORIZON 2020 project financed by the EU Commission)



Groundwater numerical modeling



Solute transport in groundwater and the unsaturated zone



Water management in the rural environment



Sensitivity analysis and calibration



Several case studies devoted to the application of the European Water Framework or to rural water management

Learning outcomes 

Understand how theoretical knowledge are transpose in GIS-based models



Use a spatially distributed and physically based model



Realize a sensitivity analysis



Analyze and discuss results processed by simulation

Prerequisites 

Aquatic chemistry



Hydrogeology



Watershed hydrology

Assessment method Exam in computer classroom. Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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Faculty and staff Coordinator: Romain ARMAND (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in surface hydrology and GIS. Contact: [email protected] Guest lecturer: Rudy ROSSETTO (Ph. D), Institute of Life Sciences, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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GIS applied to water and environmental management (AE0204) 2 ECTS

How to create synthetic maps to obtain an accurate overview of watershed management?

Aim Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are software commonly used to study water issues on a wide range of topics (watershed management, groundwater, floods, etc.). GIS constitute a focal tool which aggregates data from different sources and scales. In this module, students will be initiated to the ArcGIS software and to general GIS files (vectors, rasters and tables). Basic skills will be taught (data handling, mapping) and a focus will be done on the use of hydrological dataset. The module will be designed to facilitate future use of other GIS than ArcGIS software. NB: French students from MSc “Agroecology, soil and Water conservation” will also attend this module.

Program 

Introduction to the different types of data



Software basic handling



Realization of a map: which information should be provided?



Extraction of dataset from web libraries (USGS)



Use of elevation dataset (SRTM)



Creation of topographical and hydrological raster files: slope, indexes (Beven-Kirkby, TPI), catchment delineation, direction and accumulation flow, stream network generation



Export (other GIS, web-based solutions)



Use of GPS device and import into the software



Application to watershed management and water resources management

Learning outcomes 

Describe the different GIS data



Realize maps



Create hydrological data from elevation dataset



Search and download on-line free dataset

Assessment method Exam on computer.

Prerequisites No prerequisites

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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Suggested readings  Dixon, B., et Uddameri, V., 2015. GIS and Geocomputation for Water Resource Science and Engineering. Wiley-Blackwell: 504 p. ISBN 978-1-118-35413-1.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: Romain ARMAND (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in surface hydrology and GIS. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

21

Water management across agroecosystems (AE0207) 2 ECTS

How to adapt farming practices to reduce agricultural impacts on water quality?

Aim Agricultural practices, especially the use of nutrients and plant-health products, can degrade chemical quality of surface water and of groundwater. This module is designed to provide an agronomy background to students to understand how farmers may conciliate their yield goals, crop needs and water quality. A focus on major nutrients (nitrates and phosphorus) will be done. This theoretical knowledge will be applied to the Pisa floodplain (Italy) where different crop systems or land use managements are tested to identify the impacts of farming practices on water quality. This area is illustrative of Mediterranean coastal areas periurban dynamics (urban sprawl, land abandonment).

Program 

Introduction to agronomy



Nutrient balance



Regulatory context of farming practices regarding water quality



Overview of agro-environmental measures in the EU



Hydrology applied to agroecosystems



Fate of phosphorus: anthropogenic and natural sources; transfer and impact on water quality



Use of spatialized modelling tools

Learning outcomes 

Describe the interaction between farming practices and water quality



Describe the agro-environmental measures that may be used to conserve water quality



Realize a nutrient balance

Assessment method Written examination.

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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Prerequisites 

Aquatic chemistry



Soil hydrology



Environmental biogeochemistry

Suggested readings  Botkin, D.B., et Keller, E.A., 2014. Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet. John Wiley & Sons, 688 p. ISBN 978-1-118-42732-3.  Brady, N.C. & Weil, R.R., 2002. The nature and properties of soils. Prentice Hall, 960 p. ISBN 978-0-13016763-7.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: Elisa MARRACCINI (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in agronomy and geo-agronomy. Contact: [email protected] Guest lecturer: Nicola SILVESTRI (Ph. D), Associate Professor in agronomy. University of Pisa, Italy. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

23

Ecological engineering applied to water management (AE0206) 2 ECTS

What are applications of wetland ecosystems and functional plant traits in ecological engineering?

Aim In this module, students will be familiarized with ecological engineering, in particular influence of plant species diversity and plant traits on the physical and biogeochemical processes of water and nutrient flows. Natural areas such as wetlands will be particularly studied as they are high biodiversity ecosystems and present functions in water protection. Therefore, wetlands are particularly focused by stakeholders and are concerned by conservation measures. Land planning is now enhanced by the possibilities of plant-based engineering. Artificial wetland may be used for wastewater phyto-treatment technologies. Runoff and erosion in agricultural catchments can be reduced by herbaceous hedges inspired by plant morphology and other properties. NB: French students from MSc “Agroecology, soil and Water conservation” will also attend this module.

Program 

Functional ecology of wetland and ecosystem services



Ecological engineering of water treatment



Ecosystem services of aquatic crop, the case of watercress crop



Presentation of homework from bibliography in Ecological Engineering



Management of reduction of soil erosion



Field trip in Saint Valéry en Caux (Normandy)

Learning outcomes 

Describe the functional role of different types of plants in wetlands



Describe the key processes of importance for nutrient removal in wetlands



Discuss the choice of techniques to reduce the impacts of runoff through a case study

Assessment method Individual assignment and short individual exam.

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Prerequisites 

Ecology



Botany



Soil sciences



Hydrology

Suggested readings  Botkin, D.B., et Keller, E.A., 2014. Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet. John Wiley & Sons, 688 p. ISBN 978-1-118-42732-3.

 Morgan, R.P.C., 2005. Soil Erosion and Conservation. Wiley-Blackwell, 316 p. ISBN 978-1-4051-1781-4.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: Michel-Pierre FAUCON (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in plant ecology and restoration ecology. Contact: [email protected] Guest lecturer: Freddy REY (Ph. D.), Research Director in ecological engineering. IRSTEA, Grenoble, France. Contact:

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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Field trip (AE0209) 2 ECTS

Study and visit of sites presenting specific water management facilities or issues.

Program Program of field trip is still under construction. In 2016, the field trip took place in Alsace, at the eastern border of France. Several case study were visited with invited speakers: -

The impacts of the Rhine channelization on the sediment supply and the dynamic of riparian ecosystems.

-

The land planning of Strasbourg city related to the Rhine dynamics (bike tour).

-

Soil conservation and mitigation of erosion of agricultural lands in hilly areas.

Insights of the field trip can be checked out on this link.

Prerequisites No prerequisites.

Assessment method Group assignment and oral defense.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: Romain ARMAND (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in surface hydrology and GIS. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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Water quality monitoring (AE0208) 2 ECTS

How to assess the ecological and physicochemical quality of water systems?

Aim Determining water quality is a key question in the EU where Water Framework Directive (WFD) aims at achieving an ecological and chemical “good status” of all water bodies. In this module, we will focus on superficial water bodies (e.g.: rivers and lakes) and the way to assess the status of their biological and physico-chemical status by means of sampling, indicators and laboratory analysis. Anthropogenic perturbations (sewage effluents, agricultural practices) and their effects on water quality will be particularly studied. Stream station(s) near Beauvais will be used to perform water and biological samples.

Program 

Animal and vegetal bio-indicators



Review of water biological quality indexes



In-site physico-chemical measurement (multiparametric probe)



Macro-invertebrates sampling in stream stations near Beauvais



Recognition of the taxonomic rank of sampled macro-invertebrates



Determination of biological index of the selected stream station(s)



Lab measurements of physico-chemical parameters (pH, Nitrate, Chlorine, etc.)



Introduction to sensors involved in monitoring of water properties

Learning outcomes 

Explain the location of the sampling site depending on expected anthropogenic perturbation



Assessing first ecological level of a water system



Measuring basic physico-chemical parameters of water samples



Discuss the effects of environmental and anthropogenic factors on biological index or physico-chemical parameters

Assessment method Group assignment.

Prerequisites 

Aquatic chemistry

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Suggested readings  Martin, J.L., 2014. Hydro-Environmental Analysis: Freshwater Environments. CRC Press, Boca Raton : 567 p. ISBN 978-1-4822-0607-4.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: Anne-Maïmiti MERCADAL (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in animal ecology. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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Water pollution and remediation (GE0205) 2 ECTS

How to characterize a water pollution and propose specific remediation techniques?

Aim Preventing and controlling pollution of the environment is a major challenge facing both developed and developing countries. In this module, students will be initiated to the major environmental pollutants and to the current methods used to control soil and water pollutions.

Program 

Different types of organic and inorganic contaminants in surface water and groundwater



Document review of a contaminated site



Diagnostis of a contaminated site



Management process of contaminated site



Remediation techniques of contaminated water and soils

Learning outcomes 

Describe the different types of contaminants and their behavior in surface water and in groundwater



Based on document review, summarise the key factors and processes that are controling pollution



According to site context,disccuss the choice of the most accurate remediaition technqiue

Prerequisites 

Aquatic chemistry



Water flow and transport

Suggested readings  Appelo, C.A.J. and Postma, D. (1999) Geochemistry, groundwater and pollution. A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam.

Assessment method Oral defense.

Faculty and staff Coordinator: Olivier POURRET (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in geochemistry. Contact: [email protected] Lecturer: Raul E. MARTINEZ (Ph. D), Assistant Professor for Biogeochemistry and Aqueous Geochemistry. University of Freiburg, Germany. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

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International seminars (AA4306) 1 ECTS

International point of view about water and environmental management

Aim As spring program is limited to 4 months, the seminars provide opportunity to raise new topics and give prime examples of water management. The seminars will be given by professors from partner universities or specialists from public and private institutions. NB: French students from MSc “Agroecology, soil and Water conservation” will also attend this module.

Program (2017 edition) Program is still under construction. Here is the list of seminars held in 2017: 

Ms. Séverine Cornillon, University of Southampton (UK), Geodata Institute. Water and natural resources management in western africa using participatory mapping, “Decentralising Climate Funds” project in Mali and Senegal.



Ms. Erin Ward, Director of Border Programs, New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (USA). Improving transboundary groundwater governance: A case study from the U.S.-Mexico border



Mr. Ali Gül, Associate Professor, Hydraulics Division, Civil Engineering Department, Dokuz Eylül University, (Turkey). Assessing ecological conditions of wetland systems from a hydrological perspective through environmental river flow definitions.



Ms. Agnese Mancini, PhD student, Cranfield University (UK). Cover crops for sustainable maize production in the UK.



Ms. Rebecca North, Assistant Professor of Water Quality, School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri (USA). Is all phosphorus created equal?



Mr. Raul Martinez, Associate Professor of biogeochemistry, University of Freiburg (Germany). Open pit coal mining in NE-Vietnam: implications for the behavior of toxic trace elements in the rice rhizosphere

Prerequisites No prerequisites.

Assessment method Attendance to the seminar.

Faculty and staff Coordinator: Romain ARMAND (Ph.D.), Associate Professor in surface hydrology and GIS. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

30

French as a Foreign Language (LE0202) 2 ECTS

Discovering French language

Aim This module is designed for students who have had little or no previous French instruction. Students will discover French and acquire some basic tools for real-life language use while they study and travel in France. Class will be conducted entirely in French, and students will be expected to participate actively, using the language skills they are learning inside and outside the classroom. In the end, students are encouraged to pursue the study of French once they return to their home institutions.

Program 

Describe, narrate, and ask/answer questions in the foreign language in the present time about a variety of topics related to family, daily activities, eating, and traveling.



Comprehend the foreign language with sufficient ability to grasp the main idea in short conversations pertaining to the topics mentioned above.



Read and understand the main idea and some details of materials related to daily life and travel (maps, classified ads,)



Write sentences and short paragraphs on familiar topics relating to personal interests and practical needs. (e.g. postcards)

Prerequisites No prerequisite.

Assessment method Written examination.

Faculty and staff Coordinator and lecturer: Martine REY (Ph. D.), Associate Professor, Languages & Cultural Studies. Contact: [email protected]

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

31

Example of a transcript of academic record

Spring Semester in Water and Environmental Management – 2018 Syllabus

32